Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: [SCA-JML] Things to do at Japanese themed event?

Expand Messages
  • ELAINE KOOGLER
    We ve done a couple of Japanese/Oriental themed events, and have done some things that might be fun for both children and adults: 1. Silk dyeing: Tie dyeing
    Message 1 of 10 , Jun 2, 2003
      We've done a couple of Japanese/Oriental themed events, and have done
      some things that might be fun for both children and adults:

      1. Silk dyeing: Tie dyeing (shibori) is period. So what we did was
      to do a modified kind of tie dyeing as I saw it done at the Textile
      Museum here in DC. You give each person (the adults were so interested
      that they almost took stuff away from the children!) a square of
      inexpensive silk (Ruppert, Gibbon & Spider are very helpful here...as
      would Dharma Trading). Have a collection of items (marbles, match
      sticks, binder clips, string, rubber bands, smooth, small rocks, etc)
      for folks to use to create various designs. The dye we used was Kool
      Aid...turns out that, as silk is an animal fiber, koolaid will dye it!
      So we made up buckets of koolaid in various colors, along with a couple
      of buckets of clear water for rinsing. We also provided drying racks
      for the silk to hang on to dry. Everyone had a wonderful time!

      2. Kite making/flying: We provide materials for folks to build/paint
      kites...again a very popular pastime. We also taught a short class on
      the subject.

      Hope these ideas help....

      Kiri



      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Amanita <rjb@...>
      Date: Monday, June 2, 2003 10:09 am
      Subject: [SCA-JML] Things to do at Japanese themed event?

      > <span><p><span><p>
      >
      >
      > <tt>
      > Last night I was coming up with some things for a Japanese event.
      >
      > Definately Sumo 101 and the following tournament. That would be
      > the
      >
      > one of the day's highlights. I was also thinking perhaps find
      > somebody
      >
      > who would be willing to teach classes on Sumi-e or calligraphy, as
      >
      > well as somebody from the local kendo club, although I wonder if
      > the
      >
      > marshalls would frown on that. And also, perhaps a tea ceremony
      > would
      >
      > be good. I know the really formal ones can take a couple of hours
      > to
      >
      > do, so perhaps a simpler ceremony that beginners could participate in.
      >
      >
      >
      > But then I got to thinking-what about the kids?
      >
      > At first I was thinking kid's Sumo, modified of course. But then I
      >
      > realised that perhaps even modified Sumo might be too dangerous
      > for
      >
      > the youngsters. It *is* grappling, after all. And small children
      > would
      >
      > get bored silly sitting through a tea ceremony or sumi-e class.
      > Not to
      >
      > mention the messy substances.
      >
      >
      >
      > So for starters, I came up with a couple of activities for the kids:
      >
      > Origami- This could be something for kids and grownups alike.
      > Maybe
      >
      > have a beginner class that kids could attend, with an advanced
      > class
      >
      > following, for anyone who wants some more.
      >
      >
      >
      > Boffer kendo tournament- I've got two foam swords with the
      > consistancy
      >
      > of thin pool noodles that would be perfect- they're even shaped
      > like
      >
      > shinai. It would just be a matter of finding or making a few more.
      >
      > The kids could have their "combat" without worry about
      > getting hurt,
      >
      > just having fun.
      >
      >
      >
      > Anyone else wish to add anything? Any more ideas for adult and
      > kid's
      >
      > activities/classes?
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > </tt>
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > <!-- |**|begin egp html banner|**| -->
      >
      > <table border=0 cellspacing=0 cellpadding=2>
      > <tr bgcolor=#FFFFCC>
      > <td align=center><font size="-1" color=#003399><b>Yahoo! Groups
      > Sponsor</b></font></td></tr>
      > <tr bgcolor=#FFFFFF>
      > <td align=center width=470><table border=0 cellpadding=0
      > cellspacing=0> <tr> <td align=center><font face=arial size=-
      > 2>ADVERTISEMENT</font><img
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      src="http://us.a1.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/a/qu/quinstreet/uofpoff_300_250_0
      001.gif" alt="" width="300" height="250"
      border="0"></td></tr></table></td></tr><tr><td><img alt="" width=1
      height=1 src="http://us.adserver.yahoo.com/l?
      M=245454.3115308.4434529.1261774/D=egroupmail/S=:HM/A=1457554/rand=78178
      6433"></td></tr></table><!-- |**|end egp html banner|**| -->
      >
      > <tt>
      > UNSUBSCRIBE: E-mail sca-jml-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com</tt>
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > <tt>Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
      > Service.</tt></br>
      >
      > </span></span>
      >
      >
    • ELAINE KOOGLER
      Oh, that reminds me...we also had a poetry competition. I found one called Zig Zag Waters in one of the books I have. Turns out that it s a 12th century
      Message 2 of 10 , Jun 2, 2003
        Oh, that reminds me...we also had a poetry competition. I found one
        called Zig Zag Waters in one of the books I have. Turns out that it's
        a 12th century competition (thought that was 'way cool!!). The
        participants would stand on either side of a stream. There would be a
        sake jug and cup placed in a small boat which would be floated across
        the stream from person to person. Each person would add a line to the
        poem that was being created...the person running the competition would
        supply the opening line...and take a drink of sake. Once finished,
        they would place the jug and cup back in the boat and float it across
        the stream to the next person.

