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Re: Filtering Cordials

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  • jehannettedelille
    I use a flour sack towel over a large funnel for all of my brewing and cooking filtering. Finer than cheesecloth and squishable (technical term!). However, I
    Message 1 of 36 , Nov 1, 2011
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      I use a flour sack towel over a large funnel for all of my brewing and cooking filtering. Finer than cheesecloth and squishable (technical term!). However, I have found that there is a certain amount of particulate that only goes away with settling, and essentially, I rack off my cordials just like I do mead.

      Hope this helps,
      Jehannette
    • Carraig Mac Cosgraigh
      Heating up a honey/water mix to pasteurize the batch has the side benefit of breaking down the proteins and bubbling them up as a white froth.   Removing the
      Message 36 of 36 , Nov 7, 2011
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        Heating up a honey/water mix to pasteurize the batch has the side benefit of breaking down the proteins and bubbling them up as a white froth.   Removing the froth as the batch cooks on the stove helps to eliminate protein haze in the final product.  All period recipes that I known of involve boiling the honey with part of the water to clean off the scum/froth that forms on the top.  Most modern meadmakers only heat the honey/water mix to a high enough temperature to kill off native yeasts.  The meadmakers in the "cook" camp tend to argue that you can't get mead to clear without cooking.  Meadmakers (like me) in the "no cook" camp argue that you're boiling off all the aromatic compounds that make honey so wonderful.

        I rarely had problems getting melomels to clear off.  But I could never get a straight mead to clear up as well as a melomel. 

        Cionaodh




        From: sorchaprechan <ebpayne@...>
        To: sca_brew@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Monday, November 7, 2011 5:57 AM
        Subject: [SCA_Brew] Re: Filtering beers/meads/cordials

         
        Just about all the mundane meadmakers I know don't cook their honey, and having trouble clearing mead or wine has never come up. What do you all think is going on here? Off the top of my head, heat is for pasteurization, not clarity (unless you're adding Irish moss at the end of a beer).

        Sorcha Crowe
        Atlantia
        (I compete mundanely in mead and wine quite a lot)

        --- In sca_brew@yahoogroups.com, Carraig Mac Cosgraigh <carraig1014@...> wrote:
        >
        > I've been making mead since the middle of 2003.  I am one of the minority no-cook mead makers, so I have struggled at times to get traditional mead and a few melomels to clear up.  I have also been making wine since about 2008.
        >
        >



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