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Question concerning recipe

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  • Lynn/Eithne Tuatha De Danaan
    I m having trouble with something in Take A Thousand Eggs Or More. When the recipe refers to cooked spelt, I m not quite sure what this means. I m assuming
    Message 1 of 7 , Sep 7, 2007
      I'm having trouble with something in Take A Thousand Eggs Or More.
      When the recipe refers to "cooked spelt," I'm not quite sure what this
      means. I'm assuming its not spelt in its flour form, but I'm still
      not really sure how to attain it.

      Thank you for any help.

      Eithne
    • Jehan Yves de Chateau Thiery
      ... It would help to know which recipe, and from which volume. JehanYves
      Message 2 of 7 , Sep 8, 2007
        At 06:44 PM 9/7/2007, you wrote:
        >I'm having trouble with something in Take A Thousand Eggs Or More.
        >When the recipe refers to "cooked spelt," I'm not quite sure what this
        >means. I'm assuming its not spelt in its flour form, but I'm still
        >not really sure how to attain it.
        >
        >Thank you for any help.
        >
        >Eithne
        It would help to know which recipe, and from which volume.
        JehanYves
      • dulcinea2168
        Not knowing the specific recipe you are referring to, I am unable to aswer your question directly. However, in general, I had always believed Spelt to be a
        Message 3 of 7 , Sep 8, 2007
          Not knowing the specific recipe you are referring to, I am unable to
          aswer your question directly. However, in general, I had always
          believed Spelt to be a small sized (finger length or so) type of fish.

          Dulcinea of the East


          --- In sca_recipes@yahoogroups.com, Jehan Yves de Chateau Thiery
          <jehan.yves@...> wrote:
          >
          > At 06:44 PM 9/7/2007, you wrote:
          > >I'm having trouble with something in Take A Thousand Eggs Or More.
          > >When the recipe refers to "cooked spelt," I'm not quite sure what
          this
          > >means. I'm assuming its not spelt in its flour form, but I'm still
          > >not really sure how to attain it.
          > >
          > >Thank you for any help.
          > >
          > >Eithne
          > It would help to know which recipe, and from which volume.
          > JehanYves
          >
        • Amy E. Sousa
          Greetings! ... The fish you re referring to is actually a sMelt not sPelt. :) From just a google search, spelt seems to be something resembling wheat. As
          Message 4 of 7 , Sep 8, 2007
            Greetings!

            --- dulcinea2168 <gamegirl2168@...> wrote:
            > However, in general, I had always
            > believed Spelt to be a small sized (finger length or
            > so) type of fish.

            The fish you're referring to is actually a sMelt not
            sPelt. :) From just a google search, spelt seems to
            be something resembling wheat.

            As others have said, it'd help to see the original
            recipe if you wouldn't mind posting it. I'm assuming
            the spelt is listed as part of a redaction?

            Cheers,

            Elisabeth

            ==================================================

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            Barony of the Bridge, EK


            "My Love in her attire doth show her wit,
            It doth so well become her:
            For every season she hath dressings fit,
            For Winter, Spring, and Summer. "

            ~Francis T. Palgrave, (1824–1897)



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          • Mairi Ceilidh
            Spelt is a grain, and can sometimes be purchased whole or ground into flour at full service health food type grocery stores. Smelt is the fish. Mairi Ceilidh
            Message 5 of 7 , Sep 8, 2007

              Spelt is a grain, and can sometimes be purchased whole or ground into flour at full service health food type grocery stores.  Smelt is the fish.

               

              Mairi Ceilidh

               


              Not knowing the specific recipe you are referring to, I am unable to
              aswer your question directly. However, in general, I had always
              believed Spelt to be a small sized (finger length or so) type of fish.

              Dulcinea of the East

              --- In sca_recipes@ yahoogroups. com, Jehan Yves de Chateau Thiery
              <jehan.yves@ ...> wrote:

              >
              > At 06:44 PM 9/7/2007 ,
              you wrote:
              > >I'm having trouble with something in Take A Thousand Eggs Or More.
              > >When the recipe refers to "cooked spelt," I'm not quite sure
              what
              this
              > >means. I'm assuming its not spelt in its flour form, but I'm still
              > >not really sure how to attain it.
              > >
              > >Thank you for any help.
              > >
              > >Eithne
              > It would help to know which recipe, and from which volume.
              > JehanYves

            • dairyqmamma
              Spelt is a grain very similar to wheat. You can often get it whole in health food stores, but wheat berry would be a fine substitute which you can positively
              Message 6 of 7 , Sep 8, 2007
                Spelt is a grain very similar to wheat. You can often get it whole in
                health food stores, but wheat berry would be a fine substitute which
                you can positively get in health food stores. It takes about 45
                minutes to cook it whole. (Like brown rice.)
                ~Claire

                --- In sca_recipes@yahoogroups.com, "Lynn/Eithne Tuatha De Danaan"
                <cheetahgirllm@...> wrote:
                >
                > I'm having trouble with something in Take A Thousand Eggs Or More.
                > When the recipe refers to "cooked spelt," I'm not quite sure what this
                > means. I'm assuming its not spelt in its flour form, but I'm still
                > not really sure how to attain it.
                >
                > Thank you for any help.
                >
                > Eithne
                >
              • Lynn/Eithne Tuatha De Danaan
                Sorry if my question was vague, but the responses I have recieved have been extremely helpful, so thank you to everyone for their advice. I really appreciate
                Message 7 of 7 , Sep 9, 2007
                  Sorry if my question was vague, but the responses I have recieved
                  have been extremely helpful, so thank you to everyone for their
                  advice. I really appreciate it. I know I'll come to here again if
                  I have any other questions involving cooking :D

                  Thank you,
                  Eithne :)


                  --- In sca_recipes@yahoogroups.com, "dairyqmamma" <dairyqmamma@...>
                  wrote:
                  >
                  > Spelt is a grain very similar to wheat. You can often get it
                  whole in
                  > health food stores, but wheat berry would be a fine substitute
                  which
                  > you can positively get in health food stores. It takes about 45
                  > minutes to cook it whole. (Like brown rice.)
                  > ~Claire
                  >
                  > --- In sca_recipes@yahoogroups.com, "Lynn/Eithne Tuatha De Danaan"
                  > <cheetahgirllm@> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > I'm having trouble with something in Take A Thousand Eggs Or
                  More.
                  > > When the recipe refers to "cooked spelt," I'm not quite sure
                  what this
                  > > means. I'm assuming its not spelt in its flour form, but I'm
                  still
                  > > not really sure how to attain it.
                  > >
                  > > Thank you for any help.
                  > >
                  > > Eithne
                  > >
                  >
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