Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

lamb & Lenten recipes

Expand Messages
  • Cascio Michael
    Hi All, Christmas is over and it will soon be Lent, so I have questions. Does anyone have any good lamb recipes as I have a lamb roast I would like to do
    Message 1 of 6 , Jan 1, 2010
    • 0 Attachment
      Hi All,
      Christmas is over and it will soon be Lent, so I have questions.
      Does anyone have any good lamb recipes as I have a lamb roast I would like to do something with before Lent.
      And then there is Lent. Has anyone done a Medieval Lent for the full time length? If so from when and where? I'm reasonably certain that what was allowed changed from country to country and century to century. I once saw a list of all the food items considered not meat and it included a number of birds and even young rabbits as not meat. Plus, of course all the seafood and fish. So if you have tried this in the past or have a useful list of foods, recipes, or feast versus fast days I would be very interested.
      And I got a copy of the Eileen Powers Goodman of Paris for Christmas and am enjoying it greatly. Thanks in advance.
      Cassandra
    • Marcus Antaya
      Hello Cassandra, I know that a ton of people will give you recipes for Rosemary Lamb with mint sauce (shudder), but in this particular instance my tastes are
      Message 2 of 6 , Jan 1, 2010
      • 0 Attachment
        Hello Cassandra,

        I know that a ton of people will give you recipes for Rosemary Lamb with mint sauce (shudder), but in this particular instance my tastes are NOT British. More Greek.

        Pierce the lamb and stuff with garlic. Make a marinade of regular olive oil, greek oregano, lemon juice, paprika and more garlic...pureed. Marinate overnight, then when you cook it, baste it with the marinade that is left. Cook lamb according to weight and temp for what kind of lamb you have (leg, chops, etc.). When you're about 15 minutes off done, squeeze fresh lemon juice over the whole thing.

        It's fantastic, and no mint to behold anywhere in the menu....

        Gyric

        Lord Gyric of Otershaghe
        Troubadour, Entertainer and generally all-around Chaotic Neutral guy
        REMEMBER: Eagles may soar, but Weasels don't get sucked into jet engines....

        --- On Fri, 1/1/10, Cascio Michael <rosenau5@...> wrote:

        From: Cascio Michael <rosenau5@...>
        Subject: [sca_recipes] lamb & Lenten recipes
        To: sca_recipes@yahoogroups.com
        Received: Friday, January 1, 2010, 10:11 AM

         

        Hi All,
        Christmas is over and it will soon be Lent, so I have questions.
        Does anyone have any good lamb recipes as I have a lamb roast I would like to do something with before Lent.
        And then there is Lent. Has anyone done a Medieval Lent for the full time length? If so from when and where? I'm reasonably certain that what was allowed changed from country to country and century to century. I once saw a list of all the food items considered not meat and it included a number of birds and even young rabbits as not meat. Plus, of course all the seafood and fish. So if you have tried this in the past or have a useful list of foods, recipes, or feast versus fast days I would be very interested.
        And I got a copy of the Eileen Powers Goodman of Paris for Christmas and am enjoying it greatly. Thanks in advance.
        Cassandra



        Looking for the perfect gift? Give the gift of Flickr!
      • Susan Harmon
        Here is a link to an article that was written for the SCA in *Tournaments Illuminated* back in 2003 which covers most of what you asked about Lent.
        Message 3 of 6 , Jan 2, 2010
        • 0 Attachment
          Here is a link to an article that was written for the SCA in Tournaments Illuminated back in 2003 which covers most of what you asked about Lent. http://anvil.unl.edu/agnes/RecreatingLent.htm
           
          Hope this is of some help.
          The author has also written several more articles that may be of some use.
           
          Brighit of the MacGregor
          --
          "I'm okay with the singing, but my friends say I have a long way
          to go with the whole harmonizing thing."

          ~Brightest Blessings  @-,-'--
        • Susan Harmon
          Sorry about the double posting, but just found some more information that some may find useful. http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/09152a.htm
          Message 4 of 6 , Jan 2, 2010
          • 0 Attachment
            Sorry about the double posting, but just found some more information that some may find useful.
             
            Once again, sorry about not posting more the first time.
            There is much more information out on the internet if you care to do further research.

            On Sat, Jan 2, 2010 at 12:54 PM, Susan Harmon <sca.brighit@...> wrote:
            Here is a link to an article that was written for the SCA in Tournaments Illuminated back in 2003 which covers most of what you asked about Lent. http://anvil.unl.edu/agnes/RecreatingLent.htm
             
            Hope this is of some help.
            The author has also written several more articles that may be of some use.
             
            Brighit of the MacGregor
            --
            "I'm okay with the singing, but my friends say I have a long way
            to go with the whole harmonizing thing."

            ~Brightest Blessings  @-,-'--



            --
            "I'm okay with the singing, but my friends say I have a long way
            to go with the whole harmonizing thing."

