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[SCA-JML] Re: Kyoto no Tabi

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  • Barbara Nostrand
    Noble Cousin! ... Bad boy! No omochi! Japanese addresses are posted all over the place. There is a HUGE craft store near (as I recall) Kamata for those of you
    Message 1 of 74 , Mar 17, 2000
      Noble Cousin!

      >> Actually, I was a bad boy and skipped out without finding the exact
      >> address. It was next to Nijo Castle, and it was just a small hole in
      >> the wall, from the looks of it. I wish, looking back, that I had paid
      >> more attention, but my main thought was that I didn't have enough money,
      >> and then some other people walked in; and the people were pretty busy.

      Bad boy! No omochi! Japanese addresses are posted all over the place.

      There is a HUGE craft store near (as I recall) Kamata for those of
      you in the Kanto.

      >> Why is everything thing nijou, sanjou, shijou, gojou, etc. in Kyoto? Was
      >> that street or district names? It seems to be relative to the Imperial
      >> Palace, does anyone know? I looked up 'Jou' and it said it was 'line,
      >> standard, limit' in the dictionary.

      Street names established back in the days when Heiankyou was brand new.

      >Some branches of the Fujiwara family took their name from the location of
      >their
      >estates; the Ichijo, Sanjo, and Kujo.

      Just to complicate things, there appear to be lots of people with no
      real relationship to the Fujiwara's that have -to names, I believe
      that the same thing apoplies to -jo names. (I should look it up.)

      >They were definitely in common use by the Sengoku Period, but I can't recall
      >when they first came into use. I'll have to look it up. You're right that
      >they were used by both men and women.

      There is an early kyougen called "Suehirogari" which is a play on words
      for "fan" and "umberella".

      I suspect that the folding umberellas show up in the Muromachi period.
      For that matter, folding fans should show up in the Muromachi period
      as well.

      Your Humble Servant
      Solveig Throndardottir
      Amateur Scholar

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    • Joshua Badgley
      ... From the castle I headed south (right from the castle entrance, and it was at the northeast corner of the next block down, if I am remembering correctly.
      Message 74 of 74 , Mar 17, 2000
        On Fri, 17 Mar 2000, Anthony J. Bryant wrote:

        > > Actually, I was a bad boy and skipped out without finding the exact
        > > address. It was next to Nijo Castle, and it was just a small hole in
        > > the wall, from the looks of it. I wish, looking back, that I had paid
        > > more attention, but my main thought was that I didn't have enough money,
        > > and then some other people walked in; and the people were pretty busy.
        > >
        >
        > Hmmm... Okay, as you stand in front of the entrance to Nijo, is it to the left or
        > right? Same street, or down a side street?

        From the castle I headed south (right from the castle entrance, and it was
        at the northeast corner of the next block down, if I am remembering
        correctly. (In other words, head south, cross the street, and you're
        there.)

        It caught my eye because of the tsuba and various other furniture in the
        window. I thought it might have something I could afford. On entering,
        however...

        Well, the entire 'shop' seems to be just a selling point. It is one room,
        enough space for maybe 5 people, comfortably. Blades are mounted on the
        walls. I'm pretty sure they do more than shinken, and I sure hope it was
        real shinken with the price tags I saw.

        They also had one ancient looking tsuba for about \11,000 or more, that I
        saw. I wish I could help more. Now I really feel bad for not being more
        attentive.

        > True. I'd like to go in and look at the place in person, though... <g>

        Nod.

        And thanks for the rest of the info.


        -Godric Logan
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