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Japanese Camping

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  • Ii Saburou
    As I learn more and more about Japanese woodworking, I become more confident that I can at least put together a basic framework for a small, 4.5 tatami
    Message 1 of 17 , Jan 15, 2002
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      As I learn more and more about Japanese woodworking, I become more
      confident that I can at least put together a basic framework for a small,
      4.5 tatami 'pavillion'* that I could take down and put up, but I doubt I
      will have something ready for this Pennsic (for one thing, I'm not
      familiar enough with the ground, and it was recommended that I check that
      out first.) Nonetheless, I may try to swing a basic platform that is
      about 2 feet off the ground, then I could cordon it off with something and
      put whatever tent I have on that, and at least keep dry...but I digress.

      My biggest concern for trying anything like that is the roof, in all
      honesty. I just can't figure out what kind of roof would work well.
      Tiles are out, I think, as they would be very heavy and labor intensive.
      This leaves me with either thatching or straight boards or canvas. The
      last is not a period solution, and I'm not sure if it is a practical one.
      As for the thatching, I just don't know how labor intensive that would be
      (wouldn't need it to do more than cover the roof).

      Has anyone had experience with something like this that they could give me
      suggestions? I know there are a few other structures there of one type or
      another; I'm wondering what people do and how to get it to look right.

      -Ii


      *Wooden structure with sliding walls--not a canvas pavillion. See SCA-JML
      archives on Japanese camping equipment to understand why.
    • Ash Smith
      Well, it wouldn t be super period but it d look nice.... to perhaps try painting a canvas to look like tiles. Not sure how well the paint/dye would stay
      Message 2 of 17 , Jan 16, 2002
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        Well, it wouldn't be super period but it'd look nice.... to perhaps try
        painting a canvas to look like tiles. Not sure how well the paint/dye would
        stay though...
        An other thought I had which may be too complex, would be a sectional
        fiberglass roof made to look like tile (i.e.: maybe 4 sections, just so it
        packs down somewhat small)
        But that would require laying out the tile, fiberglassing on that, letting
        it dry, then using that as a mold for the final FG piece.
        Fiberglass is pretty inexpensive now so if you could just BORROW tiles from
        someone for a bit and return them it'd be a pretty inexpensive endeavor,
        just time consuming. (When I last looked the FG material was about $5/yard
        and the resin was something like $30 for enough to do 10 yards ... or
        something along those lines)

        And you could do it in red, or maroon, whatever color, and not worry about
        paint/etc.

        Thatch seems, to me, like it would be a huge pain, especially if you wanted
        to move this around more than twice a year :).
        Boards alone would probably look bad, however it might be possible to attach
        the tiles you mentioned earlier permanently to the boards in such a way that
        you would only need to lay the boards up like a puzzle and lock them in
        place somehow.

        Ok, enough of my crazy ramblings. Good luck with whatever you decide on.

        --Ash

        "In a warrior's life... one should follow the path of light, but nurture the
        darkness within for when it is needed, without allowing it to consume one's
        self." -- Ash (me)

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: Ii Saburou <logan@...>
        To: <sca-jml@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Wednesday, January 16, 2002 12:53 AM
        Subject: [SCA-JML] Japanese Camping


