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RE: [SCA_Brew] Apple Beer

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  • David Gillam
    Id love any recipes I can get, Beer, Cider or anything else drinkable. Anybody know an easy/cheep way to do rootbeers? I know their not period, but the little
    Message 1 of 18 , Aug 1, 2006
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      Id love any recipes I can get, Beer, Cider or anything else drinkable. Anybody know an easy/cheep way to do rootbeers? I know their not period, but the little ones want something to drink around the fire when the homebrew makes its rounds. I thought that RB might be nice, but to make a non-kit version, the sassafras extract was $20 for a small 3oz bottle.

       


      From: sca_brew@yahoogroups.com [mailto: sca_brew@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of Daphnebd@...
      Sent: Friday, July 14, 2006 10:54 AM
      To: sca_brew@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: [SCA_Brew] Apple Beer

       

      This is one of the joys of cider making that I like to talk about, because I have learned/ am learning a lot about apples. :-)  I am still very much an amateur brewer! 

       Most soft apple ciders (including concentrates) are made with dessert apples; ones that are usually very sweet and juicey, but tend to be lower in tanins (bitter flavors) and malic acid (tartness).  The tanins and acids are what give an apple that nice apple flavor. Go to your local store and buy a bunch of different apples and taste test them. Using a combination of tart apples and sweet dessert apples is what you need to make a good hard cider.  You can still make a good cider using already pressed cider, you just have to be picky about what quality you use.  Don't use anything that has been additive pasteurized.  I also don't use any ciders that are clear.  And try to steer away from white sugar.  That stuff is processed so much it no longer resembles its original form.  Raw sugar or honey is what I use.

      During first stage fermentation, when the yeast is actively converting the sugar to alcohol (&other by products), you will lose a lot of the dessert apple flavor with the sweetness.  Sometimes during second stage fermentation, or even after being bottled, if the right bacteria is present, than malolactic fermentation can occur, in which the malic acid is converted into a more buttery tasting lactic acid.  The bacteria is natural; it is not something that can be controlled by sterilization.  There are ways to halt this, but I'm not real familiar with the use of sulfites, or heat pasteurization.  I plan on trying heat pasteurization for next War of the Lilies.  The dang heat there takes a beating on my ciders, even if they are kept on ice.  

      What I recommend is that if you want to make this batch more palatable, then you can rack it off the lees, add a couple more cans of concentrate to regain that apple taste, some priming sugar, bottle or keg it, and serve soon.  Its a cheaters way, but will result in a drinkable cider. 

      If you'd like some recipes or pointers on making cider, I'll be happy to share.

      Dafne

       

      david.gillam@... writes:

    • leaking pen
      http://www.americanspice.com/catalog/item-20157.html?SEARCH=3&WORDS=root%2Bbeer%2Bextract&orig=30&PAGE=&_ssess_=9915e6d6903109e14679ee74fa5678c6 simplest way,
      Message 2 of 18 , Aug 1, 2006
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        simplest way, you can get root beer artificial flavoring real cheap, toss it into water and sugar in the recommended amounts into one of those big orange spigot coolers, mix well, and toss about 5 pounds of dry ice in large chunks in.  leave the lid loosish, so that it does pressurize a bit, but can escape.  wait an hour.  its now cold and sparkling.

         
        On 8/1/06, David Gillam <david.gillam@...> wrote:

        Id love any recipes I can get, Beer, Cider or anything else drinkable. Anybody know an easy/cheep way to do rootbeers? I know their not period, but the little ones want something to drink around the fire when the homebrew makes its rounds. I thought that RB might be nice, but to make a non-kit version, the sassafras extract was $20 for a small 3oz bottle.

         


        From: sca_brew@yahoogroup s.com [mailto:sca_brew@yahoogroup s.com] On Behalf Of Daphnebd@...
        Sent: Friday, July 14, 2006 10:54 AM


        To: sca_brew@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [SCA_Brew] Apple Beer

         

        This is one of the joys of cider making that I like to talk about, because I have learned/ am learning a lot about apples. :-)  I am still very much an amateur brewer! 

