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choosing a Society name (was: Me and my friends)

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  • Coblaith Mhuimhneach
    ... If you re interested in registering your names, you should choose them with that goal in mind. It is very frustrating to pick a name, become attached to
    Message 1 of 9 , Jun 1, 2007
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      emrys_clearwater wrote:
      > I would like to get some resources for my friends about . . .Names. .
      > .but I don't want to overwhelm them with to much information. Where
      > are some good places to look?

      > (I know we shouldn't register names until we are sure we like them,
      > but I want to use mine and see how it feels being called that, and I
      > want to give my friends the chance too)


      If you're interested in registering your names, you should choose them
      with that goal in mind. It is very frustrating to pick a name, become
      attached to it, tell everybody to call you by it, then discover when
      you want to register it that it won't pass (or, for that matter, to
      become more interested in authenticity later on and start to be
      embarrassed by the name you chose because it's so unquestionably not
      realistic). Start with a documentable name, and you can avoid that.

      The Medieval Names Archive <http://s-gabriel.org/names/> is the perfect
      place to start looking. Read "Choosing a Society Name: Hints for
      Newcomers", then proceed to the guide for whichever culture interests
      you.

      If you have a particular name in mind, you might search the Academy of
      St. Gabriel's archives for it <http://s-gabriel.org/advancedsearch>.
      The Academy is a group that assists individuals in researching
      authentic pre-17th-century names and naming practices. It isn't part
      of the S.C.A., but many SCAdians turn there for help. If anyone else
      has asked the Academy about a given name in the past, the fruits of its
      research will be in a past report. Other names are also often
      mentioned in reports, as suggestions or examples of variants; a search
      will turn up that information, too. (For example, Report 3108 was
      written for a woman interested in the name "Cristin", but it also
      includes a citation for "Kristina".) When the Academy comes back from
      vacation, you can write them yourself, if you need further information
      on any names <http://s-gabriel.org/gabemail.html>.

      Your branch herald should have access to books you can use for further
      research, or at least access to other heralds who can help. If you
      can't find what you need online, go there.


      Coblaith Mhuimhneach
      Barony of Bryn Gwlad
      Kingdom of Ansteorra
      <mailto:Coblaith@...>
    • Bulgarelli Maria
      Ok. So far all the web sites that have been recommended are for someone who has more than an hour to spend making a tunic and has at least **some**
      Message 2 of 9 , Jun 1, 2007
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        Ok. So far all the web sites that have been
        recommended are for someone who has more than an hour
        to spend making a tunic and has at least **some**
        understanding of sewing.

        Just in case you have less understanding of sewing or
        just about an hour to make a tunic try this site.
        It's on the Ansteorra web site and it's got a t-tunic
        pattern on it that I seriously have taken an hour to
        make start to finish. Including hemming. Not
        Joking!!

        http://hospitaler.ansteorra.org//articles/fip.htm#All%20Purpose%20T-tunic

        Check it out. It's a good pattern and there's no set
        in sleeves in it either. I hate set in sleeves.

        Maria
        --- Coblaith Mhuimhneach <Coblaith@...>
        wrote:

