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Azuchi-Momoyama Period Architecture

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  • Ash Smith
    Does anyone have pictures (or know where some can be found) or Azuchi-Momoyama period architecture? Everything from a normal home to the fancy stuff...
    Message 1 of 11 , Mar 28, 2002
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      Does anyone have pictures (or know where some can be found) or
      Azuchi-Momoyama period architecture?
      Everything from a normal home to the fancy stuff... optimally I'm looking
      for something that might be the home of a mid-level samurai/etc.
      I am looking at building a collapsable Japanese-style structure for events,
      but I need to find out more about the styling first hehe.

      Thanks,
      --Ash

      It is ironic that those who most passionately advocate destruction of the
      enemy, often are at the highest loss to explain why they themselves have the
      right to survive.
    • Ii Saburou
      ... You too? I ve got a similar project of my own. I don t have any organization to it, but modzer0.cs.uaf.edu/~logan/images and
      Message 2 of 11 , Mar 29, 2002
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        On Fri, 29 Mar 2002, Ash Smith wrote:

        > Does anyone have pictures (or know where some can be found) or
        > Azuchi-Momoyama period architecture?
        > Everything from a normal home to the fancy stuff... optimally I'm looking
        > for something that might be the home of a mid-level samurai/etc.
        > I am looking at building a collapsable Japanese-style structure for events,
        > but I need to find out more about the styling first hehe.

        You too? I've got a similar project of my own.

        I don't have any organization to it, but
        "modzer0.cs.uaf.edu/~logan/images" and
        "modzer0.cs.uaf.edu/~logan/pictures" should have photos in them with
        various shrines (jinja) and castles. Not sure if it will help or not, but
        you can look through--unfortunately there isn't much there.

        BTW, let me know what you come up with for a roof--that is where I am
        stuck on my current project. I have some ideas, but I'm not sure how to
        put a roof on without nails. I'm guessing that's what the rocks are for
        on many village houses? Anyway...

        -Ii
      • Nate Ledbetter
        If you can find any pictures of Kurashiki, I know they have a samurai-machi that was basically the mid-low level samurai neighborhood for retainers of the
        Message 3 of 11 , Mar 29, 2002
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          If you can find any pictures of Kurashiki, I know they
          have a "samurai-machi" that was basically the mid-low
          level samurai neighborhood for retainers of the Mori
          family. Hopefully that gives you a place to start...I
          can't think of where I've seen the pictures.

          Shonaigawa

          --- Ii Saburou <logan@...> wrote:
          > On Fri, 29 Mar 2002, Ash Smith wrote:
          >
          > > Does anyone have pictures (or know where some can
          > be found) or
          > > Azuchi-Momoyama period architecture?
          > > Everything from a normal home to the fancy
          > stuff... optimally I'm looking
          > > for something that might be the home of a
          > mid-level samurai/etc.
          > > I am looking at building a collapsable
          > Japanese-style structure for events,
          > > but I need to find out more about the styling
          > first hehe.
          >
          > You too? I've got a similar project of my own.
          >
          > I don't have any organization to it, but
          > "modzer0.cs.uaf.edu/~logan/images" and
          > "modzer0.cs.uaf.edu/~logan/pictures" should have
          > photos in them with
          > various shrines (jinja) and castles. Not sure if it
          > will help or not, but
          > you can look through--unfortunately there isn't much
          > there.
          >
          > BTW, let me know what you come up with for a
          > roof--that is where I am
          > stuck on my current project. I have some ideas, but
          > I'm not sure how to
          > put a roof on without nails. I'm guessing that's
          > what the rocks are for
          > on many village houses? Anyway...
          >
          > -Ii
          >
          >


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        • Ash Smith
          I m thinking the easiest thing to base a design off of would be the Zen inspired architecture you see in many movies... Best example I can think of is in
          Message 4 of 11 , Mar 29, 2002
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            I'm thinking the easiest thing to base a design off of would be the Zen
            inspired architecture you see in many movies...
            Best example I can think of is in karate kid when they go to Okinawa, the
            house there... basically the walls are wooden "window" type frames with rice
            paper.
            But I have no idea how period the type of "Zen" architecture from movies is.
            Anyone know? I've seen many SIMILAR designs from Buddhist temples, so it's
            not hard to imagine that it COULD have been used for residential
            buildings... perhaps that's good enough for anachronism? :)

            The roof in my design is likely going to be colored fiberglass that sets on
            two trusses.
            The trusses would attach to the walls with a notched insert... sort of like
            a "L" turned 90 degrees clockwise (I got the idea from the way many beds
            snap together).
            So it would fit together somewhat like a puzzle box.
            And of course I'll be using a plastic/tarp instead of actual paper so it can
            fold/refold and keep out water, and generally be more durable while still
            conveying the same look.

