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Re: [SCA-JML] what to do when making Uchikake?

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  • Ii Saburou
    Well, I think that the second option would definitely allow you to have more freedom and to come up with a nice design, and probably be cheaper financially.
    Message 1 of 5 , Oct 5, 2002
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      Well, I think that the second option would definitely allow you to have
      more freedom and to come up with a nice design, and probably be cheaper
      financially. However, it will definitely be more time consuming.
      Something else to tink of is to do something in-between--either a brocade
      that you further embroider (not sure how well that would work), or silk
      that you dye (or get dyed) into a pattern, and then embroider beyond that.

      Either way, I think it will look great.

      -Ii

      On Sat, 5 Oct 2002, skyscraperpriestess wrote:

      > I am eventually planning to make an Uchikake for myself, and was
      > wondering what the best course of action would be. I have two options
      > right now.
      > The first is this- my local fabric store is selling some lovely
      > chinese brocade- black, with dragons all over. I was thinking this
      > might look pretty close to real. I cannot find Japanese brocades here,
      > chinese is the closest I can get. Buying online is NOT an option for
      > me at this time, so I must do my best with what is available.
      >
      > This is the second option- buy straight black brocade or heavy satin,
      > and then proceed to embroider and applique the designs on myself. This
      > would be cheaper, actually, but more labour intensive. It also allows
      > me to have a few larger beasties all over the thing- I was thinking of
      > cranes and dragons, with some smaller floral motifs as well. Perhaps
      > two or three dragons around the hem, and a large crane design on the
      > upper back..not sure about the sleeves, would those have decoration on
      > both sides or just the backs?
      >
      > So what do you guys think would produce a better result?
      >
      >
      >
      >
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    • ELAINE KOOGLER
      To be honest, I d go with the latter...sounds like it would be absolutely lovely, and would be your very own design. Another note: depending on how the colors
      Message 2 of 5 , Oct 7, 2002
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        To be honest, I'd go with the latter...sounds like it would be
        absolutely lovely, and would be your very own design. Another note:
        depending on how the colors work in the piece you describe as having
        dragons on it, you could potentially do an embroidered sort of thing on
        that as well. I personally love doing applique, but my research tells
        me that it wasn't done very often...however I have found some
        references to the technique in period...in fact one reference cites
        some Haniwa figures as having a design on the garment that looks like
        applique!

        Kiri



        ----- Original Message -----
        From: skyscraperpriestess <rjb@...>
        Date: Saturday, October 5, 2002 11:56 am
        Subject: [SCA-JML] what to do when making Uchikake?

        > <span><p><span><p>
        >
        >
        > <tt>
        > I am eventually planning to make an Uchikake for myself, and was
        >
        > wondering what the best course of action would be. I have two
        > options
        >
        > right now.
        >
        > The first is this- my local fabric store is selling some lovely
        >
        > chinese brocade- black, with dragons all over. I was thinking this
        >
        > might look pretty close to real. I cannot find Japanese brocades
        > here,
        >
        > chinese is the closest I can get. Buying online is NOT an option
        > for
        >
        > me at this time, so I must do my best with what is available.
        >
        >
        >
        > This is the second option- buy straight black brocade or heavy
        > satin,
        >
        > and then proceed to embroider and applique the designs on myself.
        > This
        >
        > would be cheaper, actually, but more labour intensive. It also
        > allows
        >
        > me to have a few larger beasties all over the thing- I was
        > thinking of
        >
        > cranes and dragons, with some smaller floral motifs as well.
        > Perhaps
        >
        > two or three dragons around the hem, and a large crane design on
        > the
        >
        > upper back..not sure about the sleeves, would those have
        > decoration on
        >
        > both sides or just the backs?
        >
        >
        >
        > So what do you guys think would produce a better result?
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > </tt>
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > <tt>
        > UNSUBSCRIBE: E-mail sca-jml-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com</tt>
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > <tt>Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
        > Service.</tt></br>
        >
        > </span></span>
        >
        >
      • Ii Saburou
        ... I have seen pictures of what appears to be applique on various jinbaori. However, I don t know if the technique would have been applied to other garments,
        Message 3 of 5 , Oct 7, 2002
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          On Mon, 7 Oct 2002, ELAINE KOOGLER wrote:

          > To be honest, I'd go with the latter...sounds like it would be
          > absolutely lovely, and would be your very own design. Another note:
          > depending on how the colors work in the piece you describe as having
          > dragons on it, you could potentially do an embroidered sort of thing on
          > that as well. I personally love doing applique, but my research tells
          > me that it wasn't done very often...however I have found some
          > references to the technique in period...in fact one reference cites
          > some Haniwa figures as having a design on the garment that looks like
          > applique!
          >
          I have seen pictures of what appears to be applique on various jinbaori.
          However, I don't know if the technique would have been applied to other
          garments, jinbaori being somewhat special, it would seem.

          -Ii
        • makiwara_no_yetsuko
          ... options ... here, ... Is black a color that would ve been worn by a lady and if so, in what period(s), and for what occasions or seasons? I m curious. ;-
          Message 4 of 5 , Oct 9, 2002
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            --- In sca-jml@y..., "skyscraperpriestess" <rjb@n...> wrote:
            > I am eventually planning to make an Uchikake for myself, and was
            > wondering what the best course of action would be. I have two
            options
            > right now.
            > The first is this- my local fabric store is selling some lovely
            > chinese brocade- black, with dragons all over. I was thinking this
            > might look pretty close to real. I cannot find Japanese brocades
            here,
            > chinese is the closest I can get.

            Is black a color that would've been worn by a lady and if so, in what
            period(s), and for what occasions or seasons? I'm curious. ;->

            I'm starting work on a Heian uchiki in kuchiba ("dead leaf" yellow),
            to be ornamented with block printing, because $12 a yard for 29 inch
            wide rayon brocade is not in my budget! The outfit is inspired by
            one I saw at the website for the Kyoto costume museum.

            (http://www.iz2.or.jp/english/fukusyoku/wayou/index.htm Click on the
            Heian period and pick the 7th costume down, a court lady in informal
            winter dress.)

            If I pull it off, I'll post photos of the results.

            Makiwara no Yetsuko
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