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Monthly Recipe

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  • Jehan-Yves
    This month s recipe is taken from Gervase Markham s The English Housewife as Edited by Michael Best. Chapter II, number 122 A Norfolk fool Take a pint of
    Message 1 of 8 , May 15, 2007
      This month's recipe is taken from Gervase Markham's "The English
      Housewife" as Edited by Michael Best. Chapter II, number 122

      A Norfolk fool
      Take a pint of the sweetest and thickest cream that can be
      gotten, and set it on the fire in a very clean scoured skillet, and
      put into it sugar, cinnamon, and a nutmeg cut into four quarters, and
      so boil it well: then take the yolks of four eggs, and take off the
      films, and beat them well with a little sweet cream: then take the
      four quarters of the nutmeg out of the cream, then put in the eggs,
      and stir it exceedingly, till it be thick: then take fine manchet,
      and cut it into thin shives, as much as will cover a dish bottom,
      and, holding it in your hand, pour half the cream into the dish; then
      lay your bread over it, then cover the bread with the rest of the
      cream, and so let it stand till it be cold: then strew it over with
      caraway comfits, and prick up some cinnamon comfits, and some sliced
      dates: or for want thereof, scrape all over it some sugar, and trim
      the sides of the dish with sugar, and so serve it up.


      Jehan-Yves


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    • Kerri Martinsen
      Yummm... Dessert.... 1st question: How does one cut a nutmeg into quarters? With a saw? 2nd question: Where can I get comfits? Vitha
      Message 2 of 8 , May 15, 2007
        Re: [sca_recipes] Monthly Recipe Yummm... Dessert....

        1st question:  How does one cut a nutmeg into quarters?  With a saw?
        2nd question:  Where can I get comfits?

        Vitha

        On 5/15/07 10:07 AM, "Jehan-Yves" <jehan.yves@...> wrote:


         
         

        This month's recipe is taken from Gervase Markham's  "The English
        Housewife"  as Edited by Michael Best. Chapter II, number 122

        A Norfolk fool
         Take a pint of the sweetest and thickest cream that can be
        gotten, and set it on the fire in a very clean scoured skillet, and
        put into it sugar, cinnamon, and a nutmeg cut into four quarters, and
        so boil it well: then take the yolks of four eggs, and take off the
        films, and beat them well with a little sweet cream: then take the
        four quarters of the nutmeg out of the cream, then put in the eggs,
        and stir it exceedingly, till it be thick: then take fine manchet,
        and cut it into thin shives, as much as will cover a dish bottom,
        and, holding it in your hand, pour half the cream into the dish; then
        lay your bread over it, then cover the bread with the rest of the
        cream, and so let it stand till it be cold: then strew it over with
        caraway comfits, and prick up some cinnamon comfits, and some sliced
        dates: or for want thereof, scrape all over it some sugar, and trim
        the sides of the dish with sugar, and so serve it up.

        Jehan-Yves

      • Jehan-Yves
        ... I find that putting a nutmeg on a dishtowel to hold it in place, I can use a large knife placed on the nutmeg and strike it with the heel of my hand. this
        Message 3 of 8 , May 15, 2007
          At 10:17 AM 5/15/2007, you wrote:

          Yummm... Dessert....

          1st question:  How does one cut a nutmeg into quarters?  With a saw?

          I find that putting a nutmeg on a dishtowel to hold it in place, I can use a large knife placed on the nutmeg and strike it with the heel of my hand. this makes halves, then repeat for quarters.

          2nd question:  Where can I get comfits?

          I've seen them in grocery stores, candy stores, but the best are homemade. Look in the florolegium for recipes and techniques.


          Vitha

          Jehan-Yves

        • moirarowanborn
          Anybody know if candied violets would be period? It would be beautiful and perfect for a wedding shower I need to do. Moira ... 5/12/2007 6:40 PM
          Message 4 of 8 , May 16, 2007
            Anybody know if candied violets would be period? It would be
            beautiful and perfect for a wedding shower I need to do.