        > As I learn more and more about Japanese woodworking, I become more
        > confident that I can at least put together a basic framework for a small,
        > 4.5 tatami 'pavillion'* that I could take down and put up, but I doubt I
        > will have something ready for this Pennsic (for one thing, I'm not
        > familiar enough with the ground, and it was recommended that I check that
        > out first.) Nonetheless, I may try to swing a basic platform that is
        > about 2 feet off the ground, then I could cordon it off with something and
        > put whatever tent I have on that, and at least keep dry...but I digress.
        >
        > My biggest concern for trying anything like that is the roof, in all
        > honesty. I just can't figure out what kind of roof would work well.
        > Tiles are out, I think, as they would be very heavy and labor intensive.
        > This leaves me with either thatching or straight boards or canvas. The
        > last is not a period solution, and I'm not sure if it is a practical one.
        > As for the thatching, I just don't know how labor intensive that would be
        > (wouldn't need it to do more than cover the roof).
        >
        > Has anyone had experience with something like this that they could give me
        > suggestions? I know there are a few other structures there of one type or
        > another; I'm wondering what people do and how to get it to look right.
        >
        > -Ii
        >
        >
        > *Wooden structure with sliding walls--not a canvas pavillion. See SCA-JML
        > archives on Japanese camping equipment to understand why.
        >
        >
        >
        > UNSUBSCRIBE: E-mail sca-jml-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
        >
        > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
        >
        >
        >
      • Anthony J. Bryant
        ... How will you raise it off the ground and keep it stable? That s the thing that s been bugging me... ... Well, you know, they *did* have plank roofs. Look
        Message 3 of 17 , Jan 16, 2002
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          Ii Saburou wrote:

          > As I learn more and more about Japanese woodworking, I become more
          > confident that I can at least put together a basic framework for a small,
          > 4.5 tatami 'pavillion'* that I could take down and put up, but I doubt I
          > will have something ready for this Pennsic (for one thing, I'm not
          > familiar enough with the ground, and it was recommended that I check that
          > out first.) Nonetheless, I may try to swing a basic platform that is
          > about 2 feet off the ground, then I could cordon it off with something and
          > put whatever tent I have on that, and at least keep dry...but I digress.
          >

          How will you raise it off the ground and keep it stable? That's the thing
          that's been bugging me...

          >
          > My biggest concern for trying anything like that is the roof, in all
          > honesty. I just can't figure out what kind of roof would work well.
          > Tiles are out, I think, as they would be very heavy and labor intensive.
          > This leaves me with either thatching or straight boards or canvas. The
          > last is not a period solution, and I'm not sure if it is a practical one.
          > As for the thatching, I just don't know how labor intensive that would be
          > (wouldn't need it to do more than cover the roof).
          >

          Well, you know, they *did* have plank roofs. Look at all those pictures of
          Edo and other cities with roofs of wood slats with boards laid across them
          and rocks placed thereon to keep them from blowing up in a high wind.
          Undoubtedly Kamo no Chômei's "Ten-foot hut" had such a roof.


          Effingham
        • Ron Martino
          ... Depends on where you put it. The Serengeti is pretty level. As an alternative, you could bring a whole pile of shims - Have an open-topped frame
          Message 4 of 17 , Jan 16, 2002
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            > How will you raise it off the ground and keep it stable? That's the thing
            > that's been bugging me...

            > Effingham

            Depends on where you put it. The Serengeti is pretty level. As an
            alternative, you could bring a whole pile of shims - Have an open-topped
            frame (essentially four sides and no top or bottom), and use the shims
            to level it from the inside. Use lots for stability. That puts most of
            the excess inside, out of sight. There cover with a floor and go from
            there.

            Yumitori
            --

            yumitori(AT)montana(DOT)com
          • Anthony J. Bryant
            ... Actually, the problem is raising a large enough platform off the ground two feet. It will have to have supports or struts frequently enough placed to make
            Message 5 of 17 , Jan 16, 2002
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              Ron Martino wrote:

              > > How will you raise it off the ground and keep it stable? That's the thing
              > > that's been bugging me...
              >
              > > Effingham
              >
              > Depends on where you put it. The Serengeti is pretty level. As an
              > alternative, you could bring a whole pile of shims - Have an open-topped
              > frame (essentially four sides and no top or bottom), and use the shims
              > to level it from the inside. Use lots for stability. That puts most of
              > the excess inside, out of sight. There cover with a floor and go from
              > there.

              Actually, the problem is raising a large enough platform off the ground two
              feet. It will have to have supports or struts frequently enough placed to make
              it both structurally and situationally stable. That calls for lots of material
              of *some* sort -- a major hassle for a temporary structure.

