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Vigil token bracteates

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  • Brian Ferguson
    Hello all, As some of you know, I was put on vigil for the order of the laurel recently. One tradition here is for the person on vigil to give tokens to those
    Message 1 of 9 , Apr 8, 2011
      Hello all,

      As some of you know, I was put on vigil for the order of the laurel recently.  One tradition here is for the person on vigil to give tokens to those who give him advice.  Being a moneyer, I wanted to provide silver strikes.  Being "frugal" and aware of the current spot price, I wanted to use as little silver as possible!  So, I decided to do a small bracteate ((Fieldless) Four ermine spots conjoined in saltire sable), displayed with the badge of the order ((Tinctureless) A laurel wreath):

      http://www.flickr.com/photos/derianlebreton/5566115367/
      http://www.flickr.com/photos/derianlebreton/5566690814/

      A bracteate is a single-sided coin made of very thin metal (0.2mm in this case, about two sheets of paper).  Since each coin is half an inch in diameter, this works out to be about a third of a gram per coin.  The metal is so thin that it can easily be bent, so bracteate designs often incorporated a stiffening ridge (the thick engraved line just inside the border beading on my coin).  These are struck using a positive and negative die that fit together; this isn't as hard as it sounds, since the positive die is made from a pipe-cap filled with pewter.  The negative die is pushed into the pewter while it is still molten (the die is keyed with file cuts), and then the cap is struck many times to strike up the detail of the die in the pewter.

      -Derian le Breton.
    • thomas kagarise
      Congratz! that is a neat trick i will have to try that one out Guillaume To: sca_moneyer@yahoogroups.com From: derianlebreton@gmail.com Date: Fri, 8 Apr 2011
      Message 2 of 9 , Apr 8, 2011
        Congratz!
         
        that is a neat trick i will have to try that one out
         
        Guillaume
         

        To: sca_moneyer@yahoogroups.com
        From: derianlebreton@...
        Date: Fri, 8 Apr 2011 08:58:44 -0700
        Subject: [sca_moneyer] Vigil token bracteates

         
        Hello all,

        As some of you know, I was put on vigil for the order of the laurel recently.  One tradition here is for the person on vigil to give tokens to those who give him advice.  Being a moneyer, I wanted to provide silver strikes.  Being "frugal" and aware of the current spot price, I wanted to use as little silver as possible!  So, I decided to do a small bracteate ((Fieldless) Four ermine spots conjoined in saltire sable), displayed with the badge of the order ((Tinctureless) A laurel wreath):

        http://www.flickr.com/photos/derianlebreton/5566115367/
        http://www.flickr.com/photos/derianlebreton/5566690814/

        A bracteate is a single-sided coin made of very thin metal (0.2mm in this case, about two sheets of paper).  Since each coin is half an inch in diameter, this works out to be about a third of a gram per coin.  The metal is so thin that it can easily be bent, so bracteate designs often incorporated a stiffening ridge (the thick engraved line just inside the border beading on my coin).  These are struck using a positive and negative die that fit together; this isn't as hard as it sounds, since the positive die is made from a pipe-cap filled with pewter.  The negative die is pushed into the pewter while it is still molten (the die is keyed with file cuts), and then the cap is struck many times to strike up the detail of the die in the pewter.

        -Derian le Breton.

      • JonThomme De Claydon
        Derian, while we are on the subject... In which art are you being elevated? ... -- In service to the dream Baron Jon Thomme Gold is for the mistress Silver for
        Message 3 of 9 , Apr 8, 2011
          Derian, while we are on the subject...
          In which art are you being elevated?


          On Fri, Apr 8, 2011 at 8:58 AM, Brian Ferguson <derianlebreton@...> wrote:
           

          Hello all,

          As some of you know, I was put on vigil for the order of the laurel recently.  One tradition here is for the person on vigil to give tokens to those who give him advice.  Being a moneyer, I wanted to provide silver strikes.  Being "frugal" and aware of the current spot price, I wanted to use as little silver as possible!  So, I decided to do a small bracteate ((Fieldless) Four ermine spots conjoined in saltire sable), displayed with the badge of the order ((Tinctureless) A laurel wreath):

          http://www.flickr.com/photos/derianlebreton/5566115367/
          http://www.flickr.com/photos/derianlebreton/5566690814/

          A bracteate is a single-sided coin made of very thin metal (0.2mm in this case, about two sheets of paper).  Since each coin is half an inch in diameter, this works out to be about a third of a gram per coin.  The metal is so thin that it can easily be bent, so bracteate designs often incorporated a stiffening ridge (the thick engraved line just inside the border beading on my coin).  These are struck using a positive and negative die that fit together; this isn't as hard as it sounds, since the positive die is made from a pipe-cap filled with pewter.  The negative die is pushed into the pewter while it is still molten (the die is keyed with file cuts), and then the cap is struck many times to strike up the detail of the die in the pewter.