            --Ash

            It is ironic that those who most passionately advocate destruction of the
            enemy, often are at the highest loss to explain why they themselves have the
            right to survive.
          • Mokurai
            You re ok with the Periodness of a traditional home using shoji screens and wood panels for the walls. I can recommend two books: A Japanese Touch for your
            Message 5 of 11 , Mar 29, 2002
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              You're ok with the Periodness of a traditional home using shoji screens and
              wood panels for the walls. I can recommend two books:

              "A Japanese Touch for your Home" - explains Japanese spatial relations,
              materials and design principles. It is essentially modern, but a lot of the
              designs and concepts are Period. Excellent photos.

              "Japanese Folkhouses" - discusses the large A-frame homes of Rural Japan.
              (not unlike the bandit's hideout in Seven Samurai - but much better built
              and more comfortable) These are quite ancient in design, but are obviously
              not what you are trying to build. Still, a lot of good info and photographs.
              You may want to consider using some of their interior layout ideas - such as
              the raised floor surrounded by earth - might be good for a Pennsic house.

              Also, books like the "Sakuteiki" and "World of the Shining Prince" include
              discussions of Heian Shinden-style houses; many of the elements of which
              persisted throughout our period.

              I would not recommend basing too much of your design on Buddhist temple
              layouts as they were often much more symmetrical in their layout and also
              rather "heavy" - that is to say, big beams, big roofs, and often intense
              ornamentation.

              On the other hand, take a look at tea rooms and tea huts - they have a lot
              of the elements you want and really came into their own in the Momoyama
              period. They're also quite small, which may be helpful in translating your
              ideas into a transportable SCA structure.

              Ii really is the authority on this stuff. Kuji-dono, if he is lurking right
              now, has also built a transportable Japanese house for SCA. He has some
              other book recommendations, as I recall.

              - mokurai


              -----Original Message-----
              From: Ash Smith [mailto:chronoknight@...]
              Sent: Friday, March 29, 2002 2:50 PM
              To: sca-jml@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: Re: [SCA-JML] Azuchi-Momoyama Period Architecture


              I'm thinking the easiest thing to base a design off of would be the Zen
              inspired architecture you see in many movies...
              Best example I can think of is in karate kid when they go to Okinawa, the
              house there... basically the walls are wooden "window" type frames with rice
              paper.
              But I have no idea how period the type of "Zen" architecture from movies is.
              Anyone know? I've seen many SIMILAR designs from Buddhist temples, so it's
              not hard to imagine that it COULD have been used for residential
              buildings... perhaps that's good enough for anachronism? :)

              The roof in my design is likely going to be colored fiberglass that sets on
              two trusses.
              The trusses would attach to the walls with a notched insert... sort of like
              a "L" turned 90 degrees clockwise (I got the idea from the way many beds
              snap together).
              So it would fit together somewhat like a puzzle box.
              And of course I'll be using a plastic/tarp instead of actual paper so it can
              fold/refold and keep out water, and generally be more durable while still
              conveying the same look.

              --Ash

              It is ironic that those who most passionately advocate destruction of the
              enemy, often are at the highest loss to explain why they themselves have the
              right to survive.



              UNSUBSCRIBE: E-mail sca-jml-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

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            • Mokurai
              One other thing - tyvek (without the name printed all over it) and pellon (a fabric interfacing material) are both good alternatives to rice paper for making
              Message 6 of 11 , Mar 29, 2002
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                One other thing - tyvek (without the name printed all over it) and pellon (a
                fabric interfacing material) are both good alternatives to rice paper for
                making weather-resistant shoji. Only snag being that they don't breathe as
                well, of course.