        > emrys_clearwater wrote:
        > > I would like to get some resources for my friends
        > about Garb. . .but I
        > > don't want to overwhelm them with to much
        > information. Where are some
        > > good places
        > > to look?
        >
        >
        > If you want authentic, easy-to-make clothing for
        > your first event, I
        > recommend you start with some simple tunics, made
        > using period
        > construction like that outlined in Jane Stockton's
        > "Getting Started
        > with Tunics"
        > <http://needleprayse.webcon.net.au/research/
        > jane_stockton_getting_started_with_tunics_A4.pdf>.
        > Such garments were
        > worn from the beginning of the SCA millennium almost
        > to the end, all
        > over Europe (with some variations in details like
        > the shapes of sleeves
        > and necklines and the placement and type of trim).
        > They're economical
        > of fabric and easy to dress up or down. And if you
        > eventually decide
        > to develop a full-fledged persona, whatever it is
        > you'll be able to
        > continue to make use of them. (Even if you go
        > full-on royal Tudor or
        > Italian Ren, you'll need something to wear while
        > you're running to the
        > privy in the middle of the night or packing up in
        > the midst of a
        > deluge.)
        >
        > Add a veil
        > <http://www.virtue.to/articles/veils.html> for the
        > women, a
        > coif for the men
        > <http://www.virtue.to/articles/coif.html>, or a hood
        >
        > <http://www.virtue.to/articles/hoodlum.html> for
        > anybody, to keep the
        > sun off your heads and for that extra dash of
        > authenticity. A plain
        > leather belt with a simple buckle, a pouch or
        > satchel (or both) to keep
        > your "stuff" in
        > <http://moas.atlantia.sca.org/wsnlinks/index.php?
        > action=displaycat&catid=288>, and some unobtrusive
        > shoes (or period
        > ones
        >
        <http://www.personal.utulsa.edu/~marc-carlson/shoe/SHOEHOME.HTM>)
        >
        > will complete the basic medieval look . (If the
        > males are
        > uncomfortable in "dresses", they can shorten their
        > tunics and add hose
        > or trousers
        > <http://www.regia.org/members/basclot5d.htm>, but
        > it's not
        > necessary. Tunics are perfectly appropriate to
        > persons of both sexes.)
        >
        >
        > If you want to research clothing specific to various
        > times and places,
        > the Atlantian A&S Links for costume and clothing
        > <http://moas.atlantia.sca.org/wsnlinks/index.php?
        > action=displaycat&catid=10> are the perfect place to
        > start. (Which
        > articles you need will, of course, depend on which
        > culture, place, and
        > time interest you.)
        >
        >
        >
        > Coblaith Mhuimhneach
        > Barony of Bryn Gwlad
        > Kingdom of Ansteorra
        > <mailto:Coblaith@...>
        >
        >
      • Coblaith Mhuimhneach
        ... The rules of the Society only require you to make an attempt at pre-17th century clothing , not a good attempt. If you
        Message 3 of 9 , Jun 1, 2007
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          Maria wrote:
          > Just in case you have less understanding of sewing or just about an
          > hour to make a tunic try this site. It's on the Ansteorra web site and
          > it's got a t-tunic pattern on it that I seriously have taken an hour
          > to make start to finish. Including hemming. Not Joking!!
          >
          > http://hospitaler.ansteorra.org//articles/fip.htm#All%20Purpose%20T-
          > tunic

          The rules of the Society only require you to make "an attempt at
          pre-17th century clothing" <http://sca.org/docs/govdocs.pdf>, not a
          good attempt. If you want to use this approach, therefore, you can.

          But I think someone should warn you that this process creates a dress
          that doesn't hang right and doesn't fit right. It won't look like
          anything that was worn in the Middle Ages or Renaissance, and it
          probably won't be flattering or comfortable to wear. It also wastes a
          lot of fabric.

          A properly-constructed tunic doesn't require a lot of sewing skill, or
          even a lot of time. All the seams are straight. The only remotely
          fiddly thing about making one is setting in the gores in the front and
          back, and that just takes a bit of practice. You can even do it
          entirely by machine
          <http://www.renaissancetailor.com/demos_goresgussets.htm>, though I
          prefer to do the point by hand. (If you're really in a time crunch,
          you can leave them out altogether, provided your side gores are big
          enough to give you room to walk.) The only reason I can't finish one
          for myself in an hour is that I hem by hand, and do hand-stitching on
          the inside of the binding on my neckline and cuffs, to avoid visible
          machine stitching on the outside of the finished tunic. When I make
          one, I usually have just about enough fabric left over, within the
          yardage I cut, to make a pouch or two. (And it's in neat, rectangular
          pieces, so it can all be used.)

          I hate to see newcomers encouraged to put their effort into and spend
          their fabric on bad garb, when good garb would require only nominally
          more work.



          Coblaith Mhuimhneach
          Barony of Bryn Gwlad
          Kingdom of Ansteorra
          <mailto:Coblaith@...>
        • Bulgarelli Maria
          As a former Hospitaler, I do know the rules. However, I ve had a lot of newbies, guys especially, who don t know how to sew and just want something wasy to
          Message 4 of 9 , Jun 1, 2007
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            As a former Hospitaler, I do know the rules. However,
            I've had a lot of newbies, guys especially, who don't
            know how to sew and just want something wasy to make.
            They want to be able to sew a tunic quickly and they
            don't have a lot of patience for sewing either.

            As far as this particular pattern is concerned, I find
            the T-Tunic that I have made very comfortable. It's
            easy to make it a little fitted. All you have to do
            is take the correct measurements. And as for the
            sleeves, I like the pattern specifically because I
            don't have to play with set in sleeves. I use this
            when I want garb quick.