         Most soft apple ciders (including concentrates) are made with dessert apples; ones that are usually very sweet and juicey, but tend to be lower in tanins (bitter flavors) and malic acid (tartness).  The tanins and acids are what give an apple that nice apple flavor. Go to your local store and buy a bunch of different apples and taste test them. Using a combination of tart apples and sweet dessert apples is what you need to make a good hard cider.  You can still make a good cider using already pressed cider, you just have to be picky about what quality you use.  Don't use anything that has been additive pasteurized.  I also don't use any ciders that are clear.  And try to steer away from white sugar.  That stuff is processed so much it no longer resembles its original form.  Raw sugar or honey is what I use.

        During first stage fermentation, when the yeast is actively converting the sugar to alcohol (&other by products), you will lose a lot of the dessert apple flavor with the sweetness.  Sometimes during second stage fermentation, or even after being bottled, if the right bacteria is present, than malolactic fermentation can occur, in which the malic acid is converted into a more buttery tasting lactic acid.  The bacteria is natural; it is not something that can be controlled by sterilization.  There are ways to halt this, but I'm not real familiar with the use of sulfites, or heat pasteurization.  I plan on trying heat pasteurization for next War of the Lilies.  The dang heat there takes a beating on my ciders, even if they are kept on ice.  

        What I recommend is that if you want to make this batch more palatable, then you can rack it off the lees, add a couple more cans of concentrate to regain that apple taste, some priming sugar, bottle or keg it, and serve soon.  Its a cheaters way, but will result in a drinkable cider. 

        If you'd like some recipes or pointers on making cider, I'll be happy to share.

        Dafne

         

        david.gillam@ comcast.net writes:




        --
        That which yields isn't always weak.
      • leaking pen
        and... where did you find sassafras extract? fda outlawed it a while back, as it contains a cancer causer. most root beer extracts today are wintergreen. ...
        Message 3 of 18 , Aug 1, 2006
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          and... where did you find sassafras extract?  fda outlawed it a while back, as it contains a cancer causer.  most root beer extracts today are wintergreen.

          On 8/1/06, leaking pen <itsatrap@...> wrote:
           
          simplest way, you can get root beer artificial flavoring real cheap, toss it into water and sugar in the recommended amounts into one of those big orange spigot coolers, mix well, and toss about 5 pounds of dry ice in large chunks in.  leave the lid loosish, so that it does pressurize a bit, but can escape.  wait an hour.  its now cold and sparkling.

           
          On 8/1/06, David Gillam < david.gillam@...> wrote:

          Id love any recipes I can get, Beer, Cider or anything else drinkable. Anybody know an easy/cheep way to do rootbeers? I know their not period, but the little ones want something to drink around the fire when the homebrew makes its rounds. I thought that RB might be nice, but to make a non-kit version, the sassafras extract was $20 for a small 3oz bottle.

           


          From: sca_brew@yahoogroup s.com [mailto: sca_brew@yahoogroup s.com] On Behalf Of Daphnebd@...


          Sent: Friday, July 14, 2006 10:54 AM


          To: sca_brew@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [SCA_Brew] Apple Beer

           

          This is one of the joys of cider making that I like to talk about, because I have learned/ am learning a lot about apples. :-)  I am still very much an amateur brewer! 

           Most soft apple ciders (including concentrates) are made with dessert apples; ones that are usually very sweet and juicey, but tend to be lower in tanins (bitter flavors) and malic acid (tartness).  The tanins and acids are what give an apple that nice apple flavor. Go to your local store and buy a bunch of different apples and taste test them. Using a combination of tart apples and sweet dessert apples is what you need to make a good hard cider.  You can still make a good cider using already pressed cider, you just have to be picky about what quality you use.  Don't use anything that has been additive pasteurized.  I also don't use any ciders that are clear.  And try to steer away from white sugar.  That stuff is processed so much it no longer resembles its original form.  Raw sugar or honey is what I use.