            ~Brightest Blessings  @-,-'--
          • richard kappler
            As I recall this is from Platina, and this may not be a precise redaction, I ve done this recipe so many times I no longer look it up, just do it from memory
            Message 5 of 6 , Jan 2, 2010
            • 0 Attachment
              As I recall this is from Platina, and this may not be a precise redaction, I've done this recipe so many times I no longer look it up, just do it from memory therefore it has of course evolved a wee bit, so if you want it exactly period, look it up.  If memory serves its Hadeus in Aielo or some such.

              Heat oven to 450-475 ish.  Separate two small egg yolks, grind up 2-3 rosemary leaves, mash a half dozen cloves garlic, pinch salt, heavy pinch pepper, acouplethree very liberal pinches saffron (think rolling a fatty, not saving $ on saffron), 3-4 tbsp virgin olive oil.  Being as we are who we are, if no virgin is available, good enough will work (wink).  Grind your dry spices in your mortar, then mix all this thoroughly in a bowl.  Have a cup of good veal or beef stock handy, don't go to great expense or effort, in a dozen or so times making this, I've only ever needed it once.  Determine how well done you want your lamb, look up the internal temp you need to achieve that.

              Rub lamb liberally with garlic, olive oil, a wee bit salt and pepper.  Throw the little bugger in the oven for 15 -20 minutes.  Remove from oven, reduce heat to 250 ish.  Using a turkey baster, remove all the loverly juices under your lamb.  Mix them with the saffron egg mix,  paint the lamb with the baste mix. no, don't baste it with the turkey baster, if you did it right, it will have the consistency of paint, not broth, and you will have very little, but enough to paint with. EVERY 15 MINUTES (yes, painful, but worth it) do the same thing.  Remove the loose juices from the pan, add to the basting mix, paint the lamb, back in the oven.  Keep going until you reach your predetermined internal temperature.  If your lamb is particularly lean you will run out of juices before your lamb is cooked.  This is where the veal/beef stock (can o' beef broth in a pinch) comes in.  When your baste mix gets dryish, add the stock, keep basting.  We like this recipe well done, so I usually let it go a good sixish hours.  Your mileage may vary.

              If you've actually basted this every 15 minutes and monitored your temps carefully, you will end up with a piece of lamb that will be crusty and yummers on the outside and melt in your mouth tender, better than foreplay delicious on the inside.

              regards, Puck


            • Sonny
              You paint it every 15 minutes for six hours? Sounds almost like you are smoking it. (On a grill that is) ________________________________ From: richard kappler
              Message 6 of 6 , Jan 2, 2010
              • 0 Attachment
                You paint it every 15 minutes for six hours? Sounds almost like you are smoking it. (On a grill that is)


                From: richard kappler <richkappler@...>
                To: sca_recipes@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Sat, January 2, 2010 6:34:04 PM
                Subject: [sca_recipes] Re: lamb & Lenten recipes

                 

                As I recall this is from Platina, and this may not be a precise redaction, I've done this recipe so many times I no longer look it up, just do it from memory therefore it has of course evolved a wee bit, so if you want it exactly period, look it up.  If memory serves its Hadeus in Aielo or some such.

                Heat oven to 450-475 ish.  Separate two small egg yolks, grind up 2-3 rosemary leaves, mash a half dozen cloves garlic, pinch salt, heavy pinch pepper, acouplethree very liberal pinches saffron (think rolling a fatty, not saving $ on saffron), 3-4 tbsp virgin olive oil.  Being as we are who we are, if no virgin is available, good enough will work (wink).  Grind your dry spices in your mortar, then mix all this thoroughly in a bowl.  Have a cup of good veal or beef stock handy, don't go to great expense or effort, in a dozen or so times making this, I've only ever needed it once.  Determine how well done you want your lamb, look up the internal temp you need to achieve that.

                Rub lamb liberally with garlic, olive oil, a wee bit salt and pepper.  Throw the little bugger in the oven for 15 -20 minutes.  Remove from oven, reduce heat to 250 ish.  Using a turkey baster, remove all the loverly juices under your lamb.  Mix them with the saffron egg mix,  paint the lamb with the baste mix. no, don't baste it with the turkey baster, if you did it right, it will have the consistency of paint, not broth, and you will have very little, but enough to paint with. EVERY 15 MINUTES (yes, painful, but worth it) do the same thing.  Remove the loose juices from the pan, add to the basting mix, paint the lamb, back in the oven.  Keep going until you reach your predetermined internal temperature.  If your lamb is particularly lean you will run out of juices before your lamb is cooked.  This is where the veal/beef stock (can o' beef broth in a pinch) comes in.  When your baste mix gets dryish, add the stock, keep basting.  We like this recipe well done, so I usually let it go a good sixish hours.  Your mileage may vary.

                If you've actually basted this every 15 minutes and monitored your temps carefully, you will end up with a piece of lamb that will be crusty and yummers on the outside and melt in your mouth tender, better than foreplay delicious on the inside.

                regards, Puck


              Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.