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Picking a multi-era name?

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  • Juliann
    Greetings! I m planning to return to the SCA after a 13 year absence and even back then I wasn t heavily involved, never having gotten a name or device
    Message 1 of 9 , Apr 29 10:09 PM
      Greetings!

      I'm planning to return to the SCA after a 13 year absence and even
      back then I wasn't heavily involved, never having gotten a name or
      device approved. Nowadays I am interested in too many historical
      periods and I am worried about boxing myself in with a name that is
      too specific to any time period or region.

      How much is this an issue in the SCA today? I know people "period-
      hop" in their garb a fair bit, more than I recall in the past. But
      is it going to be odd to have, say, a 16th century English name while
      wearing Persian garb one time, Indian the next and early Roman
      another, etc? My interests go beyond my sewing skills so it will be
      quite some time before I can work up to later period European
      clothing although I certainly want to get there eventually.

      I know that some given names can be translated across different
      languages but I'm not aware of surnames that are as flexible.

      Any advice? Is it even worth worrying about?

      Thanks in advance,

      --Juliann
      living in Thamesreach, Insulae Draconis, Drachenwald (mka London,
      England)
    • Sara L Uckelman
      ... Greetings and welcome back to the SCA! The first advice I d give is don t worry about it. There are plenty of people who want to play in various time
      Message 2 of 9 , Apr 30 5:37 AM
        Quoth Juliann:
        > Any advice? Is it even worth worrying about?

        Greetings and welcome back to the SCA!

        The first advice I'd give is don't worry about it. There are plenty
        of people who want to play in various time periods and cultures.
        There's no reason to shoe-horn yourself into one specific time and
        place. For my part, my persona was born in Wales in 1013, but tends
        to spend a lot of time in London in the 14th century. :)

        You're right that there are many given names which were used
        throughout most European cultures, even though the spelling they take
        on varies from place to place (e.g. <John> in England, <Jehan> in
        France, <Eoin> in Ireland, <Juan> in Spain, <Giovanni> in Italy, <Hans>
        in Germany...). If you really want to have a cross-national name, one
        idea would be to pick as your 'standard' name a Latinized form. All
        of the above forms of <John> would have been rendered in the same way in
        a Latin document or in Latin speech - <Johannes>. Since Latin was the
        lingua anglica of the educated peoples throughout all of Europe, a
        Latinized name is appropriate for all cultures. Then if you were really
        ambitious, you could determine what the appropriate vernacular form
        of your name is for each different culture you're interested in re-creating,
        and use whatever form of your name goes with whatever clothes you're
        wearing. (But other people might find that rather difficult to follow...)

        -Aryanhwy



        --
        vita sine literis mors est
        http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/
      • Susan B. Farmer
        Quoting Juliann : *snip* ... Personally, I wouldn t worry about it. HOwever, if you really want to, pick something easy ... IITC, they ll
        Message 3 of 9 , Apr 30 6:32 AM
          Quoting Juliann <juliann@...>:

          *snip*

          >
          > I know that some given names can be translated across different
          > languages but I'm not aware of surnames that are as flexible.
          >
          > Any advice? Is it even worth worrying about?
          >

          Personally, I wouldn't worry about it. HOwever, if you really want
          to, pick something easy ... IITC, they'll only let you register *one*
          though ...

          One fellow I know is "John" but then he "translates" it to
          period/locale (i.e., John, Iohan, etc.). For a surname, try a byname
          instead ... William the Butcher (everybody had butchers, or tailors,
          or shoemakers or whatever ...) and for late period stuff, you could
          just become William Butcher.

          jerusha
          -----
          Susan Farmer
          sfarmer@...
          University of Tennessee
          Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
          http://www.goldsword.com/sfarmer/Trillium/
        • Sara L Uckelman
          ... You can register up to four different names - these can be alternate persona names, household names, or what have you, but you re not limited just to one.
          Message 4 of 9 , Apr 30 7:29 AM
            Quoth "Susan B. Farmer":
            > Personally, I wouldn't worry about it. HOwever, if you really want
            > to, pick something easy ... IITC, they'll only let you register *one*

            You can register up to four different names - these can be alternate
            persona names, household names, or what have you, but you're not
            limited just to one.