          During first stage fermentation, when the yeast is actively converting the sugar to alcohol (&other by products), you will lose a lot of the dessert apple flavor with the sweetness.  Sometimes during second stage fermentation, or even after being bottled, if the right bacteria is present, than malolactic fermentation can occur, in which the malic acid is converted into a more buttery tasting lactic acid.  The bacteria is natural; it is not something that can be controlled by sterilization.  There are ways to halt this, but I'm not real familiar with the use of sulfites, or heat pasteurization.  I plan on trying heat pasteurization for next War of the Lilies.  The dang heat there takes a beating on my ciders, even if they are kept on ice.  

          What I recommend is that if you want to make this batch more palatable, then you can rack it off the lees, add a couple more cans of concentrate to regain that apple taste, some priming sugar, bottle or keg it, and serve soon.  Its a cheaters way, but will result in a drinkable cider. 

          If you'd like some recipes or pointers on making cider, I'll be happy to share.

          Dafne

           

          david.gillam@ comcast.net writes:




          --
          That which yields isn't always weak.



          --
          That which yields isn't always weak.
        • NINacide@aol.com
          I d be interesting to do this thing with the dry ice but have a release when the pressure gets too high...maybe something similar to a pressure cooker or the
          Message 4 of 18 , Aug 1, 2006
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            I'd be interesting to do this thing with the dry ice but have a release when the pressure gets too high...maybe something similar to a pressure cooker or the type of valve typical to a steam engine or air compressor.  What I'm saying is a container with a tap or spigot to dispense the drink, and when you make it, you open the top, add ingredients, throw in the dry ice, it carbonates, and the excess pressure is released safely.  then just open the valve and you get your home made fizzy drink with out the danger of co2 bombs.  It would probably jet out of the spigot at first because of the co2 pressure, but then develope a vacuum later on and not dispense the root beer very well.  In that case, you could remove the valve and allow air to come in and that would defeat the vacuum.
          • leaking pen
            no, you just leave the top off. well, not off, put only partly on. that way you have a jet of the co2 coming out the top. ... -- That which yields isn t
            Message 5 of 18 , Aug 1, 2006
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              no, you just leave the top off. well, not off, put only partly on.  that way you have a jet of the co2 coming out the top. 

              On 8/1/06, NINacide@... <NINacide@...> wrote:

              I'd be interesting to do this thing with the dry ice but have a release when the pressure gets too high...maybe something similar to a pressure cooker or the type of valve typical to a steam engine or air compressor.  What I'm saying is a container with a tap or spigot to dispense the drink, and when you make it, you open the top, add ingredients, throw in the dry ice, it carbonates, and the excess pressure is released safely.  then just open the valve and you get your home made fizzy drink with out the danger of co2 bombs.  It would probably jet out of the spigot at first because of the co2 pressure, but then develope a vacuum later on and not dispense the root beer very well.  In that case, you could remove the valve and allow air to come in and that would defeat the vacuum.




              --
              That which yields isn't always weak.
            • lordship@comcast.net
              Go to www.thehomebrewstore.com. You can get Rainbow brand soda extracts for around $5 to make a 4 gallon batch. --Madoc
              Message 6 of 18 , Aug 1, 2006
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                Go to www.thehomebrewstore.com. You can get Rainbow brand soda extracts for around $5 to make a 4 gallon batch. --Madoc

                At 07:32 AM 8/1/2006, you wrote:

                Id love any recipes I can get, Beer, Cider or anything else drinkable. Anybody know an easy/cheep way to do rootbeers? I know their not period, but the little ones want something to drink around the fire when the homebrew makes its rounds. I thought that RB might be nice, but to make a non-kit version, the sassafras extract was $20 for a small 3oz bottle.

