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Fresh herbs

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  • Bryce Eddings
    Hi, I brew beer and make the occasional mead, about one 5-gallon batch of mead a year keeps me well supplied, I don t suck it down like I do beer and wine. I
    Message 1 of 5 , Nov 10, 2003
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      Hi,
      I brew beer and make the occasional mead, about one 5-gallon batch of
      mead a year keeps me well supplied, I don't suck it down like I do
      beer and wine.
      I also keep an herb garden with lots of oregano, basil, cilantro,
      lemon balm, lavender and what ever else grabs my fancy. (The damn
      thing gets bigger and more crowded every year. I'm certain that in 5
      years it will have taken over the yard! I just can't stop myself.)
      I cook with them all the time but, save a couple of disasters, I
      don't mix my herbs and brewing. Here's why:
      About two years ago I thought that a simple Bitter would be
      interesting if I dry hopped with a few handfuls of Sweet Basil. I
      didn't do anything to sanitize the herb, mostly because I couldn't
      think of anything and, of course, the beer went bad. It had a mouth
      puckering sourness to it. I poured it out, the first time I ever had
      to do that. I scrubbed my carboy down and thought that was the end
      of it. It wasn't. I brewed three more beers in the next couple of
      months and every one of them had this same contamination. I could
      only get rid of it after I threw out all plastic or rubber that I had
      been using and scrubbed down all of my glass and work area. I
      haven't had the contamination again until about a year later I took a
      bright beer, divided it in 5 gallon jugs and put a different herb in
      each one. I put these in my fridge for 3 months and kept them at
      below 50 degrees. Each one spoiled with exactly the same
      contaminent. I threw out everything again. So, I decided to give up
      on herbs, at least for the time.
      So, to my reason for this post. I'm starting to think about trying
      again. Does anyone here have any advice? I don't want to put the
      herbs in during the boil, this would kill the fresh, floral qualities
      that I want to capture. I've thought about putting them in just
      after the boil and holding the wort at above 160 degrees for about 20
      minutes but that, too, may kill the fresh herb quality and, if it
      doesn't, it may spoil another beer.
      Any thoughts?
    • Nicholas Malone
      My first instinct would be to make a liquor (alcohol extract) with the herbs and add this near the finish or at bottling.
      Message 2 of 5 , Nov 10, 2003
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        My first instinct would be to make a liquor (alcohol extract) with the herbs and add this near the finish or at bottling.

        Bryce Eddings wrote:
        Hi,
        I brew beer and make the occasional mead, about one 5-gallon batch of
        mead a year keeps me well supplied, I don't suck it down like I do
        beer and wine.
        I also keep an herb garden with lots of oregano, basil, cilantro,
        lemon balm, lavender and what ever else grabs my fancy.  (The damn
        thing gets bigger and more crowded every year.  I'm certain that in 5
        years it will have taken over the yard!  I just can't stop myself.) 
        I cook with them all the time but, save a couple of disasters, I
        don't mix my herbs and brewing.  Here's why:
        About two years ago I thought that a simple Bitter would be
        interesting if I dry hopped with a few handfuls of Sweet Basil.  I
        didn't do anything to sanitize the herb, mostly because I couldn't
        think of anything and, of course, the beer went bad.  It had a mouth
        puckering sourness to it.  I poured it out, the first time I ever had
        to do that.  I scrubbed my carboy down and thought that was the end
        of it.  It wasn't.  I brewed three more beers in the next couple of
        months and every one of them had this same contamination.  I could
        only get rid of it after I threw out all plastic or rubber that I had
        been using and scrubbed down all of my glass and work area.  I
        haven't had the contamination again until about a year later I took a
        bright beer, divided it in 5 gallon jugs and put a different herb in
        each one.  I put these in my fridge for 3 months and kept them at
        below 50 degrees.  Each one spoiled with exactly the same
        contaminent.  I threw out everything again.  So, I decided to give up
        on herbs, at least for the time.
        So, to my reason for this post.  I'm starting to think about trying
        again.  Does anyone here have any advice?  I don't want to put the
        herbs in during the boil, this would kill the fresh, floral qualities
        that I want to capture.  I've thought about putting them in just
        after the boil and holding the wort at above 160 degrees for about 20
        minutes but that, too, may kill the fresh herb quality and, if it
        doesn't, it may spoil another beer.
        Any thoughts?




