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Re: [SCA-JML] Name look alright?

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  • Anthony J. Bryant
    ... Looks perfect to me. ... It did indeed. ... The nanori *is* your personal name; the family would call you Ryojiro. Are you thnking of a nickname? There s
    Message 1 of 3 , May 7, 2002
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      Ka'linor Ferrari wrote:

      > Konnichi Wa!
      >
      > I've been doing some research at the Japanese
      > Miscellany and I think I have a name
      >
      > Yamamoto no Ryojiro Michiyoshi
      >

      Looks perfect to me.

      >
      > Used Yamamoto becasue my persona was born under a
      > mountain. I used the Surname no zokumyo nanori form
      > found in the Miscellany. But I had a couple of
      > questions:
      >
      > 1)Did the zokumyo (Ryojiro or "Good second son") come
      > out the way I wanted it to?
      >

      It did indeed.

      >
      > 2)Could I stick a personal name after my nanori so
      > family can call me that instead of that big long name?

      The nanori *is* your personal name; the family would call you Ryojiro. Are
      you thnking of a nickname? There's little evidence that the Japanese
      shortened their names like we do until late period. The actual *use* of the
      name (as opposed to a title or surname) is the informality we Americans
      would associate with using a nickname. If shortened, it would likely be only
      the first kanji ("Ryo-sama!!!") or something to that effect. But again,
      that's a level of familiarity that would be astounding in historical
      Japanese usage.

      > P.S.-Are there any good websites on writing etiquette
      > or etiquette in general in medieval Japan? What about
      > an explanation about some of the suffixes like
      > "-dono"? Thanks!

      Check out mine at http://www.sengokudaimyo.com and go for the Miscellany. As
      for writing etiquette -- unless you speak Japanese, that would be rather
      pointless. There are a great many set and frozen phrases and word forms that
      just don't translate.

      Effingham
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