        We've never been fortunately enough to have a stream running through
        our site, but we've done the same idea, simply having folks pass the
        sake back and forthe between two lines.

        Works great...we have someone take down all of the lines, which we
        subsequently publish on our web site and our newsletter. The winner is
        the person who, in the opinion of the judges, adds the best line.

        Great fun!!!

        Kiri



        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "Choronzey, Marc" <mchoronz@...>
        Date: Monday, June 2, 2003 10:28 am
        Subject: RE: [SCA-JML] Things to do at Japanese themed event?

        > <span><p><span><p>
        >
        >
        > <tt>
        > Konnichiwa all,
        >
        >
        >
        > We hold a small (less than 50 people) japanese themed event every
        > other year
        >
        > in Vieux Bourg (Qc, Qc) and we've had haiku competitions, a little
        > kabuki
        > show, kyudo demo, sake workshop, a class on etiquette and on japanese
        >
        > warfare....that I can remember. We are planning to hold another
        > one soon
        >
        > enough and we are also thinking on new activities to run....
        > Origami is
        >
        > good, a basic chado temae (tea ceremony), a sumi-e competition,
        > and I plan
        >
        > on running a very basic taiko workshop... if my drum is finished
        > by that
        >
        > time, of course.... an arts & sciences competition is always
        > apprepriate and
        >
        > I agree with the boffer kendo class for young ones. Personally, I
        > think that
        >
        > without going in the gory details, sumi-e can indeed be fun for
        > kids....
        > just explain to them that it's instinctive line painting, put up a
        > large-ish
        >
        > sheet of paper, black watercolour paint and let'em rip! :)
        >
        >
        >
        > Well, gambatte kudasai! (good luck)
        >
        >
        >
        > -Hozo-ji no hebikagebo Shisen.
        >
        >
        >
        > -Marc Choronzey
        >
        > Support SAC, BMC Montreal
        >
        > work : 514.420.7888 poste 3221
        >
        > Page : 514.414.0907
        >
        > Cell : 514.917.4764
        >
        >
        >
        > > -----Message d'origine-----
        >
        > > De: Amanita
        >
        > > Date: Monday, June 02, 2003 10:09 AM
        >
        > > À: sca-jml@yahoogroups.com
        >
        > > Objet: [SCA-JML] Things to do at Japanese themed event?
        >
        > >
        >
        > > Last night I was coming up with some things for a Japanese event.
        >
        > > Definately Sumo 101 and the following tournament. That would
        > be the
        >
        > > one of the day's highlights. I was also thinking perhaps find
        > somebody
        >
        > > who would be willing to teach classes on Sumi-e or
        > calligraphy, as
        >
        > > well as somebody from the local kendo club, although I wonder
        > if the
        >
        > > marshalls would frown on that. And also, perhaps a tea
        > ceremony would
        >
        > > be good. I know the really formal ones can take a couple of
        > hours to
        >
        > > do, so perhaps a simpler ceremony that beginners could
        > participate in.
        >
        > >
        >
        > > But then I got to thinking-what about the kids?
        >
        > > At first I was thinking kid's Sumo, modified of course. But
        > then I
        >
        > > realised that perhaps even modified Sumo might be too
        > dangerous for
        >
        > > the youngsters. It *is* grappling, after all. And small
        > children would
        >
        > > get bored silly sitting through a tea ceremony or sumi-e
        > class. Not to
        >
        > > mention the messy substances.
        >
        > >
        >
        > > So for starters, I came up with a couple of activities for
        > the kids:
        >
        > > Origami- This could be something for kids and grownups alike.
        > Maybe
        >
        > > have a beginner class that kids could attend, with an
        > advanced class
        >
        > > following, for anyone who wants some more.
        >
        > >
        >
        > > Boffer kendo tournament- I've got two foam swords with the
        > consistancy
        >
        > > of thin pool noodles that would be perfect- they're even
        > shaped like
        >
        > > shinai. It would just be a matter of finding or making a few
        > more.
        > > The kids could have their "combat" without worry
        > about getting hurt,
        >
        > > just having fun.
        >
        > >
        >
        > > Anyone else wish to add anything? Any more ideas for adult
        > and kid's
        >
        > > activities/classes?
        >
        > >
        >
        > >
        >
        > >
        >
        > >
        >
        > > UNSUBSCRIBE: E-mail sca-jml-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
        >
        > >
        >
        > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
        > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
        >
        > >
        >
        > </tt>
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > <!-- |**|begin egp html banner|**| -->
        >
        > <table border=0 cellspacing=0 cellpadding=2>
        > <tr bgcolor=#FFFFCC>
        > <td align=center><font size="-1" color=#003399><b>Yahoo! Groups
        > Sponsor</b></font></td></tr>
        > <tr bgcolor=#FFFFFF>
        > <td align=center width=470><table border=0 cellpadding=0
        > cellspacing=0><tr><td align=center>
        > <img
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > src="http://ads.x10.com/?Z3lhaG9vaG0xLmRhd=1054564246%
        3eM=247865.3355058.4641699.1261774/D=egroupweb/S=1705767503:HM/A=1482387
        /R=3" alt="" width="300" height="250"
        border="0"></td></tr></table></td></tr><tr><td><img alt="" width=1
        height=1 src="http://us.adserver.yahoo.com/l?
        M=247865.3355058.4641699.1261774/D=egroupmail/S=:HM/A=1482387/rand=40541
        3697"></td></tr></table><!-- |**|end egp html banner|**| -->
        >
        > <tt>
        > UNSUBSCRIBE: E-mail sca-jml-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com</tt>
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > <tt>Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
        > Service.</tt></br>
        >
        > </span></span>
        >
        >
      • Choronzey, Marc
        They do that in the novel Taiko as well.... it does sound like great fun. :) -Shisen. -Marc Choronzey Support SAC, BMC Montreal work : 514.420.7888 poste 3221
        Message 3 of 10 , Jun 2, 2003
          They do that in the novel Taiko as well.... it does sound like great fun. :)

          -Shisen.

          -Marc Choronzey
          Support SAC, BMC Montreal
          work : 514.420.7888 poste 3221
          Page : 514.414.0907
          Cell : 514.917.4764