                - mokurai


                -----Original Message-----
                From: Mokurai [mailto:mokurai@...]
                Sent: Friday, March 29, 2002 3:48 PM
                To: sca-jml@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: RE: [SCA-JML] Azuchi-Momoyama Period Architecture


                You're ok with the Periodness of a traditional home using shoji screens and
                wood panels for the walls. I can recommend two books:

                "A Japanese Touch for your Home" - explains Japanese spatial relations,
                materials and design principles. It is essentially modern, but a lot of the
                designs and concepts are Period. Excellent photos.

                "Japanese Folkhouses" - discusses the large A-frame homes of Rural Japan.
                (not unlike the bandit's hideout in Seven Samurai - but much better built
                and more comfortable) These are quite ancient in design, but are obviously
                not what you are trying to build. Still, a lot of good info and photographs.
                You may want to consider using some of their interior layout ideas - such as
                the raised floor surrounded by earth - might be good for a Pennsic house.

                Also, books like the "Sakuteiki" and "World of the Shining Prince" include
                discussions of Heian Shinden-style houses; many of the elements of which
                persisted throughout our period.

                I would not recommend basing too much of your design on Buddhist temple
                layouts as they were often much more symmetrical in their layout and also
                rather "heavy" - that is to say, big beams, big roofs, and often intense
                ornamentation.

                On the other hand, take a look at tea rooms and tea huts - they have a lot
                of the elements you want and really came into their own in the Momoyama
                period. They're also quite small, which may be helpful in translating your
                ideas into a transportable SCA structure.

                Ii really is the authority on this stuff. Kuji-dono, if he is lurking right
                now, has also built a transportable Japanese house for SCA. He has some
                other book recommendations, as I recall.

                - mokurai


                -----Original Message-----
                From: Ash Smith [mailto:chronoknight@...]
                Sent: Friday, March 29, 2002 2:50 PM
                To: sca-jml@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: Re: [SCA-JML] Azuchi-Momoyama Period Architecture


                I'm thinking the easiest thing to base a design off of would be the Zen
                inspired architecture you see in many movies...
                Best example I can think of is in karate kid when they go to Okinawa, the
                house there... basically the walls are wooden "window" type frames with rice
                paper.
                But I have no idea how period the type of "Zen" architecture from movies is.
                Anyone know? I've seen many SIMILAR designs from Buddhist temples, so it's
                not hard to imagine that it COULD have been used for residential
                buildings... perhaps that's good enough for anachronism? :)

                The roof in my design is likely going to be colored fiberglass that sets on
                two trusses.
                The trusses would attach to the walls with a notched insert... sort of like
                a "L" turned 90 degrees clockwise (I got the idea from the way many beds
                snap together).
                So it would fit together somewhat like a puzzle box.
                And of course I'll be using a plastic/tarp instead of actual paper so it can
                fold/refold and keep out water, and generally be more durable while still
                conveying the same look.

                --Ash

                It is ironic that those who most passionately advocate destruction of the
                enemy, often are at the highest loss to explain why they themselves have the
                right to survive.



                UNSUBSCRIBE: E-mail sca-jml-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

                Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/





                UNSUBSCRIBE: E-mail sca-jml-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

                Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
              • Ash Smith
                Ok, I will check those out, I was actually thinking of using a fleshtone/white plastic simply for durability and weather-resistance. --Ash It is ironic that
                Message 7 of 11 , Mar 29, 2002
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                  Ok, I will check those out, I was actually thinking of using a
                  fleshtone/white plastic simply for durability and weather-resistance.

                  --Ash

                  It is ironic that those who most passionately advocate destruction of the
                  enemy, often are at the highest loss to explain why they themselves have the
                  right to survive.
                  ----- Original Message -----
                  From: Mokurai <mokurai@...>
                  To: <sca-jml@yahoogroups.com>
                  Sent: Friday, March 29, 2002 5:37 PM
                  Subject: RE: [SCA-JML] Azuchi-Momoyama Period Architecture