          -Derian le Breton.




          --
          In service to the dream

          Baron Jon Thomme

          Gold is for the mistress
          Silver for the maid
          Copper for the craftsman cunning in his trade.
          "Good" said the Baron sitting in his hall,
          But iron, cold iron is master of them all.
          R. Kipling
        • Arion the Wanderer
          Nice work. Arion the Wanderer ... From: Brian Ferguson To: sca_moneyer@yahoogroups.com Sent: Friday, April 08, 2011 8:58 AM Subject: [sca_moneyer] Vigil token
          Message 4 of 9 , Apr 8, 2011
            Nice work.
             
            Arion the Wanderer
             
            ----- Original Message -----
            Sent: Friday, April 08, 2011 8:58 AM
            Subject: [sca_moneyer] Vigil token bracteates

             

            Hello all,

            As some of you know, I was put on vigil for the order of the laurel recently.  One tradition here is for the person on vigil to give tokens to those who give him advice.  Being a moneyer, I wanted to provide silver strikes.  Being "frugal" and aware of the current spot price, I wanted to use as little silver as possible!  So, I decided to do a small bracteate ((Fieldless) Four ermine spots conjoined in saltire sable), displayed with the badge of the order ((Tinctureless) A laurel wreath):

            http://www.flickr.com/photos/derianlebreton/5566115367/
            http://www.flickr.com/photos/derianlebreton/5566690814/

            A bracteate is a single-sided coin made of very thin metal (0.2mm in this case, about two sheets of paper).  Since each coin is half an inch in diameter, this works out to be about a third of a gram per coin.  The metal is so thin that it can easily be bent, so bracteate designs often incorporated a stiffening ridge (the thick engraved line just inside the border beading on my coin).  These are struck using a positive and negative die that fit together; this isn't as hard as it sounds, since the positive die is made from a pipe-cap filled with pewter.  The negative die is pushed into the pewter while it is still molten (the die is keyed with file cuts), and then the cap is struck many times to strike up the detail of the die in the pewter.

            -Derian le Breton.

          • Scott McCartney
            Derian, Does Ian Cnule know? alail/scott
            Message 5 of 9 , Apr 8, 2011
              Derian,

              Does Ian Cnule know?


              alail/scott

              On Fri, Apr 8, 2011 at 8:58 AM, Brian Ferguson <derianlebreton@...> wrote:
               

              Hello all,

              As some of you know, I was put on vigil for the order of the laurel recently.  One tradition here is for the person on vigil to give tokens to those who give him advice.  Being a moneyer, I wanted to provide silver strikes.  Being "frugal" and aware of the current spot price, I wanted to use as little silver as possible!  So, I decided to do a small bracteate ((Fieldless) Four ermine spots conjoined in saltire sable), displayed with the badge of the order ((Tinctureless) A laurel wreath):

              http://www.flickr.com/photos/derianlebreton/5566115367/
              http://www.flickr.com/photos/derianlebreton/5566690814/

              A bracteate is a single-sided coin made of very thin metal (0.2mm in this case, about two sheets of paper).  Since each coin is half an inch in diameter, this works out to be about a third of a gram per coin.  The metal is so thin that it can easily be bent, so bracteate designs often incorporated a stiffening ridge (the thick engraved line just inside the border beading on my coin).  These are struck using a positive and negative die that fit together; this isn't as hard as it sounds, since the positive die is made from a pipe-cap filled with pewter.  The negative die is pushed into the pewter while it is still molten (the die is keyed with file cuts), and then the cap is struck many times to strike up the detail of the die in the pewter.

              -Derian le Breton.


            • Brian Ferguson
              Jon Thomme: for moneying :) Arion: Thank you! Alail: He does indeed. Thanks, Derian.
              Message 6 of 9 , Apr 9, 2011
                Jon Thomme: for moneying :)

                Arion: Thank you!

                Alail: He does indeed.

                Thanks,

                Derian.
              • Zino
                Gratzi.
                Message 7 of 9 , Apr 10, 2011
                  Gratzi.