          > -----Message d'origine-----
          > De: ELAINE KOOGLER
          > Date: Monday, June 02, 2003 12:20 PM
          > À: sca-jml@yahoogroups.com
          > Objet: Re: RE: [SCA-JML] Things to do at Japanese themed event?
          >
          > Oh, that reminds me...we also had a poetry competition. I found one
          > called Zig Zag Waters in one of the books I have. Turns out that it's
          > a 12th century competition (thought that was 'way cool!!). The
          > participants would stand on either side of a stream. There would be a
          > sake jug and cup placed in a small boat which would be floated across
          > the stream from person to person. Each person would add a line to the
          > poem that was being created...the person running the competition would
          > supply the opening line...and take a drink of sake. Once finished,
          > they would place the jug and cup back in the boat and float it across
          > the stream to the next person.
          >
          > We've never been fortunately enough to have a stream running through
          > our site, but we've done the same idea, simply having folks pass the
          > sake back and forthe between two lines.
          >
          > Works great...we have someone take down all of the lines, which we
          > subsequently publish on our web site and our newsletter. The winner is
          > the person who, in the opinion of the judges, adds the best line.
          >
          > Great fun!!!
          >
          > Kiri
          >
          >
          >
          > ----- Original Message -----
          > From: "Choronzey, Marc" <mchoronz@...>
          > Date: Monday, June 2, 2003 10:28 am
          > Subject: RE: [SCA-JML] Things to do at Japanese themed event?
          >
          > > <span><p><span><p>
          > >
          > >
          > > <tt>
          > > Konnichiwa all,
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > We hold a small (less than 50 people) japanese themed event every
          > > other year
          > >
          > > in Vieux Bourg (Qc, Qc) and we've had haiku competitions, a little
          > > kabuki
          > > show, kyudo demo, sake workshop, a class on etiquette and on japanese
          > >
          > > warfare....that I can remember. We are planning to hold another
          > > one soon
          > >
          > > enough and we are also thinking on new activities to run....
          > > Origami is
          > >
          > > good, a basic chado temae (tea ceremony), a sumi-e competition,
          > > and I plan
          > >
          > > on running a very basic taiko workshop... if my drum is finished
          > > by that
          > >
          > > time, of course.... an arts & sciences competition is always
          > > apprepriate and
          > >
          > > I agree with the boffer kendo class for young ones. Personally, I
          > > think that
          > >
          > > without going in the gory details, sumi-e can indeed be fun for
          > > kids....
          > > just explain to them that it's instinctive line painting, put up a
          > > large-ish
          > >
          > > sheet of paper, black watercolour paint and let'em rip! :)
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > Well, gambatte kudasai! (good luck)
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > -Hozo-ji no hebikagebo Shisen.
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > -Marc Choronzey
          > >
          > > Support SAC, BMC Montreal
          > >
          > > work : 514.420.7888 poste 3221
          > >
          > > Page : 514.414.0907
          > >
          > > Cell : 514.917.4764
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > > -----Message d'origine-----
          > >
          > > > De: Amanita
          > >
          > > > Date: Monday, June 02, 2003 10:09 AM
          > >
          > > > À: sca-jml@yahoogroups.com
          > >
          > > > Objet: [SCA-JML] Things to do at Japanese themed event?
          > >
          > > >
          > >
          > > > Last night I was coming up with some things for a Japanese event.
          > >
          > > > Definately Sumo 101 and the following tournament. That would
          > > be the
          > >
          > > > one of the day's highlights. I was also thinking perhaps find
          > > somebody
          > >
          > > > who would be willing to teach classes on Sumi-e or
          > > calligraphy, as
          > >
          > > > well as somebody from the local kendo club, although I wonder