                 

                From: sca_brew@yahoogroups.com [ mailto:sca_brew@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Daphnebd@...
                Sent: Friday, July 14, 2006 10:54 AM
                To: sca_brew@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: Re: [SCA_Brew] Apple Beer

                 

                This is one of the joys of cider making that I like to talk about, because I have learned/ am learning a lot about apples. :-)  I am still very much an amateur brewer!

                 Most soft apple ciders (including concentrates) are made with dessert apples; ones that are usually very sweet and juicey, but tend to be lower in tanins (bitter flavors) and malic acid (tartness).  The tanins and acids are what give an apple that nice apple flavor. Go to your local store and buy a bunch of different apples and taste test them. Using a combination of tart apples and sweet dessert apples is what you need to make a good hard cider.  You can still make a good cider using already pressed cider, you just have to be picky about what quality you use.  Don't use anything that has been additive pasteurized.  I also don't use any ciders that are clear.  And try to steer away from white sugar.  That stuff is processed so much it no longer resembles its original form.  Raw sugar or honey is what I use.

                During first stage fermentation, when the yeast is actively converting the sugar to alcohol (&other by products), you will lose a lot of the dessert apple flavor with the sweetness.  Sometimes during second stage fermentation, or even after being bottled, if the right bacteria is present, than malolactic fermentation can occur, in which the malic acid is converted into a more buttery tasting lactic acid.  The bacteria is natural; it is not something that can be controlled by sterilization.  There are ways to halt this, but I'm not real familiar with the use of sulfites, or heat pasteurization.  I plan on trying heat pasteurization for next War of the Lilies.  The dang heat there takes a beating on my ciders, even if they are kept on ice. 

                What I recommend is that if you want to make this batch more palatable, then you can rack it off the lees, add a couple more cans of concentrate to regain that apple taste, some priming sugar, bottle or keg it, and serve soon.  Its a cheaters way, but will result in a drinkable cider. 

                If you'd like some recipes or pointers on making cider, I'll be happy to share.

                Dafne

                 

                david.gillam@... writes:
              • lordship@comcast.net
                Mighta meant sarsaparilla... --Madoc
                Message 7 of 18 , Aug 1, 2006
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                  Mighta meant sarsaparilla... --Madoc

                  At 11:20 AM 8/1/2006, you wrote:

                  >and... where did you find sassafras extract? fda outlawed it a
                  >while back, as it contains a cancer causer. most root beer extracts
                  >today are wintergreen.
                • renblade20@aol.com
                  if anyone has some cider recipes that are good for beginners pleasse let me know id love to try something ... From: itsatrap@gmail.com To:
                  Message 8 of 18 , Aug 1, 2006
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                    if anyone has some cider recipes that are good for beginners pleasse let me know id love to try something 
                     
                     
                    -----Original Message-----
                    From: itsatrap@...
                    To: sca_brew@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Tue, 1 Aug 2006 10:19 AM
                    Subject: Re: [SCA_Brew] Apple Beer

                     
                    simplest way, you can get root beer artificial flavoring real cheap, toss it into water and sugar in the recommended amounts into one of those big orange spigot coolers, mix well, and toss about 5 pounds of dry ice in large chunks in.  leave the lid loosish, so that it does pressurize a bit, but can escape.  wait an hour.  its now cold and sparkling.

                     
                    On 8/1/06, David Gillam <david.gillam@ comcast.net> wrote:
                    Id love any recipes I can get, Beer, Cider or anything else drinkable. Anybody know an easy/cheep way to do rootbeers? I know their not period, but the little ones want something to drink around the fire when the homebrew makes its rounds. I thought that RB might be nice, but to make a non-kit version, the sassafras extract was $20 for a small 3oz bottle.
                     