              Effingham
            • Grim Shieldsson
              Bottle Jacks, mounted on plywood ( thick plywood ) with the nice small round lifty part attchd to plywood as well. One at each corner, should do the trick
              Message 6 of 17 , Jan 16, 2002
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                Bottle Jacks, mounted on plywood ( thick plywood ) with the nice small
                round lifty part attchd to plywood as well.
                One at each corner, should do the trick depending on how big the thing
                is. If that won't work, then putting bottle jacks in the center would
                work if you had really long handles to move them up down.

                Alternatively, look at some of the bumper jacks, and modify ( maybe
                heavily, probably use some sort of pin to hold it up )the idea to work
                on the inside ( easier to conceal that way is the only reason for them
                to be on the inside.) If you can conviently conceal these working like
                normal bumper jacks, then you could might be able to mount the main
                support beams directly to the jacks. This would also allow you to have
                one jack per support beam, thus a better distribution of weight,
                reducing the posibbility of having the entire thing sink into the
                swamp. (Although, should that happen you might be able to build another
                one top of that.. and then that would sink.. and you could build one
                on top of that. Course that could lead to some trouble if you tried to
                marry your son off and he didn't want to get married... hmmmm....
                well.. maybe it's not such a good idea... wereguild on the dead fater
                of the bride might be a bit steep.)


                --- "Anthony J. Bryant" <ajbryant@...> wrote:
                > Ii Saburou wrote:
                >
                > > As I learn more and more about Japanese woodworking, I become more
                > > confident that I can at least put together a basic framework for a
                > small,
                > > 4.5 tatami 'pavillion'* that I could take down and put up, but I
                > doubt I
                > > will have something ready for this Pennsic (for one thing, I'm not
                > > familiar enough with the ground, and it was recommended that I
                > check that
                > > out first.) Nonetheless, I may try to swing a basic platform that
                > is
                > > about 2 feet off the ground, then I could cordon it off with
                > something and
                > > put whatever tent I have on that, and at least keep dry...but I
                > digress.
                > >
                >
                > How will you raise it off the ground and keep it stable? That's the
                > thing
                > that's been bugging me...
                >
                > >
                > > My biggest concern for trying anything like that is the roof, in
                > all
                > > honesty. I just can't figure out what kind of roof would work
                > well.
                > > Tiles are out, I think, as they would be very heavy and labor
                > intensive.
                > > This leaves me with either thatching or straight boards or canvas.
                > The
                > > last is not a period solution, and I'm not sure if it is a
                > practical one.
                > > As for the thatching, I just don't know how labor intensive that
                > would be
                > > (wouldn't need it to do more than cover the roof).
                > >
                >
                > Well, you know, they *did* have plank roofs. Look at all those
                > pictures of
                > Edo and other cities with roofs of wood slats with boards laid across
                > them
                > and rocks placed thereon to keep them from blowing up in a high wind.
                > Undoubtedly Kamo no Ch�mei's "Ten-foot hut" had such a roof.
                >
                >
                > Effingham
                >
                >


                =====
                Grim Shieldsson (James A Barrows)
                Acting Chieftain of Clan StormWolf
                Barbarian Freehold Alliance
                Oppurtunity doesn't knock. It only presents itself after you kick down the door.
                --Kyle Chandler

                __________________________________________________
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              • Ron Martino
                ... True, but we re discussing someone doing this at Pennsic, neh? This is a small project considering that... Yumitori -- yumitori(AT)montana(DOT)com
                Message 7 of 17 , Jan 16, 2002
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                  > Actually, the problem is raising a large enough platform off the ground two
                  > feet. It will have to have supports or struts frequently enough placed to make
                  > it both structurally and situationally stable. That calls for lots of material
                  > of *some* sort -- a major hassle for a temporary structure.
                  >
                  > Effingham

                  True, but we're discussing someone doing this at Pennsic, neh? This is
                  a small project considering that...