                  > One other thing - tyvek (without the name printed all over it) and pellon
                  (a
                  > fabric interfacing material) are both good alternatives to rice paper for
                  > making weather-resistant shoji. Only snag being that they don't breathe as
                  > well, of course.
                  >
                  > - mokurai
                  >
                  >
                  > -----Original Message-----
                  > From: Mokurai [mailto:mokurai@...]
                  > Sent: Friday, March 29, 2002 3:48 PM
                  > To: sca-jml@yahoogroups.com
                  > Subject: RE: [SCA-JML] Azuchi-Momoyama Period Architecture
                  >
                  >
                  > You're ok with the Periodness of a traditional home using shoji screens
                  and
                  > wood panels for the walls. I can recommend two books:
                  >
                  > "A Japanese Touch for your Home" - explains Japanese spatial relations,
                  > materials and design principles. It is essentially modern, but a lot of
                  the
                  > designs and concepts are Period. Excellent photos.
                  >
                  > "Japanese Folkhouses" - discusses the large A-frame homes of Rural Japan.
                  > (not unlike the bandit's hideout in Seven Samurai - but much better built
                  > and more comfortable) These are quite ancient in design, but are obviously
                  > not what you are trying to build. Still, a lot of good info and
                  photographs.
                  > You may want to consider using some of their interior layout ideas - such
                  as
                  > the raised floor surrounded by earth - might be good for a Pennsic house.
                  >
                  > Also, books like the "Sakuteiki" and "World of the Shining Prince" include
                  > discussions of Heian Shinden-style houses; many of the elements of which
                  > persisted throughout our period.
                  >
                  > I would not recommend basing too much of your design on Buddhist temple
                  > layouts as they were often much more symmetrical in their layout and also
                  > rather "heavy" - that is to say, big beams, big roofs, and often intense
                  > ornamentation.
                  >
                  > On the other hand, take a look at tea rooms and tea huts - they have a lot
                  > of the elements you want and really came into their own in the Momoyama
                  > period. They're also quite small, which may be helpful in translating your
                  > ideas into a transportable SCA structure.
                  >
                  > Ii really is the authority on this stuff. Kuji-dono, if he is lurking
                  right
                  > now, has also built a transportable Japanese house for SCA. He has some
                  > other book recommendations, as I recall.
                  >
                  > - mokurai
                  >
                  >
                  > -----Original Message-----
                  > From: Ash Smith [mailto:chronoknight@...]
                  > Sent: Friday, March 29, 2002 2:50 PM
                  > To: sca-jml@yahoogroups.com
                  > Subject: Re: [SCA-JML] Azuchi-Momoyama Period Architecture
                  >
                  >
                  > I'm thinking the easiest thing to base a design off of would be the Zen
                  > inspired architecture you see in many movies...
                  > Best example I can think of is in karate kid when they go to Okinawa, the
                  > house there... basically the walls are wooden "window" type frames with
                  rice
                  > paper.
                  > But I have no idea how period the type of "Zen" architecture from movies
                  is.
                  > Anyone know? I've seen many SIMILAR designs from Buddhist temples, so it's
                  > not hard to imagine that it COULD have been used for residential
                  > buildings... perhaps that's good enough for anachronism? :)
                  >
                  > The roof in my design is likely going to be colored fiberglass that sets
                  on
                  > two trusses.
                  > The trusses would attach to the walls with a notched insert... sort of
                  like
                  > a "L" turned 90 degrees clockwise (I got the idea from the way many beds
                  > snap together).
                  > So it would fit together somewhat like a puzzle box.
                  > And of course I'll be using a plastic/tarp instead of actual paper so it
                  can
                  > fold/refold and keep out water, and generally be more durable while still
                  > conveying the same look.
                  >
                  > --Ash
                  >
                  > It is ironic that those who most passionately advocate destruction of the
                  > enemy, often are at the highest loss to explain why they themselves have
                  the
                  > right to survive.
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > UNSUBSCRIBE: E-mail sca-jml-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                  >
                  > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > UNSUBSCRIBE: E-mail sca-jml-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                  >
                  > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > UNSUBSCRIBE: E-mail sca-jml-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                  >
                  > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                  >
                  >
                  >
                • Mokurai
                  Well, the tyvec _is_ plastic and is nice and white with the consistency of paper. I have a lamp made with it and it is really cool. Also inexpensive. Like I
                  Message 8 of 11 , Mar 29, 2002
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                    Well, the tyvec _is_ plastic and is nice and white with the consistency of
                    paper. I have a lamp made with it and it is really cool. Also inexpensive.
                    Like I said, the trick is finding it for sale without any printing on it,
                    but try some decent building supply places and you should succeed.

