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The perils of being Edward

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  • Solveig
    Barond Edward! Greetings from Solveig! ... That was a great suggestion. When I was at WSU, there was a night custodian who either had or was working on an MA
    Message 1 of 8 , Jun 28, 2003
      Barond Edward!

      Greetings from Solveig!

      >Teach in Japan? Taiwan? China? My younger brother quit teaching to
      >become a janitor. It paid better. 6 years of school wasted.

      That was a great suggestion. When I was at WSU, there was a night
      custodian who either had or was working on an MA in history and was
      also working on becoming a novelist. He was a great guy. As a
      university custodian, you get all those university perquisites.

      The high school teaching was a pretty good suggestion as well.
      A couple of years ago (probably when I was at Bradley University
      in Peoria, Illinois) a professor quit to go teach high school.
      He said that he would be getting more money, less agrivation, and
      better students by teaching high school.

      I do recommend that you go to Pennsic. It will be a bit of an ego
      boost for you at a time that you need it. As for going to Pennsic
      without a job. I've been there and done that. I got a job offer
      while at Pennsic and packed right after getting back to Toronto.
      I suggest starting to put your stuff into boxes now. However, you
      should also plan on looking for non-acadmic work in your current
      area.
      --

      Your Humble Servant
      Solveig Throndardottir
      Amateur Scholar

      +----------------------------------------------------------------------+
      | Barbara Nostrand, Ph.D. | Solveig Throndardottir, CoM, CoS |
      | deMoivre Institute | Carolingia Statis Mentis Est |
      | mailto:nostrand@... | mailto:bnostran@... |
      +----------------------------------------------------------------------+
      | Note. Many popular "free" email services are automatically routed to |
      | the trash by my email filters. |
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    • Anthony J. Bryant
      ... True, but I really do want to work with people with more developed minds. (That s not a slam on high schoolers, just a statement of fact -- you can teach
      Message 2 of 8 , Jun 29, 2003
        Solveig wrote:

        >
        > The high school teaching was a pretty good suggestion as well.
        > A couple of years ago (probably when I was at Bradley University
        > in Peoria, Illinois) a professor quit to go teach high school.
        > He said that he would be getting more money, less agrivation, and
        > better students by teaching high school.
        >

        True, but I really do want to work with people with more developed minds.
        (That's not a slam on high schoolers, just a statement of fact -- you can teach
        the average grad student at a level beyond which you can teach the average
        undergrad, and ditto the average undergrad and high-schooler. You, of course,
        know that, being in the ed biz; but I want to be sure that other folks reading
        this do, too.)

        >
        > I do recommend that you go to Pennsic. It will be a bit of an ego
        > boost for you at a time that you need it. As for going to Pennsic
        > without a job. I've been there and done that. I got a job offer
        > while at Pennsic and packed right after getting back to Toronto.
        > I suggest starting to put your stuff into boxes now. However, you
        > should also plan on looking for non-acadmic work in your current
        > area.

        Good idea, on both counts.

        Lord knows that there are enough books I have that I don't read *all the frikkin
        time* <G> that could happily live in boxes for months or more without affecting
        my quality of life. BUT NOT MY DICTIONARIES! Nooooo! No boxing-up for the happy
        word books! <G>

        Gads. I think I'm cracking up.

        Edward
      • Anthony J. Bryant
        ... That s exactly the problem. I have a one-bedroom apartment here that s larger than *anything* I ever had in Tokyo, and in some places my books are two deep
        Message 3 of 8 , Jun 29, 2003
          Solveig wrote:

          > Baron Edward!
          >
          > >Well, for a secure spot I wouldn't mind moving back to Japan. But,
          > >damn, I just have
          > >SOOOO many books...
          >
          > Getting them there isn't the problem. You simply get in touch with one of
          > those freight brokers and you pay by the cubic metre. The real problem is
          > finding an apartment in japan with enough space to unpack all of them.

          That's exactly the problem. I have a one-bedroom apartment here that's larger
          than *anything* I ever had in Tokyo, and in some places my books are two deep
          and even in piles.

          When I moved back from Japan, I was very happy to find that the shippers paid by
          volume rather than mass. Lots of boxes is one thing; lots of boxes of BOOKS
          weigh a ton.

          >
          > Even that isn't too hard if you live in the inaka and take up living in
          > a farm house.

          Actually, that would be kinda cool. <G>

          Effingham
        • Solveig
          Baron Edward! Greetings from Solveig! The problem with universal higher education is that it is universal. This means that a lot of college professors are
          Message 4 of 8 , Jun 29, 2003
            Baron Edward!

            Greetings from Solveig! The problem with universal "higher education" is
            that it is universal. This means that a lot of college professors are
            spending the bulk of their time trying to teach or rather pretending to
            teach people who would have been happier back in 1920 when they could
            have quite school at grade eight and gone to work in the mill somewhere.

            Let's see. What are you counting as dictionaries? Lots of book titles in
            Japan end with the kanji for dictionary. Are you counting all of those, or
            just the ones that really are dictionaries? I have at least more or less
            nine dictionaries involving Japan rattling around this office not counting
            the electronic ones. But if I start counting things with "jiten" in their
            title then the count really starts going up. I then start tossing in
            "saijiki" well, you know what that can lead to.

            As for books. I weigh mine on truck scales. I have several tons of the things.
            People walk into my office and wrinkle their noses at my books and make snide
            remarks to the effect of "do you read all those books". I don't have the guts
            to tell them that all they are seeing are my traveling books and books I've
            been reveiwing for textbook adoption. I don't even have all my sources for
            my pamphlet dug out of storage.
            --

            Your Humble Servant
            Solveig Throndardottir
            Amateur Scholar

            +----------------------------------------------------------------------+
            | Barbara Nostrand, Ph.D. | Solveig Throndardottir, CoM, CoS |
            | deMoivre Institute | Carolingia Statis Mentis Est |
            | mailto:nostrand@... | mailto:bnostran@... |
            +----------------------------------------------------------------------+
            | Note. Many popular "free" email services are automatically routed to |
            | the trash by my email filters. |
            +----------------------------------------------------------------------+
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