                  --- In sca_moneyer@yahoogroups.com, Brian Ferguson <derianlebreton@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Hello all,
                  >
                  > As some of you know, I was put on vigil for the order of the laurel
                  > recently. One tradition here is for the person on vigil to give tokens to
                  > those who give him advice. Being a moneyer, I wanted to provide silver
                  > strikes. Being "frugal" and aware of the current spot price, I wanted to
                  > use as little silver as possible! So, I decided to do a small bracteate
                  > ((Fieldless) Four ermine spots conjoined in saltire sable), displayed with
                  > the badge of the order ((Tinctureless) A laurel wreath):
                  >
                  > http://www.flickr.com/photos/derianlebreton/5566115367/
                  > http://www.flickr.com/photos/derianlebreton/5566690814/
                  >
                  > A bracteate is a single-sided coin made of very thin metal (0.2mm in this
                  > case, about two sheets of paper). Since each coin is half an inch in
                  > diameter, this works out to be about a third of a gram per coin. The metal
                  > is so thin that it can easily be bent, so bracteate designs often
                  > incorporated a stiffening ridge (the thick engraved line just inside the
                  > border beading on my coin). These are struck using a positive and negative
                  > die that fit together; this isn't as hard as it sounds, since the positive
                  > die is made from a pipe-cap filled with pewter. The negative die is pushed
                  > into the pewter while it is still molten (the die is keyed with file cuts),
                  > and then the cap is struck many times to strike up the detail of the die in
                  > the pewter.
                  >
                  > -Derian le Breton.
                  >
                • EaldredSCA@aol.com
                  Congratulations on the Laurel. And good job on the bracteate. Ealdred of Malmesbury Northshield ... From: Brian Ferguson To:
                  Message 8 of 9 , Apr 10, 2011
                    Congratulations on the Laurel. And good job on the bracteate.
                     
                    Ealdred of Malmesbury
                    Northshield



                    -----Original Message-----
                    From: Brian Ferguson <derianlebreton@...>
                    To: sca_moneyer <sca_moneyer@yahoogroups.com>
                    Sent: Fri, Apr 8, 2011 11:12 am
                    Subject: [sca_moneyer] Vigil token bracteates

                     
                    Hello all,

                    As some of you know, I was put on vigil for the order of the laurel recently.  One tradition here is for the person on vigil to give tokens to those who give him advice.  Being a moneyer, I wanted to provide silver strikes.  Being "frugal" and aware of the current spot price, I wanted to use as little silver as possible!  So, I decided to do a small bracteate ((Fieldless) Four ermine spots conjoined in saltire sable), displayed with the badge of the order ((Tinctureless) A laurel wreath):

                    http://www.flickr.com/photos/derianlebreton/5566115367/
                    http://www.flickr.com/photos/derianlebreton/5566690814/

                    A bracteate is a single-sided coin made of very thin metal (0.2mm in this case, about two sheets of paper).  Since each coin is half an inch in diameter, this works out to be about a third of a gram per coin.  The metal is so thin that it can easily be bent, so bracteate designs often incorporated a stiffening ridge (the thick engraved line just inside the border beading on my coin).  These are struck using a positive and negative die that fit together; this isn't as hard as it sounds, since the positive die is made from a pipe-cap filled with pewter.  The negative die is pushed into the pewter while it is still molten (the die is keyed with file cuts), and then the cap is struck many times to strike up the detail of the die in the pewter.

                    -Derian le Breton.
                  • CT
                    Your bracteates look lovely Derian. Thanks for posting the how-to on doing them. Also - congratulations on the well-deserved impending Laurel. I was fortunate
                    Message 9 of 9 , Apr 11, 2011
                      Your bracteates look lovely Derian. Thanks for posting the how-to on doing them.

                      Also - congratulations on the well-deserved impending Laurel. I was fortunate enough to attend your coin making class on Saturday, and in addition to being very skilled in the craft you were also an excellent teacher. Should you ever offer a class also in making punches, would you please be kind enough to announce it on the Monyer list?

                      Sincerely,

                      Alia la rousse

                      --- In sca_moneyer@yahoogroups.com, Brian Ferguson <derianlebreton@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Hello all,
                      >
                      > As some of you know, I was put on vigil for the order of the laurel
                      > recently. One tradition here is for the person on vigil to give tokens to
                      > those who give him advice. Being a moneyer, I wanted to provide silver
                      > strikes. Being "frugal" and aware of the current spot price, I wanted to
                      > use as little silver as possible! So, I decided to do a small bracteate
                      > ((Fieldless) Four ermine spots conjoined in saltire sable), displayed with
                      > the badge of the order ((Tinctureless) A laurel wreath):
                      >
                      > http://www.flickr.com/photos/derianlebreton/5566115367/
                      > http://www.flickr.com/photos/derianlebreton/5566690814/
                      >
                      > A bracteate is a single-sided coin made of very thin metal (0.2mm in this
                      > case, about two sheets of paper). Since each coin is half an inch in
                      > diameter, this works out to be about a third of a gram per coin. The metal
                      > is so thin that it can easily be bent, so bracteate designs often
                      > incorporated a stiffening ridge (the thick engraved line just inside the
                      > border beading on my coin). These are struck using a positive and negative
                      > die that fit together; this isn't as hard as it sounds, since the positive
                      > die is made from a pipe-cap filled with pewter. The negative die is pushed
                      > into the pewter while it is still molten (the die is keyed with file cuts),
                      > and then the cap is struck many times to strike up the detail of the die in
                      > the pewter.
                      >
                      > -Derian le Breton.
                      >
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