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Re: [SCA Newcomers] Greetings!

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  • Elizabeth Cember
    So that s how that works. See, there s another example, I hadn t realized I didn t understand how the The Honorable thing worked. Actually, now that you
    Message 1 of 44 , May 31 8:28 AM
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      So that's how that works. See, there's another example, I hadn't realized I didn't understand how the "The Honorable" thing worked.

      Actually, now that you mention it, it does make sense that households don't register devices, since they often use the device of their founder and that's already registered. You know, besides the whole unofficial status aspect.

      Elspeth

      "I slept and dreamt that life was joy,
      I woke and saw that life was duty,
      I acted and behold, duty was joy"
      -- Rabinranath Tagore



      ----- Original Message ----
      From: Susan B. Farmer <sfarmer@...>
      To: scanewcomers@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Thursday, May 31, 2007 10:57:43 AM
      Subject: Re: [SCA Newcomers] Greetings!

      Quoting Elizabeth Cember <sapphire_chan@ yahoo.com>:

      > I don't know if households have official standing. They do register
      > their names and emblems with the College of Heralds, I believe.
      > Membership in those groups is generally by invitation.

      They do not.

      >
      > It is polite to address others as m'lord or m'lady, but Lord and
      > Lady are not used as titles until someone has received and award
      > which grants arms.

      Minor quibble point. An award that *grants* arms is different from an
      award which *awards* arms. If you have a Grant of Arms, then your
      "title" is The Honorable Lord/Lady -- addressed (in Meridies) as Your
      Lordship/Ladyship (at least that's my understanding) . In Meridies,
      your circlet is 1/2" instead of 1/4".

      > Of course, I didn't realize this was something to ask about and no
      > one thought to explain it to me until a year or so in, so there's a
      > scroll in Cynagua somewhere that was calligraphed by "Lady Elspeth
      > of Rivenstar". Who doesn't exist.
      >

      *yet* :-)

      jerusha
      -----
      Susan Farmer
      sfarmer@goldsword. com
      University of Tennessee
      Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
      http://www.goldswor d.com/sfarmer/ Trillium/






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    • Coblaith Mhuimhneach
      ... It s perfectly acceptable to put up hangings that are decorative, rather than heraldic, in nature. The practice is documentable to period as well as very
      Message 44 of 44 , Jun 1, 2007
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        emrys_clearwater wrote:
        > would it be appropriate to use a plain banner (field sans blazon)
        > until I have heraldry?

        It's perfectly acceptable to put up hangings that are decorative,
        rather than heraldic, in nature. The practice is documentable to
        period as well as very common in the S.C.A.

        The S.C.A. doesn't register single tinctures, including furs, so you
        can hang a plain banner without fear of violating anyone's rights.
        They can be very effective--pennons alternating the tinctures you've
        chosen can give a whole encampment "punch", for example.

        More elaborate banners are also fine, as long as they don't have a
        heraldic look. (Technically, you can also hang banners that _do_ look
        heraldic, but if you haven't put your design through the
        conflict-checking process, you might accidentally display someone
        else's registered device--a definite no-no.) Repeated floral or
        geometric motifs, scenes from famous stories, allegorical scenes, and
        overall decorative patterns are popular designs. Appliqué
        <http://www.bayrose.org/wkneedle/Articles/applique.html>, tapestry
        <http://www.metmuseum.org/explore/Unicorn/unicorn_inside.htm>,
        embroidery <http://www.bayrose.org/wkneedle/Articles/bayeux.html>, and
        painting <http://bryn-gwlad.ansteorra.org/articles/as/banner01/> are
        popular methods.


        Coblaith Mhuimhneach
        Barony of Bryn Gwlad
        Kingdom of Ansteorra
        <mailto:Coblaith@...>
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