          > > if the
          > >
          > > > marshalls would frown on that. And also, perhaps a tea
          > > ceremony would
          > >
          > > > be good. I know the really formal ones can take a couple of
          > > hours to
          > >
          > > > do, so perhaps a simpler ceremony that beginners could
          > > participate in.
          > >
          > > >
          > >
          > > > But then I got to thinking-what about the kids?
          > >
          > > > At first I was thinking kid's Sumo, modified of course. But
          > > then I
          > >
          > > > realised that perhaps even modified Sumo might be too
          > > dangerous for
          > >
          > > > the youngsters. It *is* grappling, after all. And small
          > > children would
          > >
          > > > get bored silly sitting through a tea ceremony or sumi-e
          > > class. Not to
          > >
          > > > mention the messy substances.
          > >
          > > >
          > >
          > > > So for starters, I came up with a couple of activities for
          > > the kids:
          > >
          > > > Origami- This could be something for kids and grownups alike.
          > > Maybe
          > >
          > > > have a beginner class that kids could attend, with an
          > > advanced class
          > >
          > > > following, for anyone who wants some more.
          > >
          > > >
          > >
          > > > Boffer kendo tournament- I've got two foam swords with the
          > > consistancy
          > >
          > > > of thin pool noodles that would be perfect- they're even
          > > shaped like
          > >
          > > > shinai. It would just be a matter of finding or making a few
          > > more.
          > > > The kids could have their "combat" without worry
          > > about getting hurt,
          > >
          > > > just having fun.
          > >
          > > >
          > >
          > > > Anyone else wish to add anything? Any more ideas for adult
          > > and kid's
          > >
          > > > activities/classes?
          > >
          > > >
          > >
          > > >
          > >
          > > >
          > >
          > > >
          > >
          > > > UNSUBSCRIBE: E-mail sca-jml-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
          > >
          > > >
          > >
          > > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
          > > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
          > >
          > > >
          > >
          > > </tt>
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > <!-- |**|begin egp html banner|**| -->
          > >
          > > <table border=0 cellspacing=0 cellpadding=2>
          > > <tr bgcolor=#FFFFCC>
          > > <td align=center><font size="-1" color=#003399><b>Yahoo! Groups
          > > Sponsor</b></font></td></tr>
          > > <tr bgcolor=#FFFFFF>
          > > <td align=center width=470><table border=0 cellpadding=0
          > > cellspacing=0><tr><td align=center>
          > > <img
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > src="http://ads.x10.com/?Z3lhaG9vaG0xLmRhd=1054564246%
          > 3eM=247865.3355058.4641699.1261774/D=egroupweb/S=1705767503:HM/A=1482387
          > /R=3" alt="" width="300" height="250"
          > border="0"></td></tr></table></td></tr><tr><td><img alt="" width=1
          > height=1 src="http://us.adserver.yahoo.com/l?
          > M=247865.3355058.4641699.1261774/D=egroupmail/S=:HM/A=1482387/rand=40541
          > 3697"></td></tr></table><!-- |**|end egp html banner|**| -->
          > >
          > > <tt>
          > > UNSUBSCRIBE: E-mail sca-jml-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com</tt>
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > <tt>Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
          > > Service.</tt></br>
          > >
          > > </span></span>
          > >
          > >
          >
          >
          >
          > UNSUBSCRIBE: E-mail sca-jml-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
          >
          > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
          >
        • lord_aharon_of_talkon
          I ve run three japanese tourney s and 1 asian themed event, so here is a short list for you! There is a book called How things Work: Japan I believe, which
          Message 4 of 10 , Jun 2, 2003
            I've run three japanese tourney's and 1 asian themed event, so here
            is a short list for you!