                  Yumitori
                  --

                  yumitori(AT)montana(DOT)com
                • Ii Saburou
                  ... This is true. I m using the dimensions I find in the Japanese woodworking book, for the most part. Yes, this will be a lot of wood, if I can do it, and
                  Message 8 of 17 , Jan 16, 2002
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                    On Wed, 16 Jan 2002, Anthony J. Bryant wrote:

                    > Actually, the problem is raising a large enough platform off the ground two
                    > feet. It will have to have supports or struts frequently enough placed to make
                    > it both structurally and situationally stable. That calls for lots of material
                    > of *some* sort -- a major hassle for a temporary structure.

                    This is true. I'm using the dimensions I find in the 'Japanese
                    woodworking' book, for the most part. Yes, this will be a lot of wood, if
                    I can do it, and require a full day to set up, I'm sure. When I can do it
                    (being positive) I will probably bring a second tent just in case I need
                    it for the first night or so.

                    That's why I might try just building a platform, at first. If I keep the
                    dimensions right then I can change it into a larger piece later.

                    As for wood, so far it looks like it is breaking down to lots and lots and
                    lots. If it is too big, then I'll just have to figure out something else
                    to do with it (turn it into a small viewing pavillion when I get some land
                    of my own, or something like that). Still, I'm trying to be positive.

                    -Ii
                  • Sojobo@ninjahome.zzn.com
                    be carefull how tall you make it there geting picky about that kind of thing at war. Get your Free E-mail at http://ninjahome.zzn.com
                    Message 9 of 17 , Jan 17, 2002
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                      be carefull how tall you make it there geting
                      picky about that kind of thing at war.



                      Get your Free E-mail at http://ninjahome.zzn.com
                      ____________________________________________________________
                      Get your own Web-Based E-mail Service at http://www.zzn.com

                    • Markejag@aol.com
                      ... This might be to technical, but the posts and the asikatame beam (sills) are held together with the hikidoko joint (overlapping gooseneck lap joints which
                      Message 10 of 17 , Jan 17, 2002
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                        Conversation:

                        > > How will you raise it off the ground and keep it stable? That's the thing
                        > > that's been bugging me...
                        >
                        > > Effingham
                        >
                        >         Depends on where you put it. The Serengeti is pretty level. As an
                        > alternative, you could bring a whole pile of shims - Have an open-topped
                        > frame (essentially four sides and no top or bottom), and use the shims
                        > to level it from the inside. Use lots for stability. That puts most of
                        > the excess inside, out of sight. There cover with a floor and go from
                        > there.

                        Actually, the problem is raising a large enough platform off the ground two
                        feet. It will have to have supports or struts frequently enough placed to make
                        it both structurally and situationally stable. That calls for lots of material
                        of *some* sort -- a major hassle for a temporary structure.

                        Effingham


                        This might be to technical, but the posts and the asikatame beam (sills) are held together with the hikidoko joint (overlapping gooseneck lap joints which pass through the beams).  This joint can be 1/2 to 2 feet above the ground.  Same type of joint used for the corner beams.  The oobiki beams which help support the joist in the middle of the house can be held up with pier supports.  Both post and pier supports are place on rocks to keep them off the ground.  The nice thing about these joints is that they come apart when the keys in the gooseneck laps are removed, the beams just slide out.  When the keys are in place, there is very little movement.  
                        The hardest part, I believe, of a temporary house at the Pennsic war is getting the rocks to be level enough.  If you want to be period about it use a water basin level (or just a regular water bubble level)
                        If you can find them, take a look at the following books:
                        Japanese Joinery, Sato & Nakahara, ISBN: 0-88179-121-0
                        The Art of Japanese Joinery, Kiyosi Seike, ISBN: 0-8348-1516-8
                        The Way of the Carpenter, William Coaldrake, ISBN: 0-8348-0231-7

                        Bun-ami
                      • Anthony J. Bryant
                        ... True. Again, though, my problem with this is portability. If that s not an issue, you can do a castle. What I think might be necessary in the long run
                        Message 11 of 17 , Jan 17, 2002
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                          Markejag@... wrote:

                          >
                          > This might be to technical, but the posts and the asikatame beam
                          > (sills) are held together with the hikidoko joint (overlapping
                          > gooseneck lap joints which pass through the beams). This joint can be
                          > 1/2 to 2 feet above the ground. Same type of joint used for the
                          > corner beams. The oobiki beams which help support the joist in the
                          > middle of the house can be held up with pier supports. Both post and
                          > pier supports are place on rocks to keep them off the ground. The
                          > nice thing about these joints is that they come apart when the keys in
                          > the gooseneck laps are removed, the beams just slide out. When the
                          > keys are in place, there is very little movement.

