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re: lexan shoji buildings

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  • Matt L
    Message 1 of 9 , Jun 30, 2003
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      Message: 1
      Date: Sat, 28 Jun 2003 15:19:54 -0700 (PDT)
      From: John Mooers <jemooers@...>
      Subject: lexan shoji buildings

      Greetings noble scholars,
      I am designing a portable modular Japanese house. If anyone has some
      practical experience or advice (and I've seen the marvel that Kuji-tono has
      built) in building such for Pennsic or other long term events, please let
      me know. My design concept is as follows. Start with a flatbed trailer with
      floor extensions attached by hinges so it folds up to form a box. 4x4 posts
      would fit into the flooring as supports. Inside would be stacked 3x6
      panels with lexan or some other translucent but weather resistant material
      substituting for paper in shoji "windows" and door panels. The edges of the
      platforms would have grooves set in the planking for the wall panels and
      similar boards set above the wall panels. One or two upright 4x4 posts
      would be set into the floor to help hold the roof up and walls together.
      PVC tubes would be assembled to form a roof structure covered with painted
      canvass to make up the roof. The roof Various sizes of trailers could be
      connected by walkways to make
      connected pavilions or large trailers used to make meeting areas or such.
      Over time several such could be built and stored at Cooper's Lake to help
      create a small temple complex or country living complex. I judge these to
      be more desireable than a collection of tents. Your thoughts and
      constructive criticism are most welcome.

      Date no Genshio Toshinobu


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      it just so happens that I am working on designing a simular thing for use
      by my lady and I, though my design is intended to be modular and so far has
      been designed to work as a single 8x12 room up to a large 64x88 complex
      with courtyard for a household 26-30 based on the old pennsic rulesof 1
      person for each 200sq ft. including main hall, kitchen, living quarters for
      around 30 people, a smallish tea room, a bath house, and three storage
      rooms for the encampments provisions, combat weapons, etc.

      my design calls for wooden frame, 4' sq floor pannels which bolt together,
      and modular interchangable pannels that can bemade sliding or fixed with a
      bolt/pin or two. I have not figured out what theroffing material would be
      yet, BUT the wall material is slated for plywood pannels or woodframed
      tyvek (a paper like substabce that is waterproof and tear proof)... the
      biggest problem with the tyvek is getting some that doesn't have big blue
      lettering on thee face of it. I know it is available without the righting,
      the question is would someone have to buy a huge roll of it toget it
      plain, or could smaller pieces be ordered... I have not yet found a source
      for unprinted tyvek, but it is used induustrialy and by some printers
      without the logos printed on it. the stuff I have found doesn't seem to be
      priced too baddly... (around half or less what the canvas would cot me) but
      I keep having these flashbacks to when I worked at a newspaper and the
      rolls ofpaper werecieved where so huge it tooka special forklift to move
      them.

      the beauty to the modular system is it can be made any numberof ways as
      long as you can provide it with the rafters and roofing material.

      unfortunatly I do not have much for documentation on building styles from
      the time period, and kindda find myself having to deal with japanese movies
      of the time period to deturmine what is what, and how things might have
      looked.

      on a brighter note... one of the members of my shire works with moldable
      polymers for a living... infact if any of you made it to border raids the
      site tokens where made using one of the polymers available through his
      company... he helped us set up a silicone mold to make several medalions at
      once, then they where cast using a 2 part polymer. He tells me the polymers
      available through the company he works for can do most anything uncluding
      possibly making a non-rubber equivilant of the rathbone axe heads that has
      the same basic properties, or make castings that look like bronze, or any
      other number of possibilities. I am thinking this stuff might make for
      great "rock wall" pannels. they would take a large mold or two, but then
      thin pannels could be made and painted.

      Matt L
      (sean macleod or yoshisomething)
      vulpine reach, meridies

      see aditional notes below.
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      Message: 2
      Date: Sat, 28 Jun 2003 14:59:15 -0800 (AKDT)
      From: Ii Saburou <logan@...>
      Subject: Re: lexan shoji buildings

      It sounds great. I've been thinking how great a similar situation would
      be. You might want to take a look at the Italian villa down by the Lake
      for ideas for a large, communal area.

      Several thoughts I have had--
      If you make the buildings right they could be modular and fit
      together to make larger buildings, but the roof might be a problem.
      You could do individual 'towers' like a castle complex (even do a
      gate if you are ambitious) and then put in walls that connect them and
      form the perimeter of your complex.
      You could do different pieces of a temple complex or
      shinden-zukuri style (in miniature, no doubt) architecture connected by
      walkways.
      Individual houses (like kuji's) set up next to one another could
      be a small village.