            There is a book called "How things Work: Japan" I believe, which is
            for kids. It's a GREAT book (I can't seem to find my copy
            anywhere...ARG!) that shows how to make kites, carp flyers, sushi,
            musical instruments, period hats, No masks, haiku, paper
            screens...just everything under the sun! I strongly recommend
            springing the $10 for it. There is also a newer japanese book, which
            again, I can't find (I just reorganized my books too...wah!) that I
            believe its called something like Seasonal Crafts from Japan, and
            that goes season by season with the festivals, with crafty things to
            make.

            Other things we've done:

            Make a Zen Garden with your surroundings (like a scavenger hunt of
            sorts).
            Make small zen gardens (bring shoe boxes, sand little rocks and you
            got it!)
            Potato woodblock prints (making stamps from potato or you can use
            poured plaster or turnips, or carrots, or lineolium)
            Make temari balls (sorry for the poor spelling)
            Chopstick Dexerity Contests (pick up alphabet soup noodles and spell
            words, pick up lentils, bee-bees, etc)
            Kumihimo Classes (there is a great book on how to available on
            Amazon. Here in Caid there are a number of people who teach classes
            on it)
            Rice Sclputure (this is a lot of fun but it gets SUPER messy...the
            rice has to be sticky and you bring extra veggies for color
            variations, etc)
            Fan Painting
            Haiku contests (and you could give the winners to your local
            newsletter if you get approvals from the writers...chroniclers
            appreciate this stuff usually)
            Paper Mache masks
            Noh Plays (one group did Beauty & the Beast, only like a japanese
            play)

            I know this may sound a little bad, but the moment we started
            allowing rapier into the tourney, we got more people showing up. Our
            marshall had a number of very fun scenarios that revolved around
            fighting in tea houses, against ninja, in bath houses (one the rapier
            people had to hold a towel around their waist as they fought), and
            just tons of other things. I think opening up an event to the rapier
            crowd is a good idea, especially here when Japanese stuff isn't as
            popular as it used to be.

