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What to do at Japanese-themed events

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  • jennmoaks@msn.com
    Amanita, I had come across this site on making bunraku puppets some time ago and thought it would be a neat activity for kids. The kids could make the puppets
    Message 1 of 7 , Jun 2, 2003
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      Amanita,
      I had come across this site on making bunraku puppets some time ago and thought it would be a neat activity for kids. The kids could make the puppets and then put on a show for the adults, or just for themselves.


      http://members.lsa.net/mckeown/classroomprojects/japan/play1.html

      Keaiji
      (MKA Jenn Oaks)

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Solveig
      Noble Cousins! Greetings from Solveig! Alas! The problem with Bunraku and Chikamatsu in particular is that they are pretty much post-period. There are other
      Message 2 of 7 , Jun 3, 2003
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        Noble Cousins!

        Greetings from Solveig! Alas! The problem with Bunraku and Chikamatsu in
        particular is that they are pretty much post-period. There are other
        spiffy theatrical forms available such as Noh-Kyogen and avarious forms
        of street acrobatics and other stuff.

        There are a variety of Japanse games which can be played. There is
        actually quite a bit of genuine period Japanese stuff that can be done
        at an event.
        --

        Your Humble Servant
        Solveig Throndardottir
        Amateur Scholar

        +----------------------------------------------------------------------+
        | Barbara Nostrand, Ph.D. | Solveig Throndardottir, CoM, CoS |
        | deMoivre Institute | Carolingia Statis Mentis Est |
        | mailto:nostrand@... | mailto:bnostran@... |
        +----------------------------------------------------------------------+
        | Note. Many popular "free" email services are automatically routed to |
        | the trash by my email filters. |
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      • Marko Peussa
        Is the japanese badminton, hagoita, period? I happen to have a couple of paddles and a few hard black berries with feathers. And what about the rules? No net?
        Message 3 of 7 , Jun 9, 2003
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          Is the japanese badminton, hagoita, period? I happen to have a couple of
          paddles and a few hard black berries with feathers. And what about the
          rules? No net? The winning pair is the one that has most hits? Playing this
          game makes a lot of noise!

          I got this set from www.karankoron.com

          Regards,

          Klaus

          ----- Original Message -----
          From: "Solveig" <nostrand@...>
          To: <sca-jml@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Tuesday, June 03, 2003 12:21
          Subject: Re: [SCA-JML] What to do at Japanese-themed events


          > Noble Cousins!
          >
          > Greetings from Solveig! Alas! The problem with Bunraku and Chikamatsu in
          > particular is that they are pretty much post-period. There are other
          > spiffy theatrical forms available such as Noh-Kyogen and avarious forms
          > of street acrobatics and other stuff.
          >
          > There are a variety of Japanse games which can be played. There is
          > actually quite a bit of genuine period Japanese stuff that can be done
          > at an event.
          > --
          >
          > Your Humble Servant
          > Solveig Throndardottir
          > Amateur Scholar
          >
          > +----------------------------------------------------------------------+
          > | Barbara Nostrand, Ph.D. | Solveig Throndardottir, CoM, CoS |
          > | deMoivre Institute | Carolingia Statis Mentis Est |
          > | mailto:nostrand@... | mailto:bnostran@... |
          > +----------------------------------------------------------------------+
          > | Note. Many popular "free" email services are automatically routed to |
          > | the trash by my email filters. |
          > +----------------------------------------------------------------------+
          >
          >
          > UNSUBSCRIBE: E-mail sca-jml-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
          >
          > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
          >
          >
          >
        • Solveig
          Noble Cousins! Greetings from Solveig! A hago is a shuttlecock and a hagoita is a paddle for hitting the suttlecock. While I found hago listed in Daijirin, I
          Message 4 of 7 , Jun 9, 2003
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            Noble Cousins!

