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Re: [SCA-JML] Jinbaori

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  • Anthony J. Bryant
    ... Actually, that s the most problematic issue. In the older garments, fortunately the standard bolt width seems to be around 26-28 , but with some larger
    Message 1 of 25 , Jul 1, 2003
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      Rosemary Norwood wrote:

      >
      > This is what I'm in the middle of trying to do for Japanese kids garb -
      > figure out some kind of formula for what I do when I measure my toddler
      > up every 3 - 6 months. I know how to make a pattern from his
      > measurements in about 20 minutes, but I'm trying to make that mental
      > process make sense to other people. Project's on hold for now as I'm
      > just trying to churn out stuff for our first Pennsic but I'll come back
      > to it in the post-Pennsic season. If you want to brainstorm over it I'm
      > available via email or we'll be at Pennsic middle weekend and early 2nd
      > week. The basic pretext is I work out what his 'standard bolt width' is
      > and work from there.
      >

      Actually, that's the most problematic issue. In the older garments, fortunately the
      standard bolt width seems to be around 26-28", but with some larger folks, that's
      just barely going to make it. I still will be following the Japanese classification
      of garments (one-panel, two-panel, three-panel, etc.,) identifying how many "panel
      widths" of fabric are used. This comes into play in garments like kariginu and suikan
      (which have one-panel bodies) and ho and noshi (which have two panel bodies) and
      hakama (three-panel vs. four-panel types, etc.)

      The problem is that if you're rotund (like me) or very broad shouldered, "one panel
      wide" fabric wouldn't make a convincing body for a kariginu, but if you expand the
      width of the panel, you grossly will overmake the sleeves (which are 1.5 panels
      wide). So for "atypically shaped" folks, we may have to consider that the panel
      widths actually are a bit "elastic" -- wider for the body, normal for the rest of the
      garment. It sounds confusing, but if I can lay it out clearly, I hope I can get
      people to understand the disjoint between "proper historical measurement" by panels
      and "modern measurement" by flexi-panels.

      > Been muddling along in the dark with some help here and there
      > but so few people do Kamakura, let alone female Kamakura I get mostly
      > general and not specific help.

      Well you can always drop me a line. <G>


      Effingham
    • Rosemary Norwood
      ... Yes. That s exactally how I do it. I take his shoulder and waist measurements, look at the garment I m making and try to deduce how many panels each piece
      Message 2 of 25 , Jul 1, 2003
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        On Tue, Jul 01, 2003 at 01:30:43PM -0500, Anthony J. Bryant wrote:
        > Rosemary Norwood wrote:
        >
        > >
        > > This is what I'm in the middle of trying to do for Japanese kids garb -
        > > figure out some kind of formula for what I do when I measure my toddler
        > > up every 3 - 6 months. I know how to make a pattern from his
        > > measurements in about 20 minutes, but I'm trying to make that mental
        > > process make sense to other people. Project's on hold for now as I'm
        > > just trying to churn out stuff for our first Pennsic but I'll come back
        > > to it in the post-Pennsic season. If you want to brainstorm over it I'm
        > > available via email or we'll be at Pennsic middle weekend and early 2nd
        > > week. The basic pretext is I work out what his 'standard bolt width' is
        > > and work from there.
        > >
        >
        > Actually, that's the most problematic issue. In the older garments, fortunately the
        > standard bolt width seems to be around 26-28", but with some larger folks, that's
        > just barely going to make it. I still will be following the Japanese classification
        > of garments (one-panel, two-panel, three-panel, etc.,) identifying how many "panel
        > widths" of fabric are used. This comes into play in garments like kariginu and suikan
        > (which have one-panel bodies) and ho and noshi (which have two panel bodies) and
        > hakama (three-panel vs. four-panel types, etc.)
        >
        > The problem is that if you're rotund (like me) or very broad shouldered, "one panel
        > wide" fabric wouldn't make a convincing body for a kariginu, but if you expand the
        > width of the panel, you grossly will overmake the sleeves (which are 1.5 panels
        > wide). So for "atypically shaped" folks, we may have to consider that the panel
        > widths actually are a bit "elastic" -- wider for the body, normal for the rest of the
        > garment. It sounds confusing, but if I can lay it out clearly, I hope I can get
        > people to understand the disjoint between "proper historical measurement" by panels
        > and "modern measurement" by flexi-panels.
        >

        Yes. That's exactally how I do it. I take his shoulder and waist
        measurements, look at the garment I'm making and try to deduce how many
        panels each piece is constructed of and then work out what would be a
        panel width for him. So far I've worked with Hakama and Kosode based
        garments and this system works very easily.


        > > Been muddling along in the dark with some help here and
        there
        > > but so few people do Kamakura, let alone female Kamakura I get mostly
        > > general and not specific help.
        >
        > Well you can always drop me a line. <G>
        >
        >
        Don't open that can of worms unless you're willing to go there. ;)

        Tatsu
      • Park McKellop
        ... this sort of thing, but I really don t think anyone below the rank of baron or peer should be wearing jinbaori anyway... but that s just me. :) Effingham
        Message 3 of 25 , Apr 29, 2004
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          >Secondarily -- we don't really have sumptuary rules in the SCA that deal with
          this sort of thing, but I really don't think anyone below the rank of baron or
          peer should be wearing jinbaori anyway... but that's just me. :)


          Effingham

          That's not such a bad idea! ;-)

          Alcyoneus



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        • Otagiri Tatsuzou
          ... deal with ... of baron or ... Just remember, in these later days, when the low rise to the high, it s the guys in the jinbaori who will be first up against
          Message 4 of 25 , Apr 30, 2004
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            > >Secondarily -- we don't really have sumptuary rules in the SCA that
            deal with
            > this sort of thing, but I really don't think anyone below the rank
            of baron or
            > peer should be wearing jinbaori anyway... but that's just me. :)
            >
            >
            > Effingham
            >
            > That's not such a bad idea! ;-)
            >
            > Alcyoneus
            >
            >

            Just remember, in these later days, when the low rise to the high,
            it's the guys in the jinbaori who will be first up against the wall.

            Otagiri
          • coyote Silverpaw
            I have a pattern that I use email and I will explain it to you Its very simple and looks great on the field call me coyote, call me raven, call me something
            Message 5 of 25 , Jun 1, 2010
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              I have a pattern that I use
              email and I will explain it to you
              Its very simple and looks great on the field


              call me coyote, call me raven, call me something else
              youd be right, youd be wrong!
              Find something worth dying for, and LIVE for it!





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