            Also, 20 years ago, Altavia had a camping japanese event where they
            set up this scavanger hunt for the fighters. A quest of sorts, where
            they had to battle against different warriors and evil spirits. Its
            a VERY LONG scenario which took the gentleman 30 minutes to properly
            explain it to me, so I apologize for not sharing. Basically, if you
            can set up "quests" and maybe do a map (which he had) it would be
            very fun...and doing one for kids would be a hoot too. Lots of work
            tho.

            The past events we also had our Iron Chef competition. Those were a
            lot of fun and pretty decent fundraiser.

            Check out the pictures on our web: http://www.sca-
            caid.org/altavia/photos/index.html

            Good luck!

            --Mercy (still in name transition)
          • sean ibanez
            If I recall correctly, this is now called tanka no rengai. It used to be more formal and was waka no rengai. Inthese forms the various writers would take
            Message 5 of 10 , Jun 6, 2003
              If I recall correctly, this is now called tanka no rengai. It used to be more formal and was waka no rengai. Inthese forms the various writers would take turns writing various stanzas in 575 77 format--the first writer would write 575, the next the 77, and on, though there may have been a different arrangement. That's all I remember reading however.
              Irobe Saburo Yoriie

              "Choronzey, Marc" <mchoronz@...> wrote:
              They do that in the novel Taiko as well.... it does sound like great fun. :)

              -Shisen.

              -Marc Choronzey
              Support SAC, BMC Montreal
              work : 514.420.7888 poste 3221
              Page : 514.414.0907
              Cell : 514.917.4764

