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East Kingdom Brew U

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  • Sylvia Ferrell
    Greetings! First, allow me to appologize to those who are receiving this note more than once. We are trying to reach a wide audience quickly. Mistress Suzanne
    Message 1 of 12 , Feb 14, 2012
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      Greetings!
       
      First, allow me to appologize to those who are receiving this note more than once.  We are trying to reach a wide audience quickly.
       
      Mistress Suzanne de Londres, together with the Shire of Endewearde, are working to organize a Brew U event for the East Kingdom.  The event will take place on Saturday, March 31st, with some informal happenings Sunday Morning on April 1st.
       
       
      There are several places you can find information.
       
      First, the event announcement can be found here:
       
      If you happen to be on Facebook, you can find the same information, plus chatter about the event here:
       
      If you are planning to attend AND you have a Facebook account, please click on the "going" button so we know to expect you.  This will help our autocrat and food stewards plan accordingly. 
       
       
      The class list and schedule are being developed and will be publicized as soon as it is firmed up.  You are encouraged to bring a cot and spend the night at the site.  If you prefer things like showers and real beds, you will want to make accommodations in nearby hotels. 
       
      Please consider attending this event done for brewers by brewers!
       
      Sincerely,
      Lady Sylvia du Vey
      Shire of Endewearde
       
       
    • ludwig
      Here s a question... Nowaday, I have move to mainly all grain brew. Now, cracking the grain, put then in water, set the proper temperature, wait at specifics
      Message 2 of 12 , Mar 1, 2012
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        Here's a question...

        Nowaday, I have move to 'mainly' all grain brew. Now, cracking the
        grain, put then in water, set the proper temperature, wait at specifics
        temperatures about 90 minutes.
        Then start boiling and adding hops: Overall, around 4hours with the
        cleanup, waiting and everything.

        Now, 4 hours in a row is sometime a stretch. So I was considering this,
        I like to know if anyone has done it or know about this.

        Do the whole mashing process and extract the wort... THEN store it in
        the fridge and wait a few days before using it in boiling.

        My instinct told me it should be OK. However, there is so much thing
        happening in mashing/wort at various temperature...

        So that the question: Can I cold down the wort then put it in the fridge
        for a few days before using it, without having it change ?


        Ludwig
      • ludwig
        Yep, two questions on the same day, hope I am not busting any limit ;-) I need to brew with berries offseason (and specifically in a brew book, I have mention
        Message 3 of 12 , Mar 1, 2012
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          Yep, two questions on the same day, hope I am not busting any limit ;-)

          I need to brew with berries offseason (and specifically in a brew book,
          I have mention of using dehydrated berries in a recipe)
          Looking around, I do find various dried/dehydrated berry at local
          grocery and many other places

          Now, I look at the ingredients and in the best of case, no chemical and
          it read: TheBerry, sugar, sunflower oil.

          I don't mind about trace of sugar, however, I am not quite sure about
          'sunflower oil'.
          The only time I have brew with 'oil' (comming out of nuts put in a batch
          of mead), it has turn out as a disaster... (oil at the surface turn
          awfull..)

          So, your opinion, anyone has brew with dry up berries containing trace
          of oil? any problems?

          Ludwig
        • William Wagers
          I wouldn t, unless you can guarantee you won t get something growing in it after a few days in your fridge... Besides, part of the fun of brewing is scheduling
          Message 4 of 12 , Mar 1, 2012
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            I wouldn't, unless you can guarantee you won't get something growing in it after a few days in your fridge...  

            Besides, part of the fun of brewing is scheduling time to get your brewing friends to come hang out with you while you make a batch -- if you have multiple burners, you can even do two or more batches at a time! I occasionally have brewers meet at my house, and we have turned out as many as six beverages in about 4-6 hours.  It's worth every second of time, for sure!

            Peace!
            William Brewer

            On Thu, Mar 1, 2012 at 7:53 PM, ludwig <Ludwig@...> wrote:
             

            Here's a question...

