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Games help?

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  • Mokurai
    Hi, We re looking into games that are Period for late 16th cent. Japan for the event. My games master has found a few leads besides the usual and I was hoping
    Message 1 of 4 , Sep 9, 2002
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      Hi,

      We're looking into games that are Period for late 16th cent. Japan for the
      event. My games master has found a few leads besides the usual and I was
      hoping someone on the list might have some more ideas for resources or be
      able to help us with translating a good games site he found. Take a look at
      what my friend wrote below and if you read Japanese check out the link.

      Domo!

      - mokurai

      PS - If you have anything you want to share, you may want to CC Michel - his
      address is below.

      > -----Original Message-----
      > From: Michel Wolffauer [mailto:keeper@...]
      > I've got a full size Go board, plus three small ones. I can also
      > bring 3-4
      > backgammon boards. I've got two Shogi sets on the way, and I might make
      > some paper sets to give us a few more. Sounds like we should have enough
      > to cover two tables.
      >
      > I did some quick looking into cards arriving in Japan, and found one site
      > which said that the Portuguese crew brought one or more 48 card Hombre
      > (Ombre, L'Hombre) decks with them and it was from these that the Japanese
      > cards developed. I've also seen references to an extinct five suited
      > Portuguese deck - which seems to match the descriptions of some Japanese
      > decks, specifically the ones for a game called "Unsun Karuta". Still
      > trying to find more info on them.
      >
      > Need to find this book:
      > Wayland, Virginia and Harold, with Okusu, Masako
      > Unsun Karuta. The Rules for the Game as played in Hitoyoshi City, Kyusu,
      > Japan. and The History of the Cards and the Game. Waylands,
      > Pasadena, 1981.
      >
      > If you know anyone who can read Japanese, have them look at:
      > http://www.asahi-net.or.jp/~RP9H-TKHS/dentou_j.htm
      > It's a web site full of traditional Japanese games, including board, card
      > and dice games.
      >
      > - Michel
      >
      >
      >
    • Ii Saburou
      I have a hyakunin isshu [100 Poets] card set--of course, it is all in Japanese (I REALLY need to get a romaji set to play with more people). There s
      Message 2 of 4 , Sep 9, 2002
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        I have a 'hyakunin isshu' [100 Poets] card set--of course, it is all in
        Japanese (I REALLY need to get a romaji set to play with more people).
        There's kai-awase (shell matching) but I don't know anyone who has enough
        shells to do that. I wonder if they ever matched cards?

        How about a go board? Go, gomoku, etc. That can even be done on graph
        paper if need be.

        Does anyone know when mahjong appeared and if it made it over to Japan?
        Of course, from what I know about it it has much more serious underworld
        popularity in Asia--whereas here you see it more as a friendly game (I
        could tell stories about my friend's mom and our mahjong games--She was
        from Hong Kong and to her, it was serious.)


        -Ii, not Li... yet...
      • Anthony J. Bryant
        ... How about the standards of go, shogi, and sugoroku? Someone with basis woodworking/cabinetmaking skills can easily produce a Japanese sugoroku board. The
        Message 3 of 4 , Sep 10, 2002
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          Mokurai wrote:

          > Hi,
          >
          > We're looking into games that are Period for late 16th cent. Japan for the
          > event. My games master has found a few leads besides the usual and I was
          > hoping someone on the list might have some more ideas for resources or be
          > able to help us with translating a good games site he found. Take a look at
          > what my friend wrote below and if you read Japanese check out the link.
          >

          How about the standards of go, shogi, and sugoroku? Someone with basis
          woodworking/cabinetmaking skills can easily produce a Japanese sugoroku
          "board." The nice thing is most people already know how to play sugoroku
          (backgammon!) and it's easy to learn the basics of go. Only shogi takes more
          time and effort to learn.

          Effingham
        • Mokurai
          Actually, we already have those covered. I deleted their mention from the original post because I thought it superfluous. Anyway, yes we will have two or three
          Message 4 of 4 , Sep 10, 2002
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            Actually, we already have those covered. I deleted their mention from the
            original post because I thought it superfluous. Anyway, yes we will have two
            or three boards of each of those games present and Michel is familiar with
            all of them and ready to teach. Shogi sets are hardest to come by, however,
            so if anyone has links to good places to buy them, let me know. We are
            looking especially for sets that include the "international symbols" as well
            as or in stead of the kanji - a sacrilege, I know, but useful when it comes
            to teaching. Especially kids.

            - mokurai

            > -----Original Message-----
            > From: Anthony J. Bryant [mailto:ajbryant@...]
            > Sent: Tuesday, September 10, 2002 2:44 PM
            > To: sca-jml@yahoogroups.com
            > Subject: Re: [SCA-JML] Games help?
            >
            >
            > Mokurai wrote:
            >
            > > Hi,
            > >
            > > We're looking into games that are Period for late 16th cent.
            > Japan for the
            > > event. My games master has found a few leads besides the usual and I was
            > > hoping someone on the list might have some more ideas for
            > resources or be
            > > able to help us with translating a good games site he found.
            > Take a look at
            > > what my friend wrote below and if you read Japanese check out the link.
            > >
            >
            > How about the standards of go, shogi, and sugoroku? Someone with basis
            > woodworking/cabinetmaking skills can easily produce a Japanese sugoroku
            > "board." The nice thing is most people already know how to play sugoroku
            > (backgammon!) and it's easy to learn the basics of go. Only shogi
            > takes more
            > time and effort to learn.
            >
            > Effingham
            >
            >
            >
            >
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            >
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            >
            >
            >
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