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Emon information

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  • Ii Saburou
    I thought I would share the results of my recents studies. I am in the middle of finding information on sekitai* and came across a bit on Emon in Nihon
    Message 1 of 4 , Feb 17, 2003
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      I thought I would share the results of my recents studies. I am in the
      middle of finding information on sekitai* and came across a bit on 'Emon'
      in "Nihon fukushokushi jiten" (Japanese Clothing History Dictionary)

      According to the dictionary, 'Emon' refers to methods of wearing sokutai.
      They seem to have arisen towards the end of the Fujiwara Period as rules
      became stricter in great part (according to this source) to Toba Tennou.
      The foundation of the Emon movement seems to have come from Minamoto
      Arini (? 'Aru' + 'Nin'? There wasn't any furigana and I've not seen
      'Nin' in names before that I can recall) who invented rules for wearing
      the sokutai and passed it on to the two houses of Ooi-no-mikado and
      Tokudaiji. Eventually the Takakura and Yamashina families became
      proponents, spawning the Takakura and Yamashina schools.

      The following are the differences between the two schools listed in this
      source:

      METHOD FOR WEARING:
      Takakura: The way of fastening of the tennou's GOSAKU's (no trans.
      available: 'GO' (Honorific) and 'SAKU'--no kanji translation found)
      displeasure (honorific + kanmuri--could be the Emp.'s kanmuri?): Fasten
      only the left hook.
      Yamashima: Fasten both hooks.

      T: When arranging sokutai, first arrange the front, then move to the back.
      Y: First arrange the back, then move to the front.

      T: Half of the stones of the sekitai [ie the bottom half] should be
      concealed by the pouch of the hô.
      Y: All of the stones should be concealed by the pouch of the hô.

      T: Pleat both sleeves so that they each form a small "rabbit's ear".
      Y: Pleat both sleeves so that they each form two small "rabbit's ears".

      T: The yanagui (the quiver for the arrows) should rise to the left.
      Y: The yanagui should rise to the right.

      METHOD OF MAKING THE GARMENTS:
      T: The ken'ei (the tail on the kanmuri) should be wound around 1.5 times.
      Y: The ken'ei should be wound around twice.

      T: The wood used to pinch the ken'ei should be black lacquered for
      auspicious occassions, and plain wood for inauspicious.
      Y: The order is reversed.

      T: The thread of the hô should be the same color as the fabric of the hô.
      Y: The thread of the hô should be the white for auspicious occassions
      (Kitsu no toki), and the same color as the fabric for inauspicious
      occassions (Kyô no toki) [maybe celebration and mourning would be better
      translations?]

      T: The white thread holding on the tonbo (the ball-head of the frog that
      holds the neck closed) should form an 'X'.
      Y: The thread should form a cross ('+').

      T: The center of the tonbo should protrude and the thread connecting the
      receiving clasp of the frog to the garment should be visible from outside.
      Y: The center of the tonbo should be caved in, and the thread connecting
      the receiving clasp of the frog to the garment should not be visible from
      outside.

      T: The ninamusubi of the uwabakama should be braided once.
      Y: The ninamusubi of the uwabakama should be braided three times.

      T: The stones of the sekitai should be affixed at three points:
      > > > > >
      Y: The stones of the sekitai should be affixed at four points:
      <> <> <> <> <>

      T: The hanpi should be a continuous hanpi.
      Y: The hanpi should be a divided hanpi.

      T: The number of arrows in the quiver should be:
      Hirayanagui: 15 arrows (1 each of 'Uchiya'(?) and 'Ochiya'(?))
      Tsuboyanagui: 7 arrows (1 each of 'Uchiya' and 'Ochiya')
      Y: Hirayanagui: 22 arrows (2 each of 'Uchiya' and 'Ochiya')
      Tsuboyanagui: 7 arrows (1 each of 'Uchiya' and 'Ochiya')

      T: For women, the floral design of the cyprus fans consist of pine, plum,
      and orange (blossoms?).
      Y: The floral design of the cyprus fans consist of pine and plum.

      Not sure if this is useful to anyone, but I found it fascinating. I would
      appreciate it if anyone out there can clear up some of the questions (such
      as 'Uchiya', 'Ochiya', and 'gosaku').