      Just my thoughts.

      -Ii

      The nice thing about using a modular system in whatever form you choose to
      take is that you can always create new complexes to suit the needs of
      yourself and your household even at a given event. you might only want a
      handfull of individual "huts" at a smaller event (like say border raids
      which I frequently use as an example lately because it just happened) to a
      large complex including specialty comunial rooms at larger events like
      gulfwars or pennsic.

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      Message: 6
      Date: Sat, 28 Jun 2003 19:55:05 -0400
      From: Solveig <nostrand@...>
      Subject: Re: lexan shoji buildings

      Date Dono!

      You appear to be suffering from the common misconception that shoji are
      external. What you need are amedo (sliding wooden shutters) on the outside
      which will keep the shoji snug and dry when it rains. The shoji themselves
      are simple wooden frames with washi applied. Children have been known to
      poke holes in shoji so that they can spy on people.
      --

      Your Humble Servant
      Solveig Throndardottir
      Amateur Scholar

      +----------------------------------------------------------------------+
      | Barbara Nostrand, Ph.D. | Solveig Throndardottir, CoM, CoS |
      | deMoivre Institute | Carolingia Statis Mentis Est |
      | mailto:nostrand@... | mailto:bnostran@... |
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      I am not trying to disagree here as I have huge respect for solveig, I was
      just wondering because I have seen many of the movies of clasical japan in
      which the lower class seem to use shoji like pannels on the exterior as
      well. I was of the impression that some of the classic japanese films where
      actualy put together with an eye to acuracy. (I refer to RAN, Seven
      samurai, etc)... it could just be that my memory is applying images to the
      wrong area too...

      also solveig expressed a concern about children poking holes in the walls
      to spy... I would like to point out that this is incredably difficult with
      tyvek... when I was a child I bought a book for a fw bucks on identifying
      animal tracks being the lover of outdoors I was/am... it had tyvek pages
      when tyvek was a new thing. they had a paragraph or so on the back cover if
      I remember correctly, but it said the booklet was waterproof, tear proof,
      etc. I did not belive them, so I proceded to try to tear apage out, and was
      unable to do so (not that I am stronger the wire binding is more willing to
      let go than the page. and as for it's waterproof ststus... many years did
      it see in the field being half burried in mud next to a track to identify
      the enimal that left said track. to date the only damage is a li'l of a
      stain from clay giving a pageortwo light brown slotches. I do not think
      children could poke holes in this without the use of a knife or something
      simular.
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      Message: 7
      Date: Sun, 29 Jun 2003 09:00:52 -0000
      From: "toshio" <jemooers@...>
      Subject: Re: lexan shoji buildings

      Lady Solveig,
      What my salt water addled brain was trying to convey was SHOIN
      style buildings, complete with fusuma or shoji interior partitions,
      optional rainshutters, and tatami floor covering suitable to my
      Muromachi Period reenactment interest. Solid outer walls with amedo
      covering shoji (again using modern plastics to replicate paper for
      durability and weatherproofing at Pennsic) would make up the bulk of
      the outer wall with sliding doors for access. Buildings, apart from
      castles, are my weakest area of research. I hope to remedy this with
      THIS project. One possible interpretation can be seen at:
      http://www.columbia.edu/itc/ealac/V3613/shoin/function.htm
      Toshinobu


      --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, Solveig <nostrand@a...> wrote:
      > Date Dono!
      >
      > You appear to be suffering from the common misconception that shoji
      are
      > external. What you need are amedo (sliding wooden shutters) on the
      outside
      > which will keep the shoji snug and dry when it rains. The shoji
      themselves
      > are simple wooden frames with washi applied. Children have been
      known to
      > poke holes in shoji so that they can spy on people.
      > --
      >
      > Your Humble Servant
      > Solveig Throndardottir
      > Amateur Scholar
      >
      > +-------------------------------------------------------------------
      ---+
      > | Barbara Nostrand, Ph.D. | Solveig Throndardottir, CoM,
      CoS |
      > | deMoivre Institute | Carolingia Statis Mentis
      Est |
      > | mailto:nostrand@a... | mailto:bnostran@l... |
      > +-------------------------------------------------------------------
      ---+
      > | Note. Many popular "free" email services are automatically routed
      to |
      > | the trash by my email
      filters. |
      > +-------------------------------------------------------------------
      ---+

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