            Nowaday, I have move to 'mainly' all grain brew. Now, cracking the
            grain, put then in water, set the proper temperature, wait at specifics
            temperatures about 90 minutes.
            Then start boiling and adding hops: Overall, around 4hours with the
            cleanup, waiting and everything.

            Now, 4 hours in a row is sometime a stretch. So I was considering this,
            I like to know if anyone has done it or know about this.

            Do the whole mashing process and extract the wort... THEN store it in
            the fridge and wait a few days before using it in boiling.

            My instinct told me it should be OK. However, there is so much thing
            happening in mashing/wort at various temperature...

            So that the question: Can I cold down the wort then put it in the fridge
            for a few days before using it, without having it change ?

            Ludwig




            --
            Rank avails you nothing
            Honor gains you friends
            Friends are a wealth that does not tarnish.
          • Cranium@san.rr.com
            The dried fruit with sunflower oil is no good for ANYTHING in my book (including eating). They do it to keep the fruit softer and more esthetically
            Message 5 of 12 , Mar 1, 2012
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              The "dried" fruit with sunflower oil is no good for ANYTHING in my book (including eating). They do it to keep the fruit softer and more esthetically appealing. And yes it will cause you problems with brewing. You would want dehydrated or freeze dried. If you have a Trader Joes in your area they have fantastic freeze dried fruit, I have been planning on doing some things with the blueberries....

              Jason

              ---- ludwig <Ludwig@...> wrote:
              > Yep, two questions on the same day, hope I am not busting any limit ;-)
              >
              > I need to brew with berries offseason (and specifically in a brew book,
              > I have mention of using dehydrated berries in a recipe)
              > Looking around, I do find various dried/dehydrated berry at local
              > grocery and many other places
              >
              > Now, I look at the ingredients and in the best of case, no chemical and
              > it read: TheBerry, sugar, sunflower oil.
              >
              > I don't mind about trace of sugar, however, I am not quite sure about
              > 'sunflower oil'.
              > The only time I have brew with 'oil' (comming out of nuts put in a batch
              > of mead), it has turn out as a disaster... (oil at the surface turn
              > awfull..)
              >
              > So, your opinion, anyone has brew with dry up berries containing trace
              > of oil? any problems?
              >
              > Ludwig
              >
              >
              >
              > ------------------------------------
              >
              > Yahoo! Groups Links
              >
              >
              >
            • Gy. G. R. Dioguardi
              I ve never thought of using dryed fruit. I probably would have, but after reading all this, now I never will. ~ I ve only use fresh fruit, or fresh fruit
              Message 6 of 12 , Mar 1, 2012
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                I've never thought of using 'dryed' fruit.  I probably would have, but after reading all this, now I never will.  ~  I've only use fresh fruit, or fresh fruit that was flash frozen.

                Would RAISINS react the way of the dried fruit?

                Baroné Francesco
                + Bish

                ===

                On 1 March 2012, at 11:09 PM, <Cranium@...> <Cranium@...> wrote:

                 

                The "dried" fruit with sunflower oil is no good for ANYTHING in my book (including eating). They do it to keep the fruit softer and more esthetically appealing. And yes it will cause you problems with brewing. You would want dehydrated or freeze dried. If you have a Trader Joes in your area they have fantastic freeze dried fruit, I have been planning on doing some things with the blueberries....

                Jason

                ---- ludwig <Ludwig@...> wrote:
                > Yep, two questions on the same day, hope I am not busting any limit ;-)
                >
                > I need to brew with berries offseason (and specifically in a brew book,
                > I have mention of using dehydrated berries in a recipe)
                > Looking around, I do find various dried/dehydrated berry at local
                > grocery and many other places
                >
                > Now, I look at the ingredients and in the best of case, no chemical and
                > it read: TheBerry, sugar, sunflower oil.
                >
                > I don't mind about trace of sugar, however, I am not quite sure about
                > 'sunflower oil'.
                > The only time I have brew with 'oil' (comming out of nuts put in a batch
                > of mead), it has turn out as a disaster... (oil at the surface turn
                > awfull..)
                >
                > So, your opinion, anyone has brew with dry up berries containing trace
                > of oil? any problems?
                >
                > Ludwig
                >
                >
                >
                > ------------------------------------
                >
                > Yahoo! Groups Links
                >
                >
                >