              > -----Message d'origine-----
              > De: ELAINE KOOGLER
              > Date: Monday, June 02, 2003 12:20 PM
              > �: sca-jml@yahoogroups.com
              > Objet: Re: RE: [SCA-JML] Things to do at Japanese themed event?
              >
              > Oh, that reminds me...we also had a poetry competition. I found one
              > called Zig Zag Waters in one of the books I have. Turns out that it's
              > a 12th century competition (thought that was 'way cool!!). The
              > participants would stand on either side of a stream. There would be a
              > sake jug and cup placed in a small boat which would be floated across
              > the stream from person to person. Each person would add a line to the
              > poem that was being created...the person running the competition would
              > supply the opening line...and take a drink of sake. Once finished,
              > they would place the jug and cup back in the boat and float it across
              > the stream to the next person.
              >
              > We've never been fortunately enough to have a stream running through
              > our site, but we've done the same idea, simply having folks pass the
              > sake back and forthe between two lines.
              >
              > Works great...we have someone take down all of the lines, which we
              > subsequently publish on our web site and our newsletter. The winner is
              > the person who, in the opinion of the judges, adds the best line.
              >
              > Great fun!!!
              >
              > Kiri
              >
              >
              >
              > ----- Original Message -----
              > From: "Choronzey, Marc" <mchoronz@...>
              > Date: Monday, June 2, 2003 10:28 am
              > Subject: RE: [SCA-JML] Things to do at Japanese themed event?
              >
              > > <span><p><span><p>
              > >
              > >
              > > <tt>
              > > Konnichiwa all,
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > We hold a small (less than 50 people) japanese themed event every
              > > other year
              > >
              > > in Vieux Bourg (Qc, Qc) and we've had haiku competitions, a little
              > > kabuki
              > > show, kyudo demo, sake workshop, a class on etiquette and on japanese
              > >
              > > warfare....that I can remember. We are planning to hold another
              > > one soon
              > >
              > > enough and we are also thinking on new activities to run....
              > > Origami is
              > >
              > > good, a basic chado temae (tea ceremony), a sumi-e competition,
              > > and I plan
              > >
              > > on running a very basic taiko workshop... if my drum is finished
              > > by that
              > >
              > > time, of course.... an arts & sciences competition is always
              > > apprepriate and
              > >
              > > I agree with the boffer kendo class for young ones. Personally, I
              > > think that
              > >
              > > without going in the gory details, sumi-e can indeed be fun for
              > > kids....
              > > just explain to them that it's instinctive line painting, put up a
              > > large-ish
              > >
              > > sheet of paper, black watercolour paint and let'em rip! :)
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > Well, gambatte kudasai! (good luck)
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > -Hozo-ji no hebikagebo Shisen.
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > -Marc Choronzey
              > >
              > > Support SAC, BMC Montreal
              > >
              > > work : 514.420.7888 poste 3221
              > >
              > > Page : 514.414.0907
              > >
              > > Cell : 514.917.4764
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > > -----Message d'origine-----
              > >
              > > > De: Amanita
              > >
              > > > Date: Monday, June 02, 2003 10:09 AM
              > >
              > > > �: sca-jml@yahoogroups.com
              > >
              > > > Objet: [SCA-JML] Things to do at Japanese themed event?
              > >
              > > >
              > >
              > > > Last night I was coming up with some things for a Japanese event.
              > >
              > > > Definately Sumo 101 and the following tournament. That would
              > > be the
              > >
              > > > one of the day's highlights. I was also thinking perhaps find
              > > somebody
              > >
              > > > who would be willing to teach classes on Sumi-e or
              > > calligraphy, as
              > >
              > > > well as somebody from the local kendo club, although I wonder
              > > if the
              > >
              > > > marshalls would frown on that. And also, perhaps a tea
              > > ceremony would
              > >
              > > > be good. I know the really formal ones can take a couple of
              > > hours to
              > >
              > > > do, so perhaps a simpler ceremony that beginners could
              > > participate in.
              > >
              > > >
              > >
              > > > But then I got to thinking-what about the kids?
              > >
              > > > At first I was thinking kid's Sumo, modified of course. But
              > > then I
              > >
              > > > realised that perhaps even modified Sumo might be too
              > > dangerous for
              > >
              > > > the youngsters. It *is* grappling, after all. And small
              > > children would
              > >
              > > > get bored silly sitting through a tea ceremony or sumi-e
              > > class. Not to
              > >
              > > > mention the messy substances.
              > >
              > > >
              > >
              > > > So for starters, I came up with a couple of activities for
              > > the kids:
              > >
              > > > Origami- This could be something for kids and grownups alike.
              > > Maybe
              > >
              > > > have a beginner class that kids could attend, with an
              > > advanced class
              > >
              > > > following, for anyone who wants some more.
              > >
              > > >
              > >
              > > > Boffer kendo tournament- I've got two foam swords with the
              > > consistancy
              > >
              > > > of thin pool noodles that would be perfect- they're even
              > > shaped like
              > >
              > > > shinai. It would just be a matter of finding or making a few
              > > more.
              > > > The kids could have their "combat" without worry
              > > about getting hurt,
              > >
              > > > just having fun.
              > >
              > > >
              > >
              > > > Anyone else wish to add anything? Any more ideas for adult
              > > and kid's
              > >
              > > > activities/classes?
              > >
              > > >
              > >
              > > >
              > >
              > > >
              > >
              > > >
              > >
              > > > UNSUBSCRIBE: E-mail sca-jml-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
              > >
              > > >
              > >
              > > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
              > > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
              > >
              > > >
              > >
              > > </tt>
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > <!-- |**|begin egp html banner|**| -->
              > >
              > > <table border=0 cellspacing=0 cellpadding=2>
              > > <tr bgcolor=#FFFFCC>
              > > <td align=center><font size="-1" color=#003399><b>Yahoo! Groups
              > > Sponsor</b></font></td></tr>
              > > <tr bgcolor=#FFFFFF>
              > > <td align=center width=470><table border=0 cellpadding=0
              > > cellspacing=0><tr><td align=center>
              > > <img
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > src="http://ads.x10.com/?Z3lhaG9vaG0xLmRhd=1054564246%
              > 3eM=247865.3355058.4641699.1261774/D=egroupweb/S=1705767503:HM/A=1482387
              > /R=3" alt="" width="300" height="250"
              > border="0"></td></tr></table></td></tr><tr><td><img alt="" width=1
              > height=1 src="http://us.adserver.yahoo.com/l?
              > M=247865.3355058.4641699.1261774/D=egroupmail/S=:HM/A=1482387/rand=40541
              > 3697"></td></tr></table><!-- |**|end egp html banner|**| -->
              > >
              > > <tt>
              > > UNSUBSCRIBE: E-mail sca-jml-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com</tt>
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > <tt>Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
              > > Service.</tt></br>
              > >
              > > </span></span>
              > >
              > >
              >
              >
              >
              > UNSUBSCRIBE: E-mail sca-jml-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
              >
              > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
              >