            Greetings from Solveig! A hago is a shuttlecock and a hagoita is a
            paddle for hitting the suttlecock. While I found hago listed in Daijirin,
            I could not find it listed in any of my three kogojiten which suggests
            that it is relatively new to Japan. Unfortunately, I could not find
            any of my saijiki. Since it is associated with New Year, it should
            appear in a saijiki which would index poems in which it appears.
            --

            Your Humble Servant
            Solveig Throndardottir
            Amateur Scholar

            +----------------------------------------------------------------------+
            | Barbara Nostrand, Ph.D. | Solveig Throndardottir, CoM, CoS |
            | deMoivre Institute | Carolingia Statis Mentis Est |
            | mailto:nostrand@... | mailto:bnostran@... |
            +----------------------------------------------------------------------+
            | Note. Many popular "free" email services are automatically routed to |
            | the trash by my email filters. |
            +----------------------------------------------------------------------+
          • Marko Peussa
            The game is also called hanetsuki or tsukubane. Klaus ... From: Solveig To: Sent: Monday, June 09, 2003 23:37
            Message 5 of 7 , Jun 10, 2003
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              The game is also called hanetsuki or tsukubane.

              Klaus

              ----- Original Message -----
              From: "Solveig" <nostrand@...>
              To: <sca-jml@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Monday, June 09, 2003 23:37
              Subject: Re: [SCA-JML] What to do at Japanese-themed events


              > Noble Cousins!
              >
              > Greetings from Solveig! A hago is a shuttlecock and a hagoita is a
              > paddle for hitting the suttlecock. While I found hago listed in Daijirin,
              > I could not find it listed in any of my three kogojiten which suggests
              > that it is relatively new to Japan. Unfortunately, I could not find
              > any of my saijiki. Since it is associated with New Year, it should
              > appear in a saijiki which would index poems in which it appears.
              > --
              >
              > Your Humble Servant
              > Solveig Throndardottir
              > Amateur Scholar
              >
              > +----------------------------------------------------------------------+
              > | Barbara Nostrand, Ph.D. | Solveig Throndardottir, CoM, CoS |
              > | deMoivre Institute | Carolingia Statis Mentis Est |
              > | mailto:nostrand@... | mailto:bnostran@... |
              > +----------------------------------------------------------------------+
              > | Note. Many popular "free" email services are automatically routed to |
              > | the trash by my email filters. |
              > +----------------------------------------------------------------------+
              >
              >
              > UNSUBSCRIBE: E-mail sca-jml-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
              >
              > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
              >
              >
              >
            • Solveig
              Noble Cousin! Greetings from Solveig! ... Those don t show up in Kodansha Kogojiten either. I still haven t run across my saijiki. -- Your Humble Servant
              Message 6 of 7 , Jun 10, 2003
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                Noble Cousin!

                Greetings from Solveig!

                >The game is also called hanetsuki or tsukubane.

                Those don't show up in Kodansha Kogojiten either. I still haven't run across my
                saijiki.
                --

                Your Humble Servant
                Solveig Throndardottir
                Amateur Scholar

                +----------------------------------------------------------------------+
                | Barbara Nostrand, Ph.D. | Solveig Throndardottir, CoM, CoS |
                | deMoivre Institute | Carolingia Statis Mentis Est |
                | mailto:nostrand@... | mailto:bnostran@... |
                +----------------------------------------------------------------------+
                | Note. Many popular "free" email services are automatically routed to |
                | the trash by my email filters. |
                +----------------------------------------------------------------------+
              • Solveig
                Noble Cousins! Greetings from Solveig! I forgot to look in Louis Frederic. Japan Encyclopedia. Belknap/Harvard 2002. An article about hagoita appears on page
                Message 7 of 7 , Jun 11, 2003
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                  Noble Cousins!

                  Greetings from Solveig! I forgot to look in Louis Frederic. Japan
                  Encyclopedia. Belknap/Harvard 2002.

                  An article about hagoita appears on page 275 which notes that the
                  game is called "hanetsuki" or "oibane" and appears to have originated
                  as a game for young women in the imperial court during the fifteenth
                  century. The object of the game is to keep the "hane" shuttlecock in the
                  air and the game is scored by the number of times the shuttlecock hits
                  the ground.
                  --

                  Your Humble Servant
                  Solveig Throndardottir
                  Amateur Scholar

                  +----------------------------------------------------------------------+
                  | Barbara Nostrand, Ph.D. | Solveig Throndardottir, CoM, CoS |
                  | deMoivre Institute | Carolingia Statis Mentis Est |
                  | mailto:nostrand@... | mailto:bnostran@... |
                  +----------------------------------------------------------------------+
                  | Note. Many popular "free" email services are automatically routed to |
                  | the trash by my email filters. |
                  +----------------------------------------------------------------------+
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