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Re: Squire ceremony

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  • Yama Kaminari no Date Saburou Yukiie
    public...gomen - minorly dyslexic... Date
    Message 1 of 10 , Apr 1, 2003
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      public...gomen - minorly dyslexic...
      Date
    • Solveig
      Noble Cousin! Greetings from Solveig! It depends upon how you view the relationship. If you are simply contracting with him for instruction, then you can
      Message 2 of 10 , Apr 1, 2003
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        Noble Cousin!

        Greetings from Solveig! It depends upon how you view the relationship.
        If you are simply contracting with him for instruction, then you can
        simply be introduced by an intermediary, give your background in which
        you of course state that you are unskilled and unworthy, and ask him to
        teach you. You offer him a present which is money wrapped in paper and
        placed on some sort of tray. The knight gives you a present back. This
        is pretty standard acquiring a teacher ritual.

        If you are entering employment and the knights household, then the knight
        is obliged to clothe you. The knight should therefore give you a set of
        livery or sufficient cloth in the appropriate colors of the household
        for you to make livery for yourself. And, no, a red belt is not enough.
        If this scenario, you do not offer payment. However, you still exchange
        gifts twice a year.

        Finally, it is rude to directly discuss payment. The knight can of course
        be generous and grant you shiki rights stated in koku.

        The knight may invite you to a sake ceremony. Since the knight is the
        superior and you are entering the knights house, the knight must play
        the role of host not guest.
        --

        Your Humble Servant
        Solveig Throndardottir
        Amateur Scholar

        +----------------------------------------------------------------------+
        | Barbara Nostrand, Ph.D. | Solveig Throndardottir, CoM, CoS |
        | deMoivre Institute | Carolingia Statis Mentis Est |
        | mailto:nostrand@... | mailto:bnostran@... |
        +----------------------------------------------------------------------+
        | Note. Many popular "free" email services are automatically routed to |
        | the trash by my email filters. |
        +----------------------------------------------------------------------+
      • Zach Schneider
        The only bad thing about the given scenarios is that he is a viking. He does like to have sake and all, it s just I usually end up being the host, or at least
        Message 3 of 10 , Apr 1, 2003
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          The only bad thing about the given scenarios is that he is a viking. He does like to have sake and all, it's just I usually end up being the host, or at least the provider of the sake ;) If I am entering his employment/service and he gives me the cloth to make something that represents his household, what do I offer him?
          Yoshida Takezo Hidesada
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: Solveig
          To: sca-jml@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Tuesday, April 01, 2003 11:34 AM
          Subject: Re: [SCA-JML] Squire ceremony


          Noble Cousin!

          Greetings from Solveig! It depends upon how you view the relationship.
          If you are simply contracting with him for instruction, then you can
          simply be introduced by an intermediary, give your background in which
          you of course state that you are unskilled and unworthy, and ask him to
          teach you. You offer him a present which is money wrapped in paper and
          placed on some sort of tray. The knight gives you a present back. This
          is pretty standard acquiring a teacher ritual.

          If you are entering employment and the knights household, then the knight
          is obliged to clothe you. The knight should therefore give you a set of
          livery or sufficient cloth in the appropriate colors of the household
          for you to make livery for yourself. And, no, a red belt is not enough.
          If this scenario, you do not offer payment. However, you still exchange
          gifts twice a year.

          Finally, it is rude to directly discuss payment. The knight can of course
          be generous and grant you shiki rights stated in koku.

          The knight may invite you to a sake ceremony. Since the knight is the
          superior and you are entering the knights house, the knight must play
          the role of host not guest.
          --

          Your Humble Servant
          Solveig Throndardottir
          Amateur Scholar

          +----------------------------------------------------------------------+
          | Barbara Nostrand, Ph.D. | Solveig Throndardottir, CoM, CoS |
          | deMoivre Institute | Carolingia Statis Mentis Est |
          | mailto:nostrand@... | mailto:bnostran@... |
          +----------------------------------------------------------------------+
          | Note. Many popular "free" email services are automatically routed to |
          | the trash by my email filters. |
          +----------------------------------------------------------------------+

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        • Solveig
          Noble Cousin! Greetings from Solveig! He could serve you mead. As for an exchange present. You give him some token of your home town. The big time gift giving
          Message 4 of 10 , Apr 2, 2003
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            Noble Cousin!

            Greetings from Solveig! He could serve you mead. As for an exchange present.
            You give him some token of your home town. The big time gift giving is
            in mid-Summer and mid-Winter when the vassals can be expected to chip in
            for a gift. Think of it as taxes. Today, teachers are given sums of money.
            The amount of the gift is equal to a months tuition. So actual tuition is
            14 months per year. The teacher then gives to the students an article used
            in the art being studied. These exchanges are pretty much obligatory.
            --

            Your Humble Servant
            Solveig Throndardottir
            Amateur Scholar

            +----------------------------------------------------------------------+
            | Barbara Nostrand, Ph.D. | Solveig Throndardottir, CoM, CoS |
            | deMoivre Institute | Carolingia Statis Mentis Est |
            | mailto:nostrand@... | mailto:bnostran@... |
            +----------------------------------------------------------------------+
            | Note. Many popular "free" email services are automatically routed to |
            | the trash by my email filters. |
            +----------------------------------------------------------------------+
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