            Moira

            --- In sca_recipes@yahoogroups.com, Jehan-Yves <jehan.yves@...> wrote:
            >
            > At 10:17 AM 5/15/2007, you wrote:
            >
            > >Yummm... Dessert....
            > >
            > >1st question: How does one cut a nutmeg into quarters? With a saw?
            >
            > I find that putting a nutmeg on a dishtowel to hold it in place, I
            > can use a large knife placed on the nutmeg and strike it with the
            > heel of my hand. this makes halves, then repeat for quarters.
            >
            > >2nd question: Where can I get comfits?
            >
            > I've seen them in grocery stores, candy stores, but the best are
            > homemade. Look in the florolegium for recipes and techniques.
            >
            >
            > >Vitha
            >
            > Jehan-Yves
            >
            >
            > No virus found in this outgoing message.
            > Checked by AVG Free Edition.
            > Version: 7.5.467 / Virus Database: 269.7.0/801 - Release Date:
            5/12/2007 6:40 PM
            >
          • Jehan-Yves
            ... The following was copied from an article at Stefan s Florilegium at http://www.florilegium.org/ you can do a search there for candied violets and get a few
            Message 5 of 8 , May 16, 2007
              At 10:41 AM 5/16/2007, you wrote:

              >Anybody know if candied violets would be period? It would be
              >beautiful and perfect for a wedding shower I need to do.
              >
              >Moira

              The following was copied from an article at Stefan's Florilegium at
              http://www.florilegium.org/
              you can do a search there for candied violets and get a few more listings.

              Violets [Viola odorata], the small dark-blue May-blooming flowers
              with heart-shaped dark green leaves, were popular too. In addition to
              being carried in tussy-mussies, they figured in food and pharmacy.
              Leaves and flowers both featured in salads (Markham suggests pickling
              them in vinegar for winter salads). Candied violets, violet sugar,
              and violet syrup were popular products of the stillroom (though I've
              never succeeded making them myself). Easy to care for and
              multiplying readily, violets can simply be tucked in a spot with part
              shade or in a pot kept out of the sun. Violet plants are very sturdy;
              they like rich, dampish soil but will make do with most soils.


              Jehan-Yves


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            • Jehan-Yves
              I forgot to include the part of that article that properly gives credit to Medieval Herbs for the Very Small Garden by Jadwiga Zajaczkowa now Mistress Jadwiga
              Message 6 of 8 , May 16, 2007
                I forgot to include the part of that article that properly gives credit to

                Medieval Herbs for the Very Small Garden
                by Jadwiga Zajaczkowa

                now Mistress Jadwiga Zajaczkowa of the East Kingdom

                Jehan-Yves


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              • Jehan Yves de Chateau Thiery
                I am getting this in a day early as I will be at a demo tomorrow. As a reminder...anyone having a request (you can see most of what I have in my library at
                Message 7 of 8 , Jul 14, 2007
                  I am getting this in a day early as I will be at a demo tomorrow. As
                  a reminder...anyone having a request (you can see most of what I have
                  in my library at
                  http://www.librarything.com/catalog.php?view=Jehan-Yves )
                  Please let me know. I can do more than one a month.
                  JehanYves

                  For this month we will use the Terence Scully translation of "the
                  Viandier of Taillevent" page 289 recipe 83

                  83. Soupe en moustarde: Mustard Sops. Take the oil in which you
                  fried or poached your eggs without shells, with wine and water and
                  chopped onions fried in oil, and boil everything in an iron pan; then
                  take crusts of bread, toast them on the grill, cut them into square
                  pieces and add them to boil with the other; then strain your
                  bouillon, and drain your sops and drop them on a plate (var.; bowl);
                  then put a little very thick mustard into your bouillon pan and boil
                  everything and pour it on top of the sops.
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