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Sparkling cyser

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  • Dorris Adams
    I accidently sparkled a batch of cyser. I enjoy the taste very much, but don t feel safe with the bottles that I have used (glass granades). Can anyone
    Message 1 of 5 , Jan 1, 2007
      I accidently "sparkled" a batch of cyser.  I enjoy the taste very much, but don't feel safe with the bottles that I have used (glass granades).  Can anyone tell me how to safely "sparkle" 1 gallon batches of cyser and other malomels?  Would like to try sparkling a bluberry and a persimmon that are about 4 months into their second fermentation.   Petronella

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    • henrybalsac
      Petronella I don t feel qualified to tell you how to sparkle a gallon batch of anything.... I can share that when I feel uncomfortable about a possible
      Message 2 of 5 , Jan 1, 2007
        Petronella
        I don't feel qualified to tell you how to "sparkle" a gallon batch of
        anything....
        I can share that when I feel uncomfortable about a possible "glass
        gernade" I store those bottles in a spare camping cooler. Mostly
        because I'm lazy and don't want to clean the ceilings and walls and
        shelves and floor etc etc (AGAIN) ...of my precious fermentables and
        glass shareds.
        The cooler keeps the bottles at as stable a temprature as they are
        going to get in my house, and IF they do blow.... the mess and the
        colateral damage are contained in a easy to rinse (or dispose of)
        vessal.
        When ever possible use champagne bottles.

        cheers
        HBD


        --- In sca_brew@yahoogroups.com, Dorris Adams
        <petronelladepoitier@...> wrote:
        >
        > I accidently "sparkled" a batch of cyser. I enjoy the taste very
        much, but don't feel safe with the bottles that I have used (glass
        granades). Can anyone tell me how to safely "sparkle" 1 gallon
        batches of cyser and other malomels? Would like to try sparkling a
        bluberry and a persimmon that are about 4 months into their second
        fermentation. Petronella
        > __________________________________________________
      • Iain mac an Bhaird
        ... Bottle them in beer (which range from 12oz on up to 3 liters) or champagne/sparkling wine bottles. Then you don t have to worry about the glass
        Message 3 of 5 , Jan 1, 2007
          >Can anyone tell me how to safely "sparkle" 1 gallon batches of cyser
          >and other malomels?

          Bottle them in beer (which range from 12oz on up to 3 liters) or
          champagne/sparkling wine bottles. Then you don't have to worry about
          the "glass grenades".

          In this case, it sounds like you got some carbonation from bottling a
          little early. You could try that method again, but it's not really
          all that accurate (unless of course, you've made these batches many
          times before and know exactly when they tend to finish). Usually
          carbonation is intentionally introduced by adding a measured amount
          of additional fermentables during bottling. For most of my beers I
          do this by adding 3/4 cups of corn sugar (made into a syrup) to a
          5gal batch. I have not intentionally carbonated any of my meads or
          wines yet so I can't give you specific guidelines, but I imagine you
          might want to use just a little less. Obviously, if you are only
          doing 1 gallon you'll need to scale these measurements down as well.

          3/4 c of corn sugar is roughly equivalent to 1 1/4 c dry malt
          extract, 1 c honey or molasses, 2/3 c brown sugar, or 1 1/2 c maple syrup.

          Have fun!
          -Iain
        • lordship@comcast.net
          beer bottles and champagne bottles will both safely hold carbonated beverage. Both will also take a standard bottle cap. --Madoc
          Message 4 of 5 , Jan 1, 2007
            beer bottles and champagne bottles will both safely hold carbonated
            beverage. Both will also take a standard bottle cap. --Madoc

            At 10:06 AM 1/1/2007, you wrote:

            >I accidently "sparkled" a batch of cyser. I enjoy the taste very
            >much, but don't feel safe with the bottles that I have used (glass
            >granades). Can anyone tell me how to safely "sparkle" 1 gallon
            >batches of cyser and other malomels? Would like to try sparkling a
            >bluberry and a persimmon that are about 4 months into their second
            >fermentation. Petronella
          • lordship@comcast.net
            There are three ways to safely sparkle a cider. One is to keg it and force carbonate it. Another is to bottle condition the same as you would a beer, with
            Message 5 of 5 , Jan 1, 2007
              There are three ways to safely sparkle a cider. One is to keg it and
              force carbonate it. Another is to bottle condition the same as you
              would a beer, with priming sugar. This will of course leave a similar
              residue in the bottom of the bottle. The third way is to bottle
              condition in upside-down champagne bottles. If you want to try the
              third technique, I don't recommend using beer bottles.

              For the third technique, you would use priming sugar just as you
              would for regular bottle conditioning, but use a champagne bottle.
              Cap the bottles with standard bottle caps, and place them upside-down
              in a rack of some kind. For this, I use a large cardboard box full of
              Styrofoam peanuts. As the bottle builds carbonation, yeast sediment
              will collect in the neck of thebottle. Every couple of days, give
              each bottle a few spins to loosen the yeast and allow it to settle
              directly on the bottle cap. After several weeks of conditioning, you
              should have about half-inch sediment layer on the cap, with a low
              risk of additional sediment forming.

              In a separate container (I use a 2-gallon galvanized steel bucket),
              mix up a slurry of chopped/crushed ice and rock salt. Take each
              bottle, being careful not to disturb the sediment, and place it in
              the ice slurry about two or three inches in - just enough to make
              sure the yeast is completely submerged and the bottle will not shift
              as the ice melts. What will happen is the yeast will partially freeze
              while the alcohol in the liquid will prevent the beverage from
              freezing. After a few hours (about half the ice melt), take each
              bottle out, carefully right-side it, and pop the bottle cap off. The
              pressure built up underneath the yeast plug will cause it to push out
              of the neck. Knock it aside, hammer in the champagne cork, and wire
              it down quickly before the CO2 comes out of solution. You should see
              little to no sediment forming after that, and you have clear,
              carbonated cider/wine/mead.

              I've used the technique twice - once on a gallon test batch and once
              on a 6-gallon batch of sparkling wine I made for Y2K. It worked well
              both times. --Madoc

              At 11:12 AM 1/1/2007, you wrote:

              >Petronella
            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.