                    From: sca_brew@yahoogroup s.com [mailto:sca_brew@yahoogroup s.com] On Behalf Of Daphnebd@aol. com
                    Sent: Friday, July 14, 2006 10:54 AM

                    To: sca_brew@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: Re: [SCA_Brew] Apple Beer
                     
                    This is one of the joys of cider making that I like to talk about, because I have learned/ am learning a lot about apples. :-)  I am still very much an amateur brewer! 
                     Most soft apple ciders (including concentrates) are made with dessert apples; ones that are usually very sweet and juicey, but tend to be lower in tanins (bitter flavors) and malic acid (tartness).  The tanins and acids are what give an apple that nice apple flavor. Go to your local store and buy a bunch of different apples and taste test them. Using a combination of tart apples and sweet dessert apples is what you need to make a good hard cider.  You can still make a good cider using already pressed cider, you just have to be picky about what quality you use.  Don't use anything that has been additive pasteurized.  I also don't use any ciders that are clear.  And try to steer away from white sugar.  That stuff is processed so much it no longer resembles its original form.  Raw sugar or honey is what I use.
                    During first stage fermentation, when the yeast is actively converting the sugar to alcohol (&other by products), you will lose a lot of the dessert apple flavor with the sweetness.  Sometimes during second stage fermentation, or even after being bottled, if the right bacteria is present, than malolactic fermentation can occur, in which the malic acid is converted into a more buttery tasting lactic acid.  The bacteria is natural; it is not something that can be controlled by sterilization.  There are ways to halt this, but I'm not real familiar with the use of sulfites, or heat pasteurization.  I plan on trying heat pasteurization for next War of the Lilies.  The dang heat there takes a beating on my ciders, even if they are kept on ice.  
                    What I recommend is that if you want to make this batch more palatable, then you can rack it off the lees, add a couple more cans of concentrate to regain that apple taste, some priming sugar, bottle or keg it, and serve soon.  Its a cheaters way, but will result in a drinkable cider. 
                    If you'd like some recipes or pointers on making cider, I'll be happy to share.
                    Dafne
                     
                    david.gillam@ comcast.net writes:



                    --
                    That which yields isn't always weak.

                    Check out AOL.com today. Breaking news, video search, pictures, email and IM. All on demand. Always Free.
                  • leaking pen
                    soft apple cider? heres my exs christmas punch. great stuff. crockpot full of apple juice. toss in two whole nutmegs, 10 -15 whole cloves, a few sticks of
                    Message 9 of 18 , Aug 1, 2006
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                      soft apple cider?  heres my exs christmas punch.  great stuff.  crockpot full of apple juice.  toss in two whole nutmegs, 10 -15 whole cloves, a few sticks of cinnamon.  turn on low.  let sit three days.  as you drink it, refill with fresh apple juice, after a day the flavor dies, strain out the parts and add new.  if you drain it dry, you have to start over, otherwise, as long as you dont take it more than halfway down before refilling it, its back up to full strength in an hour.  note, the strained herbs, dried again, and ground, make very interesting flavored varieties for cooking.  i use the clovey cinnamonay apply nutmeg in a lot of stuff.

                      On 8/1/06, renblade20@... <renblade20@...> wrote:

                      if anyone has some cider recipes that are good for beginners pleasse let me know id love to try something 
                       
                       
                      -----Original Message-----
                      From: itsatrap@...
                      To: sca_brew@yahoogroup s.com
                      Sent: Tue, 1 Aug 2006 10:19 AM
                      Subject: Re: [SCA_Brew] Apple Beer

                       
                      simplest way, you can get root beer artificial flavoring real cheap, toss it into water and sugar in the recommended amounts into one of those big orange spigot coolers, mix well, and toss about 5 pounds of dry ice in large chunks in.  leave the lid loosish, so that it does pressurize a bit, but can escape.  wait an hour.  its now cold and sparkling.

                       
                      On 8/1/06, David Gillam <david.gillam@...> wrote:
                      Id love any recipes I can get, Beer, Cider or anything else drinkable. Anybody know an easy/cheep way to do rootbeers? I know their not period, but the little ones want something to drink around the fire when the homebrew makes its rounds. I thought that RB might be nice, but to make a non-kit version, the sassafras extract was $20 for a small 3oz bottle.
                       