      -Ii

      *aka 'Ishi-no-obi'--the black belt with stones that is part of the formal
      sokutai (formal court clothes).
    • Anthony J. Bryant
      ... Fascinating stuff. God, I love this. ... Minamoto no Arihito. This is the same -hito that runs in the Imperial line. (Given that he was a Minamoto, it s
      Message 2 of 4 , Feb 19, 2003
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        Ii Saburou wrote:

        > I thought I would share the results of my recents studies. I am in the
        > middle of finding information on sekitai* and came across a bit on 'Emon'
        > in "Nihon fukushokushi jiten" (Japanese Clothing History Dictionary)
        >

        Fascinating stuff. God, I love this.

        >
        > According to the dictionary, 'Emon' refers to methods of wearing sokutai.
        > They seem to have arisen towards the end of the Fujiwara Period as rules
        > became stricter in great part (according to this source) to Toba Tennou.
        > The foundation of the Emon movement seems to have come from Minamoto
        > Arini (? 'Aru' + 'Nin'? There wasn't any furigana and I've not seen
        > 'Nin' in names before that I can recall)

        Minamoto no Arihito. This is the same "-hito" that runs in the Imperial line.
        (Given that he was a Minamoto, it's no surprise. <G>)

        >
        > Y: The thread of the h should be the white for auspicious occassions
        > (Kitsu no toki), and the same color as the fabric for inauspicious
        > occassions (Ky no toki) [maybe celebration and mourning would be better
        > translations?]
        >

        I'd say "auspicious" and "inauspicious." I assume that they're taking the
        kyuu no toki to also include taboo days and so forth.


        > T: The number of arrows in the quiver should be:
        > Hirayanagui: 15 arrows (1 each of 'Uchiya'(?) and 'Ochiya'(?))
        > Tsuboyanagui: 7 arrows (1 each of 'Uchiya' and 'Ochiya')
        > Y: Hirayanagui: 22 arrows (2 each of 'Uchiya' and 'Ochiya')
        > Tsuboyanagui: 7 arrows (1 each of 'Uchiya' and 'Ochiya')
        >

        Could you quote your original text here? I want to make sure I've got it
        right.@

        For example, mine has text to the effect, "...Yamashina ryuu wa kore wo
        keishou shite uchi futa-seki wo otoshiya toshite ori..." ("...following this,
        the Yamashino school makes two arrows [of their total of 22) as otoshiya.") I
        think your 2 "uchiya" may actually be "--- uchi futa-seki", "two arrows out
        of ---"

        My primary source has :

        Takakura-ryuu:
        Hirayanagui: 15 (of these, 1 is otoshiya)
        Tsuboyanagui: 7 (of these, 1 is otoshiya)
        Yamashina-ryuu:
        Hirayanagui: 22 (of these, 2 are otoshiya)
        Tsuboyanagui: 7 (of these, 1 is otoshiya)

        > Not sure if this is useful to anyone, but I found it fascinating. I would
        > appreciate it if anyone out there can clear up some of the questions (such
        > as 'Uchiya', 'Ochiya', and 'gosaku').

        I can't lay my hands on any "ochiya."

        Probably a misread.? "otoshiya" --> "uwaya/uwazashinoya" --> "arrows
        attached in a quiver. Uses kakimata" (Kakimata is the U-shaped arrowhead).

        "Uchiya" is also Uchine, an arrow for throwing. Apparently, anyway...

        Gosaku we've already dealt with.


        Effingham
      • Ii Saburou
        ... Yes, it was: Uchi, otoshiya ippon (of this, one is otoshiya) Uchi, otoshiya nihon (of this, two are otoshiya) That makes more sense. Do to the fact that
        Message 3 of 4 , Feb 19, 2003
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          On Wed, 19 Feb 2003, Anthony J. Bryant wrote:

          > Fascinating stuff. God, I love this.
          >
          > Could you quote your original text here? I want to make sure I've got it
          > right.@
          >
          > For example, mine has text to the effect, "...Yamashina ryuu wa kore wo
          > keishou shite uchi futa-seki wo otoshiya toshite ori..." ("...following this,
          > the Yamashino school makes two arrows [of their total of 22) as otoshiya.") I
          > think your 2 "uchiya" may actually be "--- uchi futa-seki", "two arrows out
          > of ---"

          Yes, it was:
          Uchi, otoshiya ippon (of this, one is otoshiya)
          Uchi, otoshiya nihon (of this, two are otoshiya)

          That makes more sense. Do to the fact that everything is written in very
          abbreviated speech, I was thinking that it was two types of ya--uchi and
          otoshi (like the 'yon, gonin' instead of 'yonin, gonin').

          > > Not sure if this is useful to anyone, but I found it fascinating. I would
          > > appreciate it if anyone out there can clear up some of the questions (such
          > > as 'Uchiya', 'Ochiya', and 'gosaku').
          >
          > I can't lay my hands on any "ochiya."
          >
          > Probably a misread.? "otoshiya" --> "uwaya/uwazashinoya" --> "arrows
          > attached in a quiver. Uses kakimata" (Kakimata is the U-shaped arrowhead).

          Yeah. I was thinking 'ochiru' instead of 'otoshiya' So, is it pronounced
          'uwaya', then, or is that just another name for it?

          > "Uchiya" is also Uchine, an arrow for throwing. Apparently, anyway...

          Hmmm... I doubt this is what it was. It used the 'nai' (inside) kanji,
          not the 'utsu' kanji.

          I should also point out that I was corrected by Hiraizumi-sensei on
          another issue as well: the 'gosaku' should read 'osaku', the full length
          quote being 'tennou no osaku no okanmuri' which is a type of court cap
          with the ken'ei--the round, loopy tail.

          I am adding these corrections to the website I catalogued the information
          on:

          http://modzer0.cs.uaf.edu/~logan/emon.html

          -Ii
        • Anthony J. Bryant
          ... B lieve me, that s an easy one to make. I do it alla damn time. Grrr. ... Just another name for it. When the Daijirin gave uwazashinoya as a definition
          Message 4 of 4 , Feb 19, 2003
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            Ii Saburou wrote:

            > On Wed, 19 Feb 2003, Anthony J. Bryant wrote:
            >
            > > Fascinating stuff. God, I love this.
            > >
            > > Could you quote your original text here? I want to make sure I've got it
            > > right.@
            > >
            > > For example, mine has text to the effect, "...Yamashina ryuu wa kore wo
            > > keishou shite uchi futa-seki wo otoshiya toshite ori..." ("...following this,
            > > the Yamashino school makes two arrows [of their total of 22) as otoshiya.") I
            > > think your 2 "uchiya" may actually be "--- uchi futa-seki", "two arrows out
            > > of ---"
            >
            > Yes, it was:
            > Uchi, otoshiya ippon (of this, one is otoshiya)
            > Uchi, otoshiya nihon (of this, two are otoshiya)
            >
            > That makes more sense. Do to the fact that everything is written in very
            > abbreviated speech, I was thinking that it was two types of ya--uchi and
            > otoshi (like the 'yon, gonin' instead of 'yonin, gonin').
            >

            B'lieve me, that's an easy one to make. I do it alla damn time. Grrr.

            >
            > > > Not sure if this is useful to anyone, but I found it fascinating. I would
            > > > appreciate it if anyone out there can clear up some of the questions (such
            > > > as 'Uchiya', 'Ochiya', and 'gosaku').
            > >
            > > I can't lay my hands on any "ochiya."
            > >
            > > Probably a misread.? "otoshiya" --> "uwaya/uwazashinoya" --> "arrows
            > > attached in a quiver. Uses kakimata" (Kakimata is the U-shaped arrowhead).
            >
            > Yeah. I was thinking 'ochiru' instead of 'otoshiya' So, is it pronounced
            > 'uwaya', then, or is that just another name for it?
            >

            Just another name for it. When the Daijirin gave "uwazashinoya" as a definition
            for "otoshiya" I had a moment of fear that the definition of "uwazashinoya" would
            be "otoshiya." <G> Fortunately, that was not the case.

            (BTW, another definition of "otoshiya" is "an arrow shot down from above." That
            one makes sense, doesn't it? <G>)

            >
            > > "Uchiya" is also Uchine, an arrow for throwing. Apparently, anyway...
            >
            > Hmmm... I doubt this is what it was. It used the 'nai' (inside) kanji,
            > not the 'utsu' kanji.
            >

            I didn't think so. This is the wrong period for uchiya. (Which, BTW, is sometimes
            written with the kanji "uchi = inside" (apparently merely for phonic value) but
            more commonly "uchi = strike". This would make a useful weapon for fighters who
            want to engage *and* do missile work while in the field -- one doesn't need a bow,
            just a good throwing arm.


            Effingham
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