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kozane hineno jikoro

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  • raimarusan
    I am currently in the middle of making my kabuto. It is going to be a 3 plate style, with a hineno jikoro. I am going to make a metal skirt that conforms to
    Message 1 of 4 , May 2, 2003
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      I am currently in the middle of making my kabuto. It is going to be
      a 3 plate style, with a hineno jikoro. I am going to make a metal
      skirt that conforms to the shape of my head more, for safety. so i
      am left with the ability to make my shikoro entirely decorative, at
      least without having to worry about combat functionality much.
      so i was toying with the idea of making the shikoro from kozane. I
      think that it will look particularly awesome with the black laquer/
      kon lacing theme. my problem is this, on the only page i've found
      that is worth anything (uh yeah that would be effingham's) there is
      little information on doing this. so i would greatly appreciate any
      info anyone could give me on doing this, or patterns i should use,
      lacing width will probably be 1/4 inch as thats what i have access to
      at the moment. i also apreciate any ideas anyone is willing to
      share, comments on composition, questions as to my sanity or lack
      thereof. well, look foreward to hearing from you.

      raimaru

      p.s. thanks to everyone who responded to my armor questions before,
      lots of help :-) <<bows>>
    • toshio
      Raimaru-tono, Since you were looking to recreate inexpensive japanese armor, I d recommend going with a Sugake Odoshi lacing pattern rather than Kebiki
      Message 2 of 4 , May 3, 2003
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        Raimaru-tono,
        Since you were looking to recreate "inexpensive" japanese armor,
        I'd recommend going with a Sugake Odoshi lacing pattern rather than
        Kebiki Odoshi. Sugake lacing is better suited for solid lames rather
        than kozane. If you still plan to use hon-kozane for your shikoro,
        the technique is the same as if you were making do, sode, etc. The
        individual kozane need to be irregular though, wider at the bottom
        than the top to acheive the outward sweeping appearance you're
        looking for. Using the psuedo kozane technique is also very useful
        (and stronger) for shikoro lames. Shikoro maintenance is for me the
        most frequent repair of my bogu. Use Edward-sensei's lacing patterns
        for expansion of lacing to help you with getting the laces right.

        Toshinobu

        --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, "raimarusan" <raimaru@a...> wrote:
        > I am currently in the middle of making my kabuto. It is going to
        be a 3 plate style, with a hineno jikoro. I am going to make a metal
        > skirt that conforms to the shape of my head more, for safety. so i
        > am left with the ability to make my shikoro entirely decorative, at
        > least without having to worry about combat functionality much.
        > so i was toying with the idea of making the shikoro from kozane. I
        > think that it will look particularly awesome with the black laquer/
        > kon lacing theme. my problem is this, on the only page i've found
        > that is worth anything (uh yeah that would be effingham's) there is
        > little information on doing this. so i would greatly appreciate
        any info anyone could give me on doing this, or patterns i should
        use, lacing width will probably be 1/4 inch as thats what i have
        access to at the moment. i also apreciate any ideas anyone is
        willing to share, comments on composition, questions as to my sanity
        or lack thereof. well, look foreward to hearing from you.
        >
        > raimaru
        >
        > p.s. thanks to everyone who responded to my armor questions before,
        > lots of help :-) <<bows>>
      • Anthony J. Bryant
        ... It s possible, but fuller style (o-manju, ko-manju, etc.) shikoro look goofy with a hineno kabuto, and you can t make a hineno- or etchu-jikoro out of
        Message 3 of 4 , May 3, 2003
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          raimarusan wrote:

          > I am currently in the middle of making my kabuto. It is going to be
          > a 3 plate style, with a hineno jikoro. I am going to make a metal
          > skirt that conforms to the shape of my head more, for safety. so i
          > am left with the ability to make my shikoro entirely decorative, at
          > least without having to worry about combat functionality much.
          > so i was toying with the idea of making the shikoro from kozane.

          It's possible, but fuller style (o-manju, ko-manju, etc.) shikoro look goofy
          with a hineno kabuto, and you can't make a hineno- or etchu-jikoro out of
          kozane. They're too small, with lames that are less than 1" deep in places.
          You'd have no room for the shitagarami. That being said, they were often
          made to *look* like kozane using the kiritsuke-zane process.


          Effingham
          ---------
          show France how you feel: just say "non"
          http://www.cafeshops.com/justsaynon
        • raimarusan
          ... look goofy ... out of ... places. ... often ... this is sano looking bummed :-( but he will get over it and try the kiritsuke-zane process.
          Message 4 of 4 , May 3, 2003
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            > It's possible, but fuller style (o-manju, ko-manju, etc.) shikoro
            look goofy
            > with a hineno kabuto, and you can't make a hineno- or etchu-jikoro
            out of
            > kozane. They're too small, with lames that are less than 1" deep in
            places.
            > You'd have no room for the shitagarami. That being said, they were
            often
            > made to *look* like kozane using the kiritsuke-zane process.

            this is sano looking bummed :-(
            but he will get over it and try the kiritsuke-zane process.
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