            -Aryanhwy




            --
            vita sine literis mors est
            http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/
          • Susan B. Farmer
            ... I love this list! I didn t know that! jerusha ... Susan Farmer sfarmer@goldsword.com University of Tennessee Department of Ecology and Evolutionary
            Message 5 of 9 , Apr 30 8:00 AM
              Quoting Sara L Uckelman <liana@...>:

              > Quoth "Susan B. Farmer":
              >> Personally, I wouldn't worry about it. HOwever, if you really want
              >> to, pick something easy ... IITC, they'll only let you register *one*
              >
              > You can register up to four different names - these can be alternate
              > persona names, household names, or what have you, but you're not
              > limited just to one.
              >

              I love this list! I didn't know that!

              jerusha
              -----
              Susan Farmer
              sfarmer@...
              University of Tennessee
              Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
              http://www.goldsword.com/sfarmer/Trillium/
            • Jibril ibn Najdah ibn Zayd al-`Attar
              ... *heh* That was one of the first things I noticed in the Admin Handbook when I was first studying on HE Modar. I think he s come to regret having shown me
              Message 6 of 9 , Apr 30 8:09 AM
                Aryanhwy::
                > > You can register up to four different names - these can be alternate
                > > persona names, household names, or what have you, but you're not
                > > limited just to one.
                > >

                Jerusha::
                > I love this list! I didn't know that!


                *heh* That was one of the first things I noticed in the Admin Handbook
                when I was first studying on HE Modar. I think he's come to regret
                having shown me that Handbook now...

                Names:
                1) Giudo di Niccolo Brunelleschi (registered)
                2) Mishka Lamanov (registered)
                3) Jedidiah Glasmon (at Laurel)
                4) Compagnia dell'Arcangelo Gabriele (at Laurel)

                Armory:
                1) Per pale embattled barry purpure and Or and gules, two lozenges in
                pale Or. (registered)
                2) Purpure, a pale argent overall and throughout a slip of weeping
                willow bendwise sinister. (at Laurel)
                3) (Fieldless) Four lozenges conjoined in cross quarterly gules and
                Or. (registered)
                4) (Fieldless) A belt in annulo bendwise sable, tipped and buckled Or.
                (at Laurel)

                Although a few things are going to be changing once I've heard back on
                everything that's currently at Laurel. *LOL*

                al-Sayyid Jibril ibn Najdah al-`Attar
                * a herald by too many names
              • mackayjenn
                You can always use one name and just change your garb. Say you re visiting or come up with something else, like you are now your great- great grandchild or
                Message 7 of 9 , Apr 30 12:08 PM
                  You can always use one name and just change your garb. Say you're
                  visiting or come up with something else, like you are now your great-
                  great grandchild or something.

                  Changing your name too much tends to frustrate and confuse your friends
                  and people who already know you by one name or the other.

                  Gemma Northwood
                  Abtir
                  Barony of Stromgard
                • Coblaith Mhuimhneach
                  Juliann ... A quick comment: The most common type of byname, across Europe throughout our period, was the patronymic. All you need to construct one of those
                  Message 8 of 9 , Apr 30 5:13 PM
                    Juliann
                    > I am worried about boxing myself in with a name that is too specific
                    > to any time period or region.

                    > I know that some given names can be translated across different
                    > languages but I'm not aware of surnames that are as flexible.

                    Aryanhwy wrote:

                    > If you really want to have a cross-national name, one idea would be to
                    > pick as your 'standard' name a Latinized form.. . .Since Latin was the
                    > lingua anglica of the educated peoples throughout all of Europe, a
                    > Latinized name is appropriate for all cultures. Then if you were
                    > really ambitious, you could determine what the appropriate vernacular
                    > form of your name is for each different culture you're interested in
                    > re-creating, and use whatever form of your name goes with whatever
                    > clothes you're wearing. (But other people might find that rather
                    > difficult to follow...)

                    A quick comment: The most common type of byname, across Europe
                    throughout our period, was the patronymic. All you need to construct
                    one of those is the correct form of "son of" or "daughter of" ("filius"
                    or "filia", in Latin, I believe) and a personal name for "your father",
                    so Aryanhwy's recommendation works just as well for your byname as your
                    personal name.


                    Coblaith Mhuimhneach
                    Barony of Bryn Gwlad
                    Kingdom of Ansteorra
                    <mailto:Coblaith@...>
                  • Sara L Uckelman
                    ... This is a bit to broad of a statement. In many cultures and time periods, locative bynames (ones indicating where the bearer originally came from) are
                    Message 9 of 9 , May 1, 2007
                      Quoth Coblaith Mhuimhneach:
                      > A quick comment: The most common type of byname, across Europe
                      > throughout our period, was the patronymic. All you need to construct

                      This is a bit to broad of a statement. In many cultures and time
                      periods, locative bynames (ones indicating where the bearer originally
                      came from) are much more common than patronymics. (In fact, I'd say
                      that this is true of all of the pre-1350 data sets of any language/
                      culture that I've studied).

                      -Aryanhwy




                      --
                      vita sine literis mors est
                      http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/
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