                          True. Again, though, my problem with this is portability. If that's not
                          an issue, you can do a castle. <G>

                          What I think might be necessary in the long run is a storage facility at
                          or near the Coopers, where this can be stashed from year to year, and
                          assembled for Pennsic. If that could be taken care of, I don't think
                          Ii-dono would have any problem building *anything*; I just keep looking
                          at it as something that travels, and that would mean it would take up a
                          LOT of space if it is to be stable and structurally sound. I could
                          cobble something together that's much more portable, but not nearly as
                          sound a structure; and that wouldn't make me very happy at all, being
                          only half a solution to the problem.

                          >
                          > The hardest part, I believe, of a temporary house at the Pennsic war
                          > is getting the rocks to be level enough. If you want to be period
                          > about it use a water basin level (or just a regular water bubble
                          > level)

                          This is a big concern. People who do solid wall enclosures (like
                          portable houses) have to figure a way around it, too, or they have gaps
                          here and there on the ground (which isn't good in rain <G>) which need
                          to be "back-filled."

                          >
                          > If you can find them, take a look at the following books:
                          > Japanese Joinery, Sato & Nakahara, ISBN: 0-88179-121-0
                          > The Art of Japanese Joinery, Kiyosi Seike, ISBN: 0-8348-1516-8
                          > The Way of the Carpenter, William Coaldrake, ISBN: 0-8348-0231-7

                          I have these last two. Somewhere... They're most excellent books, and
                          worse than a cookbook in the hands of someone living in a dorm. They get
                          me all excited about doing things I have no facilities to do. <G>
                        • Ii Saburou
                          ... I read that the limit is 15 feet. Has that changed? -Ii
                          Message 12 of 17 , Jan 17, 2002
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                            On Thu, 17 Jan 2002 Sojobo@... wrote:

                            > be carefull how tall you make it there geting
                            > picky about that kind of thing at war.

                            I read that the limit is 15 feet. Has that changed?

                            -Ii
                          • Anthony J. Bryant
                            ... I thought 16, but if you shoot for 15 as an outside limit, you should be safe. Effingham
                            Message 13 of 17 , Jan 17, 2002
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                              Ii Saburou wrote:

                              > On Thu, 17 Jan 2002 Sojobo@... wrote:
                              >
                              > > be carefull how tall you make it there geting
                              > > picky about that kind of thing at war.
                              >
                              > I read that the limit is 15 feet. Has that changed?
                              >

                              I thought 16, but if you shoot for 15 as an outside limit, you should be
                              safe.



                              Effingham
                            • Ii Saburou
                              ... This is something that I have really been considering--it is why I think I want to _go_ to Pennsic (or at least the site) before setting it up so that I
                              Message 14 of 17 , Jan 17, 2002
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                                On Thu, 17 Jan 2002 Markejag@... wrote:

                                > Conversation:
                                >
                                > This might be to technical, but the posts and the asikatame beam (sills) are
                                > held together with the hikidoko joint (overlapping gooseneck lap joints which
                                > pass through the beams). This joint can be 1/2 to 2 feet above the ground.
                                > Same type of joint used for the corner beams. The oobiki beams which help
                                > support the joist in the middle of the house can be held up with pier
                                > supports. Both post and pier supports are place on rocks to keep them off
                                > the ground. The nice thing about these joints is that they come apart when
                                > the keys in the gooseneck laps are removed, the beams just slide out. When
                                > the keys are in place, there is very little movement.
                                > The hardest part, I believe, of a temporary house at the Pennsic war is
                                > getting the rocks to be level enough. If you want to be period about it use
                                > a water basin level (or just a regular water bubble level)

                                This is something that I have really been considering--it is why I think I
                                want to _go_ to Pennsic (or at least the site) before setting it up so
                                that I have an idea of the terrain that I'm working with. Nonetheless,
                                the place that I am currently residing is not exactly flat, so I was
                                considering putting it up around here somewhere and seeng how it works.

