Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [SCA-JML] Digest Number 607

Expand Messages
  • Emma Kolstad Antunes
    ... Hmm. I guess my taste is colored by my college Japanese (& Zen) professor, who emphasized the splash. That was the first time I d heard the poem. Because
    Message 1 of 1 , Dec 24, 2001
    • 0 Attachment
      > > I don't care for those translations that render the last line as
      >"sound of water" - I'm looking for "splash," which I find closer in
      >spirit to the original.
      >
      >But the original *is* "the sound of water," not "splash" or
      >"kerplop" or "bawoosh." Basho probably could have used the Japanese
      >"hanekashi" (splash) or one of Japan's famous treasure trove of
      >onomatopoeic words, but he didn't -- he said, "the sound of water."

      Hmm. I guess my taste is colored by my college Japanese (& Zen)
      professor, who emphasized the "splash." That was the first time I'd
      heard the poem. Because you're right - "Sound of water" is a
      word-for-word translