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Archeologists find Mongol ship from 1281 invasion

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  • Anthony J. Bryant
    Archeologists find a wreck of the kamikaze http://www.canada.com/search/site/story.asp?id=39084A94-8736-47F1-B8F3-A82F019F1F9C Vancouver Sun Saturday,
    Message 1 of 2 , Sep 10, 2002
    • 0 Attachment
      Archeologists find a wreck of the kamikaze
      http://www.canada.com/search/site/story.asp?id=39084A94-8736-47F1-B8F3-A82F019F1F9C



      Vancouver Sun

      Saturday, September 07, 2002


      In what marine archeologists are calling one of the greatest
      finds of all
      time, the remains of a ship that sank in one of history's largest
      sea
      battles has been located off the southern coast of Japan.

      Since last fall, Japanese archeologists have quietly worked
      beneath the
      waters off Takashima Island to retrieve the remains of a warship
      from
      Kublai Khan's failed invasion of Japan in 1281.

      The fate of the expedition, an enormous undertaking involving
      4,000 ships
      and more than 100,000 men, most of whom perished, was decided by
      a storm --
      named kamikaze by the Japanese -- that sank the invading fleet.
      Marco Polo
      first told the Western world of the disaster.

      Vancouver Maritime Museum executive director and underwater
      archeologist
      James Delgado says that while earlier discoveries in the 1980s
      found
      artifacts from the invasion fleet, those discoveries were like
      finding
      broken pots and scraps of linen in Egypt's Valley of the Kings.

      The discovery of the wreck of the Khan's ship, he says, is like
      finding the
      tomb of Tutankhamun: "The contents have been tossed and tumbled,
      but what
      we're seeing on the bottom is an incredible treasure trove from
      the Khan's
      great fleet."

      Donny Hamilton president of the Institute of Nautical Archeology
      in Texas,
      said the find opens the door on an event that shaped the way the
      world
      developed.

      "It's going to capture a pivotal time in history. Essentially
      this is what
      stopped the expansion of the Kublai Khan empire. You can imagine
      how things
      would have turned out differently if they had captured Japan.
      Instead of
      there being a separate Japan, Japan would have been a part of
      China."

      Delgado, host of National Geographic and History Television's The
      Sea
      Hunters, was permitted to dive with the Japanese archaeologists
      as they
      recovered incredible deep-sea treasures, many of them amazingly
      well
      preserved after 721 years of burial beneath the seabed.

      Today, in a world exclusive for The Vancouver Sun, he tells the
      story of
      the greatest seaborne invasion the world would know until the
      mid-20th
      century.
    • Brian Dean
      thats pretty cool, i wonder what kind of artifacts they will bring, up. So, i wonder , if the great kami didnt stop the Khans army, Would there be a japan
      Message 2 of 2 , Sep 10, 2002
      • 0 Attachment
        thats pretty cool, i wonder what kind of artifacts they will bring, up.
        So, i wonder , if the great kami didnt stop the Khans army, Would there be a
        japan today, all i remember reading in the books published was that japan at
        that time did not have the standing armies that they had during the Sengoku
        period, that they were small by comparison, 2-300 man per clan or such, Mr
        Bryant, could you confirm this for me,
        I am just curious how the samurai and peasants held off the first attack.



        >From: "Anthony J. Bryant" <ajbryant@...>
        >Reply-To: sca-jml@yahoogroups.com
        >To: JML SCA <sca-jml@yahoogroups.com>
        >Subject: [SCA-JML] Archeologists find Mongol ship from 1281 invasion
        >Date: Tue, 10 Sep 2002 13:36:55 -0500
        >
        >Archeologists find a wreck of the kamikaze
        >http://www.canada.com/search/site/story.asp?id=39084A94-8736-47F1-B8F3-A82F019F1F9C
        >
        >
        >
        >Vancouver Sun
        >
        >Saturday, September 07, 2002
        >
        >
        >In what marine archeologists are calling one of the greatest
        >finds of all
        >time, the remains of a ship that sank in one of history's largest
        >sea
        >battles has been located off the southern coast of Japan.
        >
        >Since last fall, Japanese archeologists have quietly worked
        >beneath the
        >waters off Takashima Island to retrieve the remains of a warship
        >from
        >Kublai Khan's failed invasion of Japan in 1281.
        >
        >The fate of the expedition, an enormous undertaking involving
        >4,000 ships
        >and more than 100,000 men, most of whom perished, was decided by
        >a storm --
        >named kamikaze by the Japanese -- that sank the invading fleet.
        >Marco Polo
        >first told the Western world of the disaster.
        >
        >Vancouver Maritime Museum executive director and underwater
        >archeologist
        >James Delgado says that while earlier discoveries in the 1980s
        >found
        >artifacts from the invasion fleet, those discoveries were like
        >finding
        >broken pots and scraps of linen in Egypt's Valley of the Kings.
        >
        >The discovery of the wreck of the Khan's ship, he says, is like
        >finding the
        >tomb of Tutankhamun: "The contents have been tossed and tumbled,
        >but what
        >we're seeing on the bottom is an incredible treasure trove from
        >the Khan's
        >great fleet."
        >
        >Donny Hamilton president of the Institute of Nautical Archeology
        >in Texas,
        >said the find opens the door on an event that shaped the way the
        >world
        >developed.
        >
        >"It's going to capture a pivotal time in history. Essentially
        >this is what
        >stopped the expansion of the Kublai Khan empire. You can imagine
        >how things
        >would have turned out differently if they had captured Japan.
        >Instead of
        >there being a separate Japan, Japan would have been a part of
        >China."
        >
        >Delgado, host of National Geographic and History Television's The
        >Sea
        >Hunters, was permitted to dive with the Japanese archaeologists
        >as they
        >recovered incredible deep-sea treasures, many of them amazingly
        >well
        >preserved after 721 years of burial beneath the seabed.
        >
        >Today, in a world exclusive for The Vancouver Sun, he tells the
        >story of
        >the greatest seaborne invasion the world would know until the
        >mid-20th
        >century.
        >




        Onishi Hirotaka no Tatsukami no Sohei
        Kenjo to Onishi Katsushima,

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