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Re: [SCA-JML] question about modern cooking and culture

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  • Ii Saburou
    ... From my experience, I would think that most Japanese tend to eat a smaller main entree than Americans are used to. At the same time, they do seem to
    Message 1 of 2 , Jan 13, 2002
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      On Sun, 13 Jan 2002, andreahg2000 wrote:

      > (which I can believe), they don't cook big and eat or keep leftovers,
      > or they have many dishes at each meal. The one recipe that I have
      > tried from this book was a "country one-dish"type cassarole. It
      > served 4 and called for things like 4shrimp or 4 slices of carrot,
      > 1tablespoon of diced chicken breast, or 2 sliced okra. To me, a
      > one-pot dish means that's all there is to a meal (think of traditional
      > pot roast, where your meat, veggie and starch are all cooked
      > togther). That recipe didn't sound hearty enough to stand alone.
      > Would this normally be served with a few other dishes? How do
      > Japanese people really eat at home?

      From my experience, I would think that most Japanese tend to eat a
      smaller 'main entree' than Americans are used to. At the same time, they
      do seem to often have plenty of little side dishes and TONES of rice (I
      swear, one of my teachers but away 5 or 6 bowls of plain rice at one
      sitting. We were trying to figure out if he had a wooden leg or
      something--and that was on top of the rest of the meal!)

      Meals that I had usually went something along the lines of: main dish,
      soup (usually miso), and lotsa rice. I can think of three notable
      exceptions to this: sukiyaki (which is already soupy and has lots of stuff
      thrown in), oden (for the same reasons as sukiyaki), and when we grilled
      stuff (then it was meat and vegetables, all thrown on a grill).

      Ok... just got out my own Japanese Cook Book. Here they mention 'A simple
      Japanese breakfast consists of rice, soup and a side dish. This is called
      ichihan, ichiju, and issai." It is quite possible your 'one dish' is
      supposed to be 'side dish' (ichi = 1, shortened to 'is' in 'issai')

      Lunch would be something like obento (boxed lunch) or noodles (ramen or
      udon) or rice curry.

      The evening meal should be "ichiju sansai" or "soup and three (side
      dishes)", along with steamed rice, pickles, and hot tea.

      But if it is more of a casserole, then it fits into what is called here,
      also, one-pot dishes. Under the heading of 'serving one-pot dishes' it
      reads "One-pot dishes...are delicious placed over large bolws of steamed
      rice." and "On the side, offer a salad...along with warm sake, hot green
      tea or cold beer. Soft drinks and cold water are always welcomed" It
      ends by suggesting a desert to go along with the 'one-pot dish'

      I hope that helps some.

      -Ii

      Reference:
      "Japanese Cooking for the American Table" by Susan Fuller Slack
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