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8457peplos-style garb (was: New-ish One Here)

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  • Coblaith Mhuimhneach
    Jun 2, 2006
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      Gwenllian asked:
      > Can anyone recomend a type of garb for ladies that is not multiple
      > layers and originated for areas [that never or hardly ever reach above
      > 75-80]?

      Keith Howard replied:
      > I know several ladies who wear what I believe is called a "chitin"
      > dress or a bog dress.

      And Lisa said:
      > I just found this bog dress photo online:
      >
      > http://www.agelessfashions.com/html/ew-garb/ewpepl.htm
      >
      > Would this be appropriate to 10th century Ireland??

      The chiton (or peplos) was a popular style of dress in Greece in the
      Classical Age (which pre-dates not only the Middle Ages but the Roman
      Empire which preceded them). Other types of clothing similar in
      appearance were known in continental Europe, at least through most of
      the life of the Empire. They may or may not have been inspired by the
      chiton. Early Period, vol. 5, included an article on chitons and their
      "descendants" <http://www.housebarra.com/EP/ep05/14chiton.html> that
      might help clarify.

      Generally, when people say, "bog dress", they're referring to a tube
      dress
      <http://www.archaeology.org/online/features/bog/jpegs/huldremose2.jpeg>
      found near the site from which a female mummy was recovered in
      Huldremose Bog, in Jutland (Denmark). Huldremose Woman died between
      the late 2nd and early 4th century C.E., and the dress is thought by
      many to have been buried with her. It's impossible to say whether, if
      she wore the dress, it was by itself or as one of several layers of
      clothing.

      Something like a peplos and/or the Huldremose gown were probably worn
      in Ireland at some point, but by the 10th century C.E. were almost
      certainly gone and forgotten. If you're interested in dressing as an
      Irish Gael from that period, I recommend you read Finnacán Dub's "Early
      Gaelic Dress: An Introduction"
      <http://home.earthlink.net/~masterdarius/Resources/GaelicDress.pdf>.


      Coblaith Mhuimhneach
      Barony of Bryn Gwlad
      Kingdom of Ansteorra
      <mailto:Coblaith@...>
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