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Re: [sca_moneyer] Digest Number 253

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  • jklessig
    ... It varies, but I usually shoot for a straw at the end of the punch. Some times I overshoot, easy to do on a small punch, depends a lot on what I have to do
    Message 1 of 2 , Apr 1, 2003
      >
      >Message: 3
      > Date: Sun, 30 Mar 2003 20:24:34 -0800
      > From: "g.p.franck-weiby" <sfranckw@...>
      >Subject: Re: Digest Number 252
      >>> Once
      >>>you're done shaping the punch, heat treat it to harden it, but don't temper
      >>>it, as it needs to be harder than the annealed steel die stock you're
      >>>
      >>
      >> I would disagree. I think it should be tempered after hardening.
      >>
      >As I said, if you have the resources (in this case, the technical
      >know-how), there's nothing wrong with a more sophisticated approach to tool
      >making. However, if people decide to temper their punches, a little more
      >info is needed. What color do you draw the temper at, Chandra?

      It varies, but I usually shoot for a straw at the end of the punch. Some
      times I overshoot, easy to do on a small punch, depends a lot on what I
      have to do the tempering with.
      >
      >Also, do you harden harden the whole length of the punch
      Heck no, I value my eyes more than that.

      or just the end?
      >If you harden the whole length, do you temper the whole length? I recall
      >that, many years ago, an old tool and die maker told me the whole length
      >should be hardened, but the shaft tempered rather than the end (or the
      >shaft more than the end) to eliminate the danger of a brittle shaft
      >breaking.

      This is mostly what I am trying to accomplish.
      I am by no means an expert, and would not even try to guess how to harden
      anneal or temper the better steels like "high speed steel"


      > That made sense to me, but sounded like it required more skill
      >than I have;
      I doubt that. Polish, heat from the middle (slowly) and quench before any
      colors get to the punch end of the tool, and you will have a punch face
      that is still full hard, with a shaft that is less brittle.

      If you don't mind snapping some punches, then yes not strictly necessary.

      >i.e. it's a good idea, although not strictly necessary for
      >lazy people like me. :-)
      >
      >


      Chandra

      >
    • g.p.franck-weiby
      ... Out of over 150 punches I ve made, I ve only snapped two. Both of those were overhardened because I used a big hairy acetylene/air torch (which I normally
      Message 2 of 2 , Apr 1, 2003
        At 01:19 AM 4/1/2003 -0800, Chandra wrote:
        >
        > If you don't mind snapping some punches, then yes not strictly necessary.
        >
        Out of over 150 punches I've made, I've only snapped two. Both of those
        were overhardened because I used a big hairy acetylene/air torch (which I
        normally only used for melting gold and silver) when my propane torch was
        clogged up and I was in a hurry.

        I'm a little bit concerned about newbies getting obsessed and hungup about
        technicalities of tool making. On the basis of my experience of sinking
        over 150 dies over thirteen years, my recommendation is just get the tip of
        the punch as hard as you can get it - and then go for it. If you damage a
        punch, it's really easy to make another one - but I've rarely had to make
        another one.

        Ian
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