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      • Bryce Eddings
        Thanks, Nicholas. I d thought of that, sort of a fortified beer. But would this screw up the natural carbination in the bottles? I need to maintain a healthy
        Message 3 of 5 , Nov 10, 2003
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          Thanks, Nicholas. I'd thought of that, sort of a fortified beer.
          But would this screw up the natural carbination in the bottles? I
          need to maintain a healthy environment for the yeast or I'd end up
          with a couple of cases of flat beer. I guess if I did the math and
          kept the abv below 15% it should be OK. Good thought!

          --- In sca_brew@yahoogroups.com, Nicholas Malone <nix@i...> wrote:
          > My first instinct would be to make a liquor (alcohol extract) with
          the
          > herbs and add this near the finish or at bottling.
          >
          > Bryce Eddings wrote:
          >
          > > Hi,
          > > I brew beer and make the occasional mead, about one 5-gallon
          batch of
          > > mead a year keeps me well supplied, I don't suck it down like I do
          > > beer and wine.
          > > I also keep an herb garden with lots of oregano, basil, cilantro,
          > > lemon balm, lavender and what ever else grabs my fancy. (The damn
          > > thing gets bigger and more crowded every year. I'm certain that
          in 5
          > > years it will have taken over the yard! I just can't stop
          myself.)
          > > I cook with them all the time but, save a couple of disasters, I
          > > don't mix my herbs and brewing. Here's why:
          > > About two years ago I thought that a simple Bitter would be
          > > interesting if I dry hopped with a few handfuls of Sweet Basil. I
          > > didn't do anything to sanitize the herb, mostly because I couldn't
          > > think of anything and, of course, the beer went bad. It had a
          mouth
          > > puckering sourness to it. I poured it out, the first time I ever
          had
          > > to do that. I scrubbed my carboy down and thought that was the
          end
          > > of it. It wasn't. I brewed three more beers in the next couple
          of
          > > months and every one of them had this same contamination. I could
          > > only get rid of it after I threw out all plastic or rubber that I
          had
          > > been using and scrubbed down all of my glass and work area. I
          > > haven't had the contamination again until about a year later I
          took a
          > > bright beer, divided it in 5 gallon jugs and put a different herb
          in
          > > each one. I put these in my fridge for 3 months and kept them at
          > > below 50 degrees. Each one spoiled with exactly the same
          > > contaminent. I threw out everything again. So, I decided to
          give up
          > > on herbs, at least for the time.
          > > So, to my reason for this post. I'm starting to think about
          trying
          > > again. Does anyone here have any advice? I don't want to put the
          > > herbs in during the boil, this would kill the fresh, floral
          qualities
          > > that I want to capture. I've thought about putting them in just
          > > after the boil and holding the wort at above 160 degrees for
          about 20
          > > minutes but that, too, may kill the fresh herb quality and, if it
          > > doesn't, it may spoil another beer.
          > > Any thoughts?
          > >
          > >
          > >
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        • Thalia
          I have always added herds in the boil for the last 5 minutes. that way they are sterilized. Maybe you can dry them then add them. or even boil them in water
          Message 4 of 5 , Nov 10, 2003
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            I have always added herds in the boil for the last 5 minutes. that way they are sterilized.
            Maybe you can dry them then add them.   or even boil them in water and them add to the secondary fermentation.
            Lady Thalia