                    - mokurai

                    -----Original Message-----
                    From: Ash Smith [mailto:chronoknight@...]
                    Sent: Friday, March 29, 2002 6:26 PM
                    To: sca-jml@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: Re: [SCA-JML] Azuchi-Momoyama Period Architecture


                    Ok, I will check those out, I was actually thinking of using a
                    fleshtone/white plastic simply for durability and weather-resistance.

                    --Ash

                    It is ironic that those who most passionately advocate destruction of the
                    enemy, often are at the highest loss to explain why they themselves have the
                    right to survive.
                    ----- Original Message -----
                    From: Mokurai <mokurai@...>
                    To: <sca-jml@yahoogroups.com>
                    Sent: Friday, March 29, 2002 5:37 PM
                    Subject: RE: [SCA-JML] Azuchi-Momoyama Period Architecture


                    > One other thing - tyvek (without the name printed all over it) and pellon
                    (a
                    > fabric interfacing material) are both good alternatives to rice paper for
                    > making weather-resistant shoji. Only snag being that they don't breathe as
                    > well, of course.
                    >
                    > - mokurai
                    >
                    >
                    > -----Original Message-----
                    > From: Mokurai [mailto:mokurai@...]
                    > Sent: Friday, March 29, 2002 3:48 PM
                    > To: sca-jml@yahoogroups.com
                    > Subject: RE: [SCA-JML] Azuchi-Momoyama Period Architecture
                    >
                    >
                    > You're ok with the Periodness of a traditional home using shoji screens
                    and
                    > wood panels for the walls. I can recommend two books:
                    >
                    > "A Japanese Touch for your Home" - explains Japanese spatial relations,
                    > materials and design principles. It is essentially modern, but a lot of
                    the
                    > designs and concepts are Period. Excellent photos.
                    >
                    > "Japanese Folkhouses" - discusses the large A-frame homes of Rural Japan.
                    > (not unlike the bandit's hideout in Seven Samurai - but much better built
                    > and more comfortable) These are quite ancient in design, but are obviously
                    > not what you are trying to build. Still, a lot of good info and
                    photographs.
                    > You may want to consider using some of their interior layout ideas - such
                    as
                    > the raised floor surrounded by earth - might be good for a Pennsic house.
                    >
                    > Also, books like the "Sakuteiki" and "World of the Shining Prince" include
                    > discussions of Heian Shinden-style houses; many of the elements of which
                    > persisted throughout our period.
                    >
                    > I would not recommend basing too much of your design on Buddhist temple
                    > layouts as they were often much more symmetrical in their layout and also
                    > rather "heavy" - that is to say, big beams, big roofs, and often intense
                    > ornamentation.
                    >
                    > On the other hand, take a look at tea rooms and tea huts - they have a lot
                    > of the elements you want and really came into their own in the Momoyama
                    > period. They're also quite small, which may be helpful in translating your
                    > ideas into a transportable SCA structure.
                    >
                    > Ii really is the authority on this stuff. Kuji-dono, if he is lurking
                    right
                    > now, has also built a transportable Japanese house for SCA. He has some
                    > other book recommendations, as I recall.
                    >
                    > - mokurai
                    >
                    >
                    > -----Original Message-----
                    > From: Ash Smith [mailto:chronoknight@...]
                    > Sent: Friday, March 29, 2002 2:50 PM
                    > To: sca-jml@yahoogroups.com
                    > Subject: Re: [SCA-JML] Azuchi-Momoyama Period Architecture
                    >
                    >
                    > I'm thinking the easiest thing to base a design off of would be the Zen
                    > inspired architecture you see in many movies...
                    > Best example I can think of is in karate kid when they go to Okinawa, the
                    > house there... basically the walls are wooden "window" type frames with
                    rice
                    > paper.
                    > But I have no idea how period the type of "Zen" architecture from movies
                    is.
                    > Anyone know? I've seen many SIMILAR designs from Buddhist temples, so it's
                    > not hard to imagine that it COULD have been used for residential
                    > buildings... perhaps that's good enough for anachronism? :)
                    >
                    > The roof in my design is likely going to be colored fiberglass that sets
                    on
                    > two trusses.
                    > The trusses would attach to the walls with a notched insert... sort of
                    like
                    > a "L" turned 90 degrees clockwise (I got the idea from the way many beds
                    > snap together).
                    > So it would fit together somewhat like a puzzle box.
                    > And of course I'll be using a plastic/tarp instead of actual paper so it
                    can
                    > fold/refold and keep out water, and generally be more durable while still
                    > conveying the same look.
                    >
                    > --Ash
                    >
                    > It is ironic that those who most passionately advocate destruction of the
                    > enemy, often are at the highest loss to explain why they themselves have
                    the
                    > right to survive.
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > UNSUBSCRIBE: E-mail sca-jml-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                    >
                    > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > UNSUBSCRIBE: E-mail sca-jml-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                    >
                    > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > UNSUBSCRIBE: E-mail sca-jml-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                    >
                    > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                    >
                    >
                    >