                                > If you can find them, take a look at the following books:
                                > Japanese Joinery, Sato & Nakahara, ISBN: 0-88179-121-0
                                > The Art of Japanese Joinery, Kiyosi Seike, ISBN: 0-8348-1516-8
                                > The Way of the Carpenter, William Coaldrake, ISBN: 0-8348-0231-7

                                The books I've found are:
                                "The Complete Japanese Joinery" which is apparently two books: "Japanese
                                Woodworking" by Hideo Sato and "Japanese Joinery" by Yasua Nakahara, then
                                both translated by Koichi Paul Nii. (First reference you gave, I think)

                                "The Complete Book of Wood Joinery" by R.J. DeCristoforo, which focuses on
                                modern wood joining mostly on the small scale.

                                -Ii
                              • Ash Smith
                                What kind of square footage are you looking for (of the total deck w/o the rest of the structure on it)? If it s only something like a 10 foot per side square,
                                Message 15 of 17 , Jan 18, 2002
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                                  What kind of square footage are you looking for (of the total deck w/o the
                                  rest of the structure on it)?
                                  If it's only something like a 10 foot per side square, then it would
                                  certainly be possible to support the entire structure with only outside
                                  beams and some clever overlapping. I won't waste time explaining it unless
                                  it's small enough hehehe.

                                  --Ash

                                  "In a warrior's life... one should follow the path of light, but nurture the
                                  darkness within for when it is needed, without allowing it to consume one's
                                  self." -- Ash (me)

                                  ----- Original Message -----
                                  From: Ii Saburou <logan@...>
                                  To: <sca-jml@yahoogroups.com>
                                  Sent: Thursday, January 17, 2002 5:46 PM
                                  Subject: Re: [SCA-JML] Japanese Camping


                                  > On Thu, 17 Jan 2002 Markejag@... wrote:
                                  >
                                  > > Conversation:
                                  > >
                                  > > This might be to technical, but the posts and the asikatame beam (sills)
                                  are
                                  > > held together with the hikidoko joint (overlapping gooseneck lap joints
                                  which
                                  > > pass through the beams). This joint can be 1/2 to 2 feet above the
                                  ground.
                                  > > Same type of joint used for the corner beams. The oobiki beams which
                                  help
                                  > > support the joist in the middle of the house can be held up with pier
                                  > > supports. Both post and pier supports are place on rocks to keep them
                                  off
                                  > > the ground. The nice thing about these joints is that they come apart
                                  when
                                  > > the keys in the gooseneck laps are removed, the beams just slide out.
                                  When
                                  > > the keys are in place, there is very little movement.
                                  > > The hardest part, I believe, of a temporary house at the Pennsic war is
                                  > > getting the rocks to be level enough. If you want to be period about it
                                  use
                                  > > a water basin level (or just a regular water bubble level)
                                  >
                                  > This is something that I have really been considering--it is why I think I
                                  > want to _go_ to Pennsic (or at least the site) before setting it up so
                                  > that I have an idea of the terrain that I'm working with. Nonetheless,
                                  > the place that I am currently residing is not exactly flat, so I was
                                  > considering putting it up around here somewhere and seeng how it works.
                                  >
                                  > > If you can find them, take a look at the following books:
                                  > > Japanese Joinery, Sato & Nakahara, ISBN: 0-88179-121-0
                                  > > The Art of Japanese Joinery, Kiyosi Seike, ISBN: 0-8348-1516-8
                                  > > The Way of the Carpenter, William Coaldrake, ISBN: 0-8348-0231-7
                                  >
                                  > The books I've found are:
                                  > "The Complete Japanese Joinery" which is apparently two books: "Japanese
                                  > Woodworking" by Hideo Sato and "Japanese Joinery" by Yasua Nakahara, then
                                  > both translated by Koichi Paul Nii. (First reference you gave, I think)
                                  >
                                  > "The Complete Book of Wood Joinery" by R.J. DeCristoforo, which focuses on
                                  > modern wood joining mostly on the small scale.
                                  >
                                  > -Ii
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > UNSUBSCRIBE: E-mail sca-jml-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                                  >
                                  > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                • Ii Saburou
                                  ... Well, my original plan called for 15 to a side, although that was including a 3 perimeter veranda, with the actual internal, walled, sleeping area being
                                  Message 16 of 17 , Jan 18, 2002
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                                    On Fri, 18 Jan 2002, Ash Smith wrote:

                                    > What kind of square footage are you looking for (of the total deck w/o the
                                    > rest of the structure on it)?
                                    > If it's only something like a 10 foot per side square, then it would
                                    > certainly be possible to support the entire structure with only outside
                                    > beams and some clever overlapping. I won't waste time explaining it unless
                                    > it's small enough hehehe.
                                    >
                                    Well, my original plan called for 15' to a side, although that was
                                    including a 3' perimeter veranda, with the actual internal, walled,
                                    sleeping area being roughly 9' x 9' (this depends on the exact dimensions
                                    of the tatami mats I could get--I want a 4 1/2 mat room).

                                    I've been thinking about this a lot. I am currently constructing an
                                    approximately 1/2 sized model (I say approximate because a 2"x2" is
                                    actually 1.5"x1.5" which is not half of an actual 4"x4" which is acually
                                    3.5"x3.5", and, well, you get the picture) of a slightly different take.
                                    Because I am using relatively cheap would for this prototype, I envision
                                    having to use screws in many places; I would hope to use as few metal
                                    fasteners as possible for actual construction.

                                    This new idea is an abbreviated version of the first idea. My first idea
                                    (which I still want to pursue, eventually), would have a veranda the
                                    entire girth of the structure, a hipped roof, and a 4 1/2 tatami mat room
                                    with sliding doors on all sides, rather than fixed walls. Amado (rain
                                    doors) would be used to cover the doors in inclement weather.

                                    Now I am looking at a 6' by 9' room (3 tatami mats), with one door on a
                                    short side. This door would open up to a veranda of about three feet by
                                    three feet, partially covered by the gabled roof.

                                    This would be considerably smaller in size (6' x 12' = 72sq' rather than
                                    the 15' x 15' = 225sq' of the first idea). According to lumber weight
                                    tables and total board feet, it seems to come between 2100 and 1200 pounds
                                    of lumber (not including doors and tatami mats; difference comes between
                                    average weight per thousand board feet of pressure treated pine [3200 lbs
                                    per MBFT] vs. untreated cedar [1900 lbs per MBFT] and Pine/Fir [1650 lbs
                                    per MBFT]) This seems to be a doable load for carrying up to Pennsic. I
                                    think that a 15' x 15' structure might be doable, but I don't know if my
                                    truck could pull it, so I would probably rent something larger (which
                                    would cost more money).

                                    Regardless, I still need to look at the site. Are there any other events
                                    that take place up there? Would anyone around here want to make one? I
                                    would really like to drive up there some time in the spring and get a feel
                                    for the land and area before I actually bring anything.

                                    -Ii
                                  • andreahg2000
                                    ... events ... You could try War Practise http://www.dementia.org/~djl/sca/bmdl/events/WP_XIII.html I d love to go, as it s only a 4-5 hr drive for me, but as
                                    Message 17 of 17 , Jan 19, 2002
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                                      >
                                      > Regardless, I still need to look at the site. Are there any other
                                      events
                                      > that take place up there?
                                      > -Ii
                                      You could try War Practise
                                      http://www.dementia.org/~djl/sca/bmdl/events/WP_XIII.html
                                      I'd love to go, as it's only a 4-5 hr drive for me, but as it's less
                                      than one month from my due date, I doubt I'll be allowed to travel
                                      that far.

                                      Nadeshiko
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