                      From: sca_brew@yahoogroup s.com [mailto:sca_brew@yahoogroup s.com] On Behalf Of Daphnebd@...
                      Sent: Friday, July 14, 2006 10:54 AM

                      To: sca_brew@yahoogroups.com
                      Subject: Re: [SCA_Brew] Apple Beer
                       
                      This is one of the joys of cider making that I like to talk about, because I have learned/ am learning a lot about apples. :-)  I am still very much an amateur brewer! 
                       Most soft apple ciders (including concentrates) are made with dessert apples; ones that are usually very sweet and juicey, but tend to be lower in tanins (bitter flavors) and malic acid (tartness).  The tanins and acids are what give an apple that nice apple flavor. Go to your local store and buy a bunch of different apples and taste test them. Using a combination of tart apples and sweet dessert apples is what you need to make a good hard cider.  You can still make a good cider using already pressed cider, you just have to be picky about what quality you use.  Don't use anything that has been additive pasteurized.  I also don't use any ciders that are clear.  And try to steer away from white sugar.  That stuff is processed so much it no longer resembles its original form.  Raw sugar or honey is what I use.
                      During first stage fermentation, when the yeast is actively converting the sugar to alcohol (&other by products), you will lose a lot of the dessert apple flavor with the sweetness.  Sometimes during second stage fermentation, or even after being bottled, if the right bacteria is present, than malolactic fermentation can occur, in which the malic acid is converted into a more buttery tasting lactic acid.  The bacteria is natural; it is not something that can be controlled by sterilization.  There are ways to halt this, but I'm not real familiar with the use of sulfites, or heat pasteurization.  I plan on trying heat pasteurization for next War of the Lilies.  The dang heat there takes a beating on my ciders, even if they are kept on ice.  
                      What I recommend is that if you want to make this batch more palatable, then you can rack it off the lees, add a couple more cans of concentrate to regain that apple taste, some priming sugar, bottle or keg it, and serve soon.  Its a cheaters way, but will result in a drinkable cider. 
                      If you'd like some recipes or pointers on making cider, I'll be happy to share.
                      Dafne
                       
                      david.gillam@ comcast.net writes:



                      --
                      That which yields isn't always weak.

                      Check out AOL.com today. Breaking news, video search, pictures, email and IM. All on demand. Always Free.
                       




                      --
                      That which yields isn't always weak.
                    • NINacide@aol.com
                      4 gallons of health food quality unfiltered apple juice (Henry s market) 3 pounds brown sugar 3 pounds honey a wine yeast that is in the 9-12% ABV pour 3
                      Message 10 of 18 , Aug 1, 2006
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                        4 gallons of health food quality unfiltered apple juice (Henry's market)
                        3 pounds brown sugar
                        3 pounds honey
                        a wine yeast that is in the 9-12% ABV
                         
                        pour 3 gallons of juice in the carboy
                        heat half a gallon (don't need to be precise, eyeball it) in the stock pot and dissolve the brown sugar.  add to carboy.
                        heat other half gallon  and dissolve honey.  add to carboy.
                         
                        make a starter.  aerate the must. add the starter. leave it alone for about a month.  add sparkoloid or other clarifier. rack it.  leave it alone for another month.  bottle it with a carbonation drop.  serve cold.
                      • David Gillam
                        Maybe it was sarsaparilla. Anyways, the recipe I had came from the late 1880s and called for one of the two, vanilla, wintergreen, and ginger. 2oz of each,
                        Message 11 of 18 , Aug 2, 2006
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                          Maybe it was sarsaparilla. Anyways, the recipe I had came from the late 1880s and called for one of the two, vanilla, wintergreen, and ginger. 2oz of each, boiled into an extract, then strained. Take the extract, add a gallon of water, a cup of sugar, ¼ TBS yeast, and let sit for 3 days. Then bottle and refrigerate. (If you don’t, it gets TASTY, but isn’t for the kiddies anymore.  ;p