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                  • kujika@aol.com
                    books on Japanese architecture 1 Japanese homes and there design 2 what is Japanese architecture if you have any questions about my home please feel free to
                    Message 9 of 11 , Mar 30, 2002
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                      books on Japanese architecture
                      1 Japanese homes and there design
                      2 what is Japanese architecture
                      if you have any questions about my home please feel free to ask there will be
                      a web page about it someday soon


                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • elsyr@attbi.com
                      Another alternative to paper for shoji, although perhaps not as durable as Tyvek, would be the heavier weights of silkspan sold for covering large stick built
                      Message 10 of 11 , Apr 1, 2002
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Another alternative to paper for shoji, although perhaps
                        not as durable as Tyvek, would be the heavier weights of
                        silkspan sold for covering large stick built model
                        airplanes. From mail order outlets, it's not terribly
                        expensive and there are a number of brand names
                        available. When treated with a sealant such as butyrate
                        or nitrate dope, it shrinks to provide tension, and
                        becomes quite waterproof. As with the other materials,
                        of course, once sealed it will not breathe as well as
                        paper.

                        Sakurakawa
                        > Well, the tyvec _is_ plastic and is nice and white with the consistency of
                        > paper. I have a lamp made with it and it is really cool. Also inexpensive.
                        > Like I said, the trick is finding it for sale without any printing on it,
                        > but try some decent building supply places and you should succeed.
                        >
                        > - mokurai
                        >
                        > -----Original Message-----
                        > From: Ash Smith [mailto:chronoknight@...]
                        > Sent: Friday, March 29, 2002 6:26 PM
                        > To: sca-jml@yahoogroups.com
                        > Subject: Re: [SCA-JML] Azuchi-Momoyama Period Architecture
                        >
                        >
                        > Ok, I will check those out, I was actually thinking of using a
                        > fleshtone/white plastic simply for durability and weather-resistance.
                        >
                        > --Ash
                        >
                        > It is ironic that those who most passionately advocate destruction of the
                        > enemy, often are at the highest loss to explain why they themselves have the
                        > right to survive.
                        > ----- Original Message -----
                        > From: Mokurai <mokurai@...>
                        > To: <sca-jml@yahoogroups.com>
                        > Sent: Friday, March 29, 2002 5:37 PM
                        > Subject: RE: [SCA-JML] Azuchi-Momoyama Period Architecture
                        >
                        >
                        > > One other thing - tyvek (without the name printed all over it) and pellon
                        > (a
                        > > fabric interfacing material) are both good alternatives to rice paper for
                        > > making weather-resistant shoji. Only snag being that they don't breathe as
                        > > well, of course.
                        > >
                        > > - mokurai
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > -----Original Message-----
                        > > From: Mokurai [mailto:mokurai@...]
                        > > Sent: Friday, March 29, 2002 3:48 PM
                        > > To: sca-jml@yahoogroups.com
                        > > Subject: RE: [SCA-JML] Azuchi-Momoyama Period Architecture
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > You're ok with the Periodness of a traditional home using shoji screens
                        > and
                        > > wood panels for the walls. I can recommend two books:
                        > >
                        > > "A Japanese Touch for your Home" - explains Japanese spatial relations,
                        > > materials and design principles. It is essentially modern, but a lot of
                        > the
                        > > designs and concepts are Period. Excellent photos.
                        > >
                        > > "Japanese Folkhouses" - discusses the large A-frame homes of Rural Japan.
                        > > (not unlike the bandit's hideout in Seven Samurai - but much better built
                        > > and more comfortable) These are quite ancient in design, but are obviously
                        > > not what you are trying to build. Still, a lot of good info and
                        > photographs.
                        > > You may want to consider using some of their interior layout ideas - such
                        > as
                        > > the raised floor surrounded by earth - might be good for a Pennsic house.
                        > >
                        > > Also, books like the "Sakuteiki" and "World of the Shining Prince" include
                        > > discussions of Heian Shinden-style houses; many of the elements of which
                        > > persisted throughout our period.
                        > >
                        > > I would not recommend basing too much of your design on Buddhist temple