              Yahoo! Groups Sponsor

              UNSUBSCRIBE: E-mail sca-jml-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

              Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.


              ---------------------------------
              Do you Yahoo!?
              Free online calendar with sync to Outlook(TM).

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Ii Saburou
              ... I seem to recall that you can sometimes start with the end of the poem (the 77) in some instances. I m not sure if this was for the game, or just as a
              Message 6 of 10 , Jun 6, 2003
                On Fri, 6 Jun 2003, sean ibanez wrote:

                > If I recall correctly, this is now called tanka no rengai. It used to
                > be more formal and was waka no rengai. Inthese forms the various
                > writers would take turns writing various stanzas in 575 77 format--the
                > first writer would write 575, the next the 77, and on, though there may
                > have been a different arrangement. That's all I remember reading
                > however. Irobe Saburo Yoriie

                I seem to recall that you can sometimes start with the end of the poem
                (the 77) in some instances. I'm not sure if this was for the game, or
                just as a general poetic 'challenge' of sorts, though.

                -Ii
              • sean ibanez
                That would indeed be a challenge. ... I seem to recall that you can sometimes start with the end of the poem (the 77) in some instances. I m not sure if this
                Message 7 of 10 , Jun 7, 2003
                  That would indeed be a challenge.

                  Ii Saburou <logan@...> wrote:On Fri, 6 Jun 2003, sean ibanez wrote:

                  > If I recall correctly, this is now called tanka no rengai. It used to
                  > be more formal and was waka no rengai. Inthese forms the various
                  > writers would take turns writing various stanzas in 575 77 format--the
                  > first writer would write 575, the next the 77, and on, though there may
                  > have been a different arrangement. That's all I remember reading
                  > however. Irobe Saburo Yoriie

                  I seem to recall that you can sometimes start with the end of the poem
                  (the 77) in some instances. I'm not sure if this was for the game, or
                  just as a general poetic 'challenge' of sorts, though.

                  -Ii


                  Yahoo! Groups Sponsor

                  UNSUBSCRIBE: E-mail sca-jml-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

                  Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.



                  ---------------------------------
                  Do you Yahoo!?
                  Free online calendar with sync to Outlook(TM).

                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Solveig
                  Noble Cousins! Greetings from Solveig! This sort of poetry party activity was pretty popular during the Muromachi period and if kyougen about them give any
                  Message 8 of 10 , Jun 8, 2003
                    Noble Cousins!

                    Greetings from Solveig! This sort of poetry party activity was pretty popular
                    during the Muromachi period and if kyougen about them give any idea, they
                    were not necessarily all that super serious.
                    --

                    Your Humble Servant
                    Solveig Throndardottir
                    Amateur Scholar

                    +----------------------------------------------------------------------+
                    | Barbara Nostrand, Ph.D. | Solveig Throndardottir, CoM, CoS |
                    | deMoivre Institute | Carolingia Statis Mentis Est |
                    | mailto:nostrand@... | mailto:bnostran@... |
                    +----------------------------------------------------------------------+
                    | Note. Many popular "free" email services are automatically routed to |
                    | the trash by my email filters. |
                    +----------------------------------------------------------------------+
                  Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.