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[SCA-JML] Kendo gi and hakama

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  • fsjlb4
    Gomen kudasai, I am curious as to how close the kendo gi and hakama of today are to the gi and hakama of the samurai. Has this training costume changed
    Message 1 of 3 , Oct 24, 1999
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      Gomen kudasai,

      I am curious as to how close the kendo gi and hakama of today are to the gi
      and hakama of the samurai. Has this training costume changed considerably
      between 1500 and modern day? I am not entirely familiar with the history of
      kendo, or at least when it changed to a sport. Could anyone enlighten me
      here? (The question arises from a quote on a kendo page that claims the gi
      and hakama are exactly the same as those used by the samurai).


      Domo Arigato Gozaimasu

      -Godric Logan
    • Anthony J. Bryant
      ... About as close as baseball gear is to real clothing. Kendo stuff is sporting wear, not clothes. Historically, there *was* no special gear for sport or
      Message 2 of 3 , Oct 24, 1999
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        fsjlb4 wrote:

        > Gomen kudasai,
        >
        > I am curious as to how close the kendo gi and hakama of today are to the gi
        > and hakama of the samurai. Has this training costume changed considerably
        > between 1500 and modern day? I am not entirely familiar with the history of
        > kendo, or at least when it changed to a sport. Could anyone enlighten me
        > here? (The question arises from a quote on a kendo page that claims the gi
        > and hakama are exactly the same as those used by the samurai).

        About as close as baseball gear is to real clothing.

        Kendo stuff is sporting wear, not clothes. Historically, there *was* no special
        gear for "sport" or athletic endeavors.

        For one thing, no one wore a "gi." They wore either their regular clothing, or
        a special type of kimono like garment called a "yoroi shita" or "yoroi shitagi"
        (shitagi, here, of course, means "worn under") The shitagi had a small button
        at the collar (one of the few Japanese garments to use buttons) to help keep it
        closed, and had a self-belt (that is, it had a waist tie like a short obi made
        of the same cloth). It was about butt-length, and had shortish, close-fitted
        sleeves (compared to regular kimono). Most people, however, wore a normal
        kosode (kimono) under their armour. Generals and people with rank and money
        wore something called a yoroi hitatare, which is a matching hakama and over
        robe with big, puffy sleeves.

        Period hakama had several different types and patterns. The general difference
        is that they mostly didn't overlap the legs like they do now. (Look at a flat
        hakama. Notice how the folding over- and underlaps so that there's no way to
        tell where one leg ends and the next begins. In period, they were folded, but
        separate. Generally.) Another big difference is that the back panel is modern.
        It didn't exist in period.

        Kendo became a sport in the late 1800s.

        Effingham
      • Barbara Nostrand
        Noble Cousin! The emergence of kendo as a sport is generally attributed to Miyamoto Masana aka Musashi, but all of the currently extant schools are probably
        Message 3 of 3 , Oct 24, 1999
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          Noble Cousin!

          The emergence of kendo as a sport is generally attributed to Miyamoto
          Masana aka Musashi, but all of the currently extant schools are probably
          more recent than that. One of the features of the Arts Scene under the
          Tokugawa Bakufu was that in order to practice and teach an art you had
          to demonstrate a number of things including antiquity, legitimate
          transmission, an artistic theory and a secret tradition.

          Your Humble Servant
          Solveig Throndardottir
          Amateur Scholar

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