                        > > layouts as they were often much more symmetrical in their layout and also
                        > > rather "heavy" - that is to say, big beams, big roofs, and often intense
                        > > ornamentation.
                        > >
                        > > On the other hand, take a look at tea rooms and tea huts - they have a lot
                        > > of the elements you want and really came into their own in the Momoyama
                        > > period. They're also quite small, which may be helpful in translating your
                        > > ideas into a transportable SCA structure.
                        > >
                        > > Ii really is the authority on this stuff. Kuji-dono, if he is lurking
                        > right
                        > > now, has also built a transportable Japanese house for SCA. He has some
                        > > other book recommendations, as I recall.
                        > >
                        > > - mokurai
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > -----Original Message-----
                        > > From: Ash Smith [mailto:chronoknight@...]
                        > > Sent: Friday, March 29, 2002 2:50 PM
                        > > To: sca-jml@yahoogroups.com
                        > > Subject: Re: [SCA-JML] Azuchi-Momoyama Period Architecture
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > I'm thinking the easiest thing to base a design off of would be the Zen
                        > > inspired architecture you see in many movies...
                        > > Best example I can think of is in karate kid when they go to Okinawa, the
                        > > house there... basically the walls are wooden "window" type frames with
                        > rice
                        > > paper.
                        > > But I have no idea how period the type of "Zen" architecture from movies
                        > is.
                        > > Anyone know? I've seen many SIMILAR designs from Buddhist temples, so it's
                        > > not hard to imagine that it COULD have been used for residential
                        > > buildings... perhaps that's good enough for anachronism? :)
                        > >
                        > > The roof in my design is likely going to be colored fiberglass that sets
                        > on
                        > > two trusses.
                        > > The trusses would attach to the walls with a notched insert... sort of
                        > like
                        > > a "L" turned 90 degrees clockwise (I got the idea from the way many beds
                        > > snap together).
                        > > So it would fit together somewhat like a puzzle box.
                        > > And of course I'll be using a plastic/tarp instead of actual paper so it
                        > can
                        > > fold/refold and keep out water, and generally be more durable while still
                        > > conveying the same look.
                        > >
                        > > --Ash
                        > >
                        > > It is ironic that those who most passionately advocate destruction of the
                        > > enemy, often are at the highest loss to explain why they themselves have
                        > the
                        > > right to survive.
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
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                      • James Eckman
                        ... None of these materials breathe well, that s why builder used to use building paper and its replacements, if your worried about ventilation, you will have
                        Message 11 of 11 , Apr 2, 2002
                        • 0 Attachment
                          > From: elsyr@...
                          >
                          > As with the other materials, of course, once sealed it will not
                          > breathe as well as paper.

                          None of these materials breathe well, that's why builder used to use
                          building paper and its replacements, if your worried about ventilation,
                          you will have to open a door. This means you will need insect repellent
                          or screening material. I wouldn't light a fire inside! Probably not a
                          good idea anyway ;) You will also find that shoji paper is much tougher
                          than you expect when compared to cheap western pulpwood paper. It's
                          replaced yearly in Japan, so for intermittent use, it might last longer
                          than you think.

                          Also the paper can have beautiful watermarks and/or lovely objects
                          imbedded in it.

                          A very good book on the subject is Toshio Odate's 'Making Shoji', he
                          went through a formal apprenticeship for this, its safe to say he's
                          expert. He also writes for Fine Woodworking and others, so his writing
                          is easy to read.

                          There are some paper importers of art paper on my sumi-e page, but you
                          could also try Soko Hardware in San Francisco, they might do mail order
                          and I suspect New York may have something similar along with LA. If you
                          check out the art paper places, ask for mulberry paper for a starting
                          point.

                          http://pages.prodigy.net/fugu/sumi.html

                          Sounds like a fun project, enjoy!

                          Jim Eckman
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