                           


                          From: sca_brew@yahoogroups.com [mailto: sca_brew@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of leaking pen
                          Sent: Tuesday, August 01, 2006 11:21 AM
                          To: sca_brew@yahoogroups.com
                          Subject: Re: [SCA_Brew] Apple Beer

                           

                          and... where did you find sassafras extract?  fda outlawed it a while back, as it contains a cancer causer.  most root beer extracts today are wintergreen.

                          _,___

                        • David Gillam
                          Many thanks noble sirrah. _____ From: sca_brew@yahoogroups.com [mailto:sca_brew@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of lordship@comcast.net Sent: Tuesday, August 01,
                          Message 12 of 18 , Aug 2, 2006
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                            Many thanks noble sirrah.

                             


                            From: sca_brew@yahoogroups.com [mailto: sca_brew@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of lordship@...
                            Sent: Tuesday, August 01, 2006 5:46 PM
                            To: sca_brew@yahoogroups.com
                            Subject: RE: [SCA_Brew] Apple Beer

                             

                            Go to www.thehomebrewstor e.com. You can get Rainbow brand soda extracts for around $5 to make a 4 gallon batch. --Madoc

                            At 07:32 AM 8/1/2006, you wrote:

                            Id love any recipes I can get, Beer, Cider or anything else drinkable. Anybody know an easy/cheep way to do rootbeers? I know their not period, but the little ones want something to drink around the fire when the homebrew makes its rounds. I thought that RB might be nice, but to make a non-kit version, the sassafras extract was $20 for a small 3oz bottle.

                             


                            From: sca_brew@yahoogroup s.com [ mailto:sca_brew@ yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of Daphnebd@aol. com
                            Sent: Friday, July 14, 2006 10:54 AM
                            To: sca_brew@yahoogroup s.com
                            Subject: Re: [SCA_Brew] Apple Beer

                             

                            This is one of the joys of cider making that I like to talk about, because I have learned/ am learning a lot about apples. :-)  I am still very much an amateur brewer!

                             Most soft apple ciders (including concentrates) are made with dessert apples; ones that are usually very sweet and juicey, but tend to be lower in tanins (bitter flavors) and malic acid (tartness).  The tanins and acids are what give an apple that nice apple flavor. Go to your local store and buy a bunch of different apples and taste test them. Using a combination of tart apples and sweet dessert apples is what you need to make a good hard cider.  You can still make a good cider using already pressed cider, you just have to be picky about what quality you use.  Don't use anything that has been additive pasteurized.  I also don't use any ciders that are clear.  And try to steer away from white sugar.  That stuff is processed so much it no longer resembles its original form.  Raw sugar or honey is what I use.

                            During first stage fermentation, when the yeast is actively converting the sugar to alcohol (&other by products), you will lose a lot of the dessert apple flavor with the sweetness.  Sometimes during second stage fermentation, or even after being bottled, if the right bacteria is present, than malolactic fermentation can occur, in which the malic acid is converted into a more buttery tasting lactic acid.  The bacteria is natural; it is not something that can be controlled by sterilization.  There are ways to halt this, but I'm not real familiar with the use of sulfites, or heat pasteurization.  I plan on trying heat pasteurization for next War of the Lilies.  The dang heat there takes a beating on my ciders, even if they are kept on ice. 

                            What I recommend is that if you want to make this batch more palatable, then you can rack it off the lees, add a couple more cans of concentrate to regain that apple taste, some priming sugar, bottle or keg it, and serve soon.  Its a cheaters way, but will result in a drinkable cider. 

                            If you'd like some recipes or pointers on making cider, I'll be happy to share.

                            Dafne

                             

                            david.gillam@ comcast.net writes:

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