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Re: [sca_moneyer] Re: Hey everyone....

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  • William D. Tilman
    Thanks for all the great advice on getting dies together. I think I m going to go down to my local steel recycling place and see if I can t get some 1
    Message 1 of 14 , Jul 1 7:46 AM
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      Thanks for all the great advice on getting dies together.  I think I'm going to go down to my local steel recycling place and see if I can't get some 1" cold-rolled steel to start with. 
      Next, the actual coin blank, either silver or brass?  Are there places that supply the actual 1" blank?  Or are they punched out of a sheet?
       
      -A
    • Brian Ferguson
      Silver and brass can work, but the vast majority of SCA coinage is made in lead-free pewter (~95% tin). It s relatively cheap, and easy to work. You can make
      Message 2 of 14 , Jul 1 8:55 AM
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        Silver and brass can work, but the vast majority of SCA coinage is made
        in lead-free pewter (~95% tin). It's relatively cheap, and easy to work.

        You can make blanks with just a hammer and an anvil using the "old
        method" described in the moneyers handbook excerpts file (check the
        files section of the list website.) If you're doing serious production
        though, using a rolling mill to make sheet will speed things up
        tremendously. You can also buy pewter sheet, but it's significantly
        more expensive.

        -Derian.

        > Thanks for all the great advice on getting dies together. I think I'm
        > going to go down to my local steel recycling place and see if I can't
        > get some 1" cold-rolled steel to start with.
        > Next, the actual coin blank, either silver or brass? Are there places
        > that supply the actual 1" blank? Or are they punched out of a sheet?
        >
        > -A
      • klessig
        ... porosity. I I would really tend to doubt it. Such prosity would be evident wen cutting or machining. I have never ever seen such when working steel. [And
        Message 3 of 14 , Jul 1 11:55 PM
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          >, I think I know what the depression stuff is. It's
          porosity. I

          I would really tend to doubt it. Such prosity would be evident wen
          cutting or machining. I have never ever seen such when working steel.
          [And drill rod would be no less or more likely to have such. . It
          would also not likely be radially symmetric. I would expect different
          density at different locations.
        • klessig
          ... I would recommend staying away from brass until you have more experience, and then staying away from it any way. A bitch to strike well, been there done
          Message 4 of 14 , Jul 2 12:01 AM
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            >Next, the actual coin blank, either silver or brass?

            I would recommend staying away from brass until you have more
            experience, and then staying away from it any way. A bitch to strike
            well, been there done that.

            Silver is EXCELLENT stuff to strike. but pricey.
            If you want to do silver, there are several places that will sell you
            either sterling or fine silver discs [Mettaliferous is the one I use
            when I need it, and a feeling lazy] I recommend fine.


            The west kingdom guild can (and will sell you pewter blanks. I will
            have some at Pennsic.
          • Bart Saxton
            I second the comments on brass. It s not much fun. Hard to anneal with my supply of tools. And even store bought annealled stock is too hard for me to get good
            Message 5 of 14 , Jul 2 7:37 AM
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              I second the comments on brass. It's not much fun. Hard to anneal with
              my supply of tools. And even store bought annealled stock is too hard
              for me to get good clean strikes from. Pain in the neck.

              bart
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