            Maria
            --- Coblaith Mhuimhneach <Coblaith@...>
            wrote:

            > Maria wrote:
            > > Just in case you have less understanding of sewing
            > or just about an
            > > hour to make a tunic try this site. It's on the
            > Ansteorra web site and
            > > it's got a t-tunic pattern on it that I seriously
            > have taken an hour
            > > to make start to finish. Including hemming. Not
            > Joking!!
            > >
            > >
            >
            http://hospitaler.ansteorra.org//articles/fip.htm#All%20Purpose%20T-
            >
            > > tunic
            >
            > The rules of the Society only require you to make
            > "an attempt at
            > pre-17th century clothing"
            > <http://sca.org/docs/govdocs.pdf>, not a
            > good attempt. If you want to use this approach,
            > therefore, you can.
            >
            > But I think someone should warn you that this
            > process creates a dress
            > that doesn't hang right and doesn't fit right. It
            > won't look like
            > anything that was worn in the Middle Ages or
            > Renaissance, and it
            > probably won't be flattering or comfortable to wear.
            > It also wastes a
            > lot of fabric.
            >
            > A properly-constructed tunic doesn't require a lot
            > of sewing skill, or
            > even a lot of time. All the seams are straight.
            > The only remotely
            > fiddly thing about making one is setting in the
            > gores in the front and
            > back, and that just takes a bit of practice. You
            > can even do it
            > entirely by machine
            >
            <http://www.renaissancetailor.com/demos_goresgussets.htm>,
            > though I
            > prefer to do the point by hand. (If you're really
            > in a time crunch,
            > you can leave them out altogether, provided your
            > side gores are big
            > enough to give you room to walk.) The only reason I
            > can't finish one
            > for myself in an hour is that I hem by hand, and do
            > hand-stitching on
            > the inside of the binding on my neckline and cuffs,
            > to avoid visible
            > machine stitching on the outside of the finished
            > tunic. When I make
            > one, I usually have just about enough fabric left
            > over, within the
            > yardage I cut, to make a pouch or two. (And it's in
            > neat, rectangular
            > pieces, so it can all be used.)
            >
            > I hate to see newcomers encouraged to put their
            > effort into and spend
            > their fabric on bad garb, when good garb would
            > require only nominally
            > more work.
            >
            >
            >
            > Coblaith Mhuimhneach
            > Barony of Bryn Gwlad
            > Kingdom of Ansteorra
            > <mailto:Coblaith@...>
            >
            >
          • Adrienne
            Hi, I have a question also -- I have a couple of bought patterns, (originally bought to make my wedding/bridesmaids dresses from) I wonder if anyone could tell
            Message 5 of 9 , Jun 4, 2007
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              Hi,

              I have a question also -- I have a couple of bought patterns,
              (originally bought to make my wedding/bridesmaids dresses from) I
              wonder if anyone could tell me whether these could be altered in some
              way to make garb or if I would be better off to just get rid of them?

              Thank you! The patterns I have are:

              M4378 (McCalls - http://www.mccallpattern.com/item/M4378.htm)
              M4492 (McCalls - http://www.mccallpattern.com/item/M4492.htm)

              YIS,
              Adrienne of Ravenshore
              Kingdom of the West
            • Coblaith Mhuimhneach
              ... In my opinion, it s almost always more trouble to alter commercial patterns--removing princess seams ,
              Message 6 of 9 , Jun 4, 2007
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                Adrienne of Ravenshore wrote:
                > . . .I wonder if anyone could tell me whether these could be altered
                > in some way to make garb or if I would be better off to just get rid
                > of them?

                In my opinion, it's almost always more trouble to alter commercial
                patterns--removing princess seams
                <http://www.reddawn.net/costume/princess.htm>, drafting out darts
                <http://www.reddawn.net/costume/darts.htm>, re-working closures,
                etc--than it would be to draft from scratch. Most medieval clothing
                was made of simple rectangles, triangles, squares, and trapezoids, so
                creating your own pattern in a medieval fashion isn't usually
                complicated.

                > M4378 (McCalls - http://www.mccallpattern.com/item/M4378.htm)
                > M4492 (McCalls - http://www.mccallpattern.com/item/M4492.htm)

                A look similar to the first of these might be achieved with a simple
                tunic with "angel" or "wind" sleeves--Jane Stockton's "Getting Started
                with Tunics" handout <http://needleprayse.webcon.net.au/research/>
                shows basic tunic construction and, on page 7, an illustration of the
                sleeve option. (It's just two triangles, added to the sides of the
                sleeve before it's sewn up.)

                Looking at both patterns together, however, I wonder if the historic
                garment with the look closest to what you want might be the bliaut.
                Several people have webbed instructions for their various approaches to
                making one (most include photos of the finished garment, so you can see
                whether that's what you want):

                <http://www.eg.bucknell.edu/~lwittie/sca/garb/bliaut.html>
                <http://www.gelfling.dds.nl/bliaut.html>
                <http://www.geocities.com/louise_de_la_mare/12th_Century_Bliaut.htm>
                <http://members.shaw.ca/evethejust/bliaut.html>


                Coblaith Mhuimhneach
                Barony of Bryn Gwlad
                Kingdom of Ansteorra
                <mailto:Coblaith@...>
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