            Bryce Eddings <breddings@...> wrote:
            Hi,
            I brew beer and make the occasional mead, about one 5-gallon batch of
            mead a year keeps me well supplied, I don't suck it down like I do
            beer and wine.
            I also keep an herb garden with lots of oregano, basil, cilantro,
            lemon balm, lavender and what ever else grabs my fancy.  (The damn
            thing gets bigger and more crowded every year.  I'm certain that in 5
            years it will have taken over the yard!  I just can't stop myself.) 
            I cook with them all the time but, save a couple of disasters, I
            don't mix my herbs and brewing.  Here's why:
            About two years ago I thought that a simple Bitter would be
            interesting if I dry hopped with a few handfuls of Sweet Basil.  I
            didn't do anything to sanitize the herb, mostly because I couldn't
            think of anything and, of course, the beer went bad.  It had a mouth
            puckering sourness to it.  I poured it out, the first time I ever had
            to do that.  I scrubbed my carboy down and thought that was the end
            of it.  It wasn't.  I brewed three more beers in the next couple of
            months and every one of them had this same contamination.  I could
            only get rid of it after I threw out all plastic or rubber that I had
            been using and scrubbed down all of my glass and work area.  I
            haven't had the contamination again until about a year later I took a
            bright beer, divided it in 5 gallon jugs and put a different herb in
            each one.  I put these in my fridge for 3 months and kept them at
            below 50 degrees.  Each one spoiled with exactly the same
            contaminent.  I threw out everything again.  So, I decided to give up
            on herbs, at least for the time.
            So, to my reason for this post.  I'm starting to think about trying
            again.  Does anyone here have any advice?  I don't want to put the
            herbs in during the boil, this would kill the fresh, floral qualities
            that I want to capture.  I've thought about putting them in just
            after the boil and holding the wort at above 160 degrees for about 20
            minutes but that, too, may kill the fresh herb quality and, if it
            doesn't, it may spoil another beer.
            Any thoughts?




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          • Thalia
            That should work too. Nicholas Malone wrote: My first instinct would be to make a liquor (alcohol extract) with the herbs and add this near
            Message 5 of 5 , Nov 10, 2003
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              That should work too. 

              Nicholas Malone <nix@...> wrote:
              My first instinct would be to make a liquor (alcohol extract) with the herbs and add this near the finish or at bottling.

              Bryce Eddings wrote:
              Hi,
              I brew beer and make the occasional mead, about one 5-gallon batch of
              mead a year keeps me well supplied, I don't suck it down like I do
              beer and wine.
              I also keep an herb garden with lots of oregano, basil, cilantro,
              lemon balm, lavender and what ever else grabs my fancy.  (The damn
              thing gets bigger and more crowded every year.  I'm certain that in 5
              years it will have taken over the yard!  I just can't stop myself.) 
              I cook with them all the time but, save a couple of disasters, I
              don't mix my herbs and brewing.  Here's why:
              About two years ago I thought that a simple Bitter would be
              interesting if I dry hopped with a few handfuls of Sweet Basil.  I
              didn't do anything to sanitize the herb, mostly because I couldn't
              think of anything and, of course, the beer went bad.  It had a mouth
              puckering sourness to it.  I poured it out, the first time I ever had
              to do that.  I scrubbed my carboy down and thought that was the end
              of it.  It wasn't.  I brewed three more beers in the next couple of
              months and every one of them had this same contamination.  I could
              only get rid of it after I threw out all plastic or rubber that I had
              been using and scrubbed down all of my glass and work area.  I
              haven't had the contamination again until about a year later I took a
              bright beer, divided it in 5 gallon jugs and put a different herb in
              each one.  I put these in my fridge for 3 months and kept them at
              below 50 degrees.  Each one spoiled with exactly the same
              contaminent.  I threw out everything again.  So, I decided to give up
              on herbs, at least for the time.
              So, to my reason for this post.  I'm starting to think about trying
              again.  Does anyone here have any advice?  I don't want to put the
              herbs in during the boil, this would kill the fresh, floral qualities
              that I want to capture.  I've thought about putting them in just
              after the boil and holding the wort at above 160 degrees for about 20
              minutes but that, too, may kill the fresh herb quality and, if it
              doesn't, it may spoil another beer.
              Any thoughts?




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              [This E-mail scanned for viruses by Declude Virus]


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