              • Ben Paton
                It does not work as the enzime keep on working as they are not denatured. You need to raise the mash temp above 80°C to stop the enzimes from working. There
                Message 7 of 12 , Mar 1, 2012
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                  It does not work as the enzime keep on working as they are not denatured. You need to raise the mash temp above 80°C to stop the enzimes from working. There is no problems with infection as you are going to boil it later. The split boil and mash is the Holy Grail of brewing.

                  Cheers
                  Rurik

                  On Mar 2, 2012 1:53 PM, "William Wagers" <carthax@...> wrote:
                   

                  I wouldn't, unless you can guarantee you won't get something growing in it after a few days in your fridge...  


                  Besides, part of the fun of brewing is scheduling time to get your brewing friends to come hang out with you while you make a batch -- if you have multiple burners, you can even do two or more batches at a time! I occasionally have brewers meet at my house, and we have turned out as many as six beverages in about 4-6 hours.  It's worth every second of time, for sure!

                  Peace!
                  William Brewer

                  On Thu, Mar 1, 2012 at 7:53 PM, ludwig <Ludwig@...> wrote:
                   

                  Here's a question...

                  Nowaday, I have move to 'mainly' all grain brew. Now, cracking the
                  grain, put then in water, set the proper temperature, wait at specifics
                  temperatures about 90 minutes.
                  Then start boiling and adding hops: Overall, around 4hours with the
                  cleanup, waiting and everything.

                  Now, 4 hours in a row is sometime a stretch. So I was considering this,
                  I like to know if anyone has done it or know about this.

                  Do the whole mashing process and extract the wort... THEN store it in
                  the fridge and wait a few days before using it in boiling.

                  My instinct told me it should be OK. However, there is so much thing
                  happening in mashing/wort at various temperature...

                  So that the question: Can I cold down the wort then put it in the fridge
                  for a few days before using it, without having it change ?

                  Ludwig




                  --
                  Rank avails you nothing
                  Honor gains you friends
                  Friends are a wealth that does not tarnish.
                • Cranium@san.rr.com
                  nothing wrong with traditional dried fruit, its the new more processed plump looking stuff thats junk. The stuff you get from a health food store that is
                  Message 8 of 12 , Mar 1, 2012
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                    nothing wrong with traditional dried fruit, its the new more processed plump looking stuff thats junk. The stuff you get from a health food store that is actually dry is fine.

                    Jason

                    ---- "Gy. G. R. Dioguardi" <baronbish@...> wrote:
                    > I've never thought of using 'dryed' fruit. I probably would have, but after reading all this, now I never will. ~ I've only use fresh fruit, or fresh fruit that was flash frozen.
                    >
                    > Would RAISINS react the way of the dried fruit?
                    >
                    > Baroné Francesco
                    > + Bish
                    >
                    > ===
                    >
                    > On 1 March 2012, at 11:09 PM, <Cranium@...> <Cranium@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > > The "dried" fruit with sunflower oil is no good for ANYTHING in my book (including eating). They do it to keep the fruit softer and more esthetically appealing. And yes it will cause you problems with brewing. You would want dehydrated or freeze dried. If you have a Trader Joes in your area they have fantastic freeze dried fruit, I have been planning on doing some things with the blueberries....
                    > >
                    > > Jason
                    > >
                    > > ---- ludwig <Ludwig@...> wrote:
                    > > > Yep, two questions on the same day, hope I am not busting any limit ;-)
                    > > >
                    > > > I need to brew with berries offseason (and specifically in a brew book,
                    > > > I have mention of using dehydrated berries in a recipe)
                    > > > Looking around, I do find various dried/dehydrated berry at local
                    > > > grocery and many other places
                    > > >
                    > > > Now, I look at the ingredients and in the best of case, no chemical and
                    > > > it read: TheBerry, sugar, sunflower oil.
                    > > >
                    > > > I don't mind about trace of sugar, however, I am not quite sure about
                    > > > 'sunflower oil'.
                    > > > The only time I have brew with 'oil' (comming out of nuts put in a batch
                    > > > of mead), it has turn out as a disaster... (oil at the surface turn
                    > > > awfull..)
                    > > >
                    > > > So, your opinion, anyone has brew with dry up berries containing trace
                    > > > of oil? any problems?
                    > > >
                    > > > Ludwig
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > > ------------------------------------
                    > > >
                    > > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > >
                    >
                  • Scott Mills
                    ... I am sorry but that is plain wrong. It does matter. Boiling would kill any microbes that have started to grow in the wort but it would not magically
                    Message 9 of 12 , Mar 1, 2012
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                      On 3/1/2012 10:46 PM, Ben Paton wrote:   There is no problems with infection as you are going to boil it later.

                      I am sorry but that is plain wrong.  It does matter.

                      Boiling would kill any microbes that have started to grow in the wort  but it would not magically remove any off flavors, aromas, or toxins they have produced. 

                      If you take spoiled food and boil it that doesn't suddenly make it good or even safe.

                      When you ea



                    • Tadhg
                      Raisins are different and bring a different flavor. Not bad, just different. Myself, I make raisin wine periodically for Roman cooking. It s unique. ...but
                      Message 10 of 12 , Mar 2, 2012
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                        Raisins are different and bring a different flavor. Not bad, just different.

                        Myself, I make raisin wine periodically for Roman cooking. It's unique.

                        ...but don't expect it to give you grape.
                        Tadhg
                        ...brick by brick
                        Sent via BlackBerry by AT&T

                        From: "Gy. G. R. Dioguardi" <baronbish@...>
                        Sender: sca_brew@yahoogroups.com
                        Date: Thu, 1 Mar 2012 23:29:02 -0500
                        To: <sca_brew@yahoogroups.com>
                        ReplyTo: sca_brew@yahoogroups.com
                        Subject: Re: [SCA_Brew] trace of oil in mead ingredients ?

                         

                        I've never thought of using 'dryed' fruit.  I probably would have, but after reading all this, now I never will.  ~  I've only use fresh fruit, or fresh fruit that was flash frozen.


                        Would RAISINS react the way of the dried fruit?

                        Baroné Francesco
                        + Bish

                        ===

                        On 1 March 2012, at 11:09 PM, <Cranium@...> <Cranium@...> wrote:

                         

                        The "dried" fruit with sunflower oil is no good for ANYTHING in my book (including eating). They do it to keep the fruit softer and more esthetically appealing. And yes it will cause you problems with brewing. You would want dehydrated or freeze dried. If you have a Trader Joes in your area they have fantastic freeze dried fruit, I have been planning on doing some things with the blueberries....

                        Jason

                        ---- ludwig <Ludwig@...> wrote:
                        > Yep, two questions on the same day, hope I am not busting any limit ;-)
                        >
                        > I need to brew with berries offseason (and specifically in a brew book,
                        > I have mention of using dehydrated berries in a recipe)
                        > Looking around, I do find various dried/dehydrated berry at local
                        > grocery and many other places
                        >
                        > Now, I look at the ingredients and in the best of case, no chemical and
                        > it read: TheBerry, sugar, sunflower oil.
                        >
                        > I don't mind about trace of sugar, however, I am not quite sure about
                        > 'sunflower oil'.
                        > The only time I have brew with 'oil' (comming out of nuts put in a batch
                        > of mead), it has turn out as a disaster... (oil at the surface turn
                        > awfull..)
                        >
                        > So, your opinion, anyone has brew with dry up berries containing trace
                        > of oil? any problems?
                        >
                        > Ludwig
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > ------------------------------------
                        >
                        > Yahoo! Groups Links
                        >
                        >
                        >


                      • Ludwig@megaquebec.net
                        Thank all for the input, and the few specifics.. the bring it over 80C once to stop everything is pretty much what I was looking for. And don t worry, I will
                        Message 11 of 12 , Mar 2, 2012
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                          Thank all for the input, and the few specifics.. the 'bring it over 80C once to stop everything" is pretty much what I was looking for.

                          And don't worry, I will kept doing the wort and boiling immediately after 98% of the time.

                          So, bring it over 80 C, then cool down to 4C rapidly (try outdoor, winter in Québec: I expect under 1 hours) then fridge. I  promess to never left it in the fridge more than 1,2 or 3 days at most (Anyway, it's gonna take a lot of space).  I will reboil everything after obviously.

                          Ludwig



                          On Sat 03/ 3/12 02:09 , Ben Paton ben.paton@... sent:

                          If you can find a bug that is going to produce enough esters that you can taste or smell between -2 and 4°c I would be surprised, especially if the wort is brought down to that temp quickly ( say from 50°c to -2° c in less than six hours) .Further there is no microbe that lives in beer wort that can produce a toxin that will hurt you, it was why fermented liquids were concidered safe before an understanding of pasturisastion.  In other food products this is not the case.

                          I would not recomend doing this by the way as I think it would make an inferior beer.  This is why we now produce the mash then stablise the wort after.

                          This has not always been the case, in some of the older recipes you can see the hops being boiled then the liquor being mashed with. Then once this is done the resulting beverage was left to slowly cool down and spontaneously ferment. This can be seen in digby, shati from Finland and ale from Gotland. Why would they do this if it made them sick? It might not taste good to you and I but they would not have done this if it made them sick.

                          Rurik
                          Who has worked in a homebrew shop, in a commercial brewery and holds mundane brewing qulifications.

                          PS I would not recomend doing this by the way as I think it would make an inferior beer.

                          On Mar 2, 2012 6:20 PM, "Scott Mills" <b.scott.mills@...> wrote:
                           

                          On 3/1/2012 10:46 PM, Ben Paton wrote:

                            There is no problems with infection as you are going to boil it later.

                          I am sorry but that is plain wrong.  It does matter.

                          Boiling would kill any microbes that have started to grow in the wort  but it would not magically remove any off flavors, aromas, or toxins they have produced. 

                          If you take spoiled food and boil it that doesn't suddenly make it good or even safe.

                          When you ea



                        • Ben Paton
                          If you can find a bug that is going to produce enough esters that you can taste or smell between -2 and 4°c I would be surprised, especially if the wort is
                          Message 12 of 12 , Mar 2, 2012
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                            If you can find a bug that is going to produce enough esters that you can taste or smell between -2 and 4°c I would be surprised, especially if the wort is brought down to that temp quickly ( say from 50°c to -2° c in less than six hours) .Further there is no microbe that lives in beer wort that can produce a toxin that will hurt you, it was why fermented liquids were concidered safe before an understanding of pasturisastion.  In other food products this is not the case.

                            I would not recomend doing this by the way as I think it would make an inferior beer.  This is why we now produce the mash then stablise the wort after.

                            This has not always been the case, in some of the older recipes you can see the hops being boiled then the liquor being mashed with. Then once this is done the resulting beverage was left to slowly cool down and spontaneously ferment. This can be seen in digby, shati from Finland and ale from Gotland. Why would they do this if it made them sick? It might not taste good to you and I but they would not have done this if it made them sick.

                            Rurik
                            Who has worked in a homebrew shop, in a commercial brewery and holds mundane brewing qulifications.

                            PS I would not recomend doing this by the way as I think it would make an inferior beer.

                            On Mar 2, 2012 6:20 PM, "Scott Mills" <b.scott.mills@...> wrote:
                             

                            On 3/1/2012 10:46 PM, Ben Paton wrote:

                              There is no problems with infection as you are going to boil it later.

                            I am sorry but that is plain wrong.  It does matter.

                            Boiling would kill any microbes that have started to grow in the wort  but it would not magically remove any off flavors, aromas, or toxins they have produced. 

                            If you take spoiled food and boil it that doesn't suddenly make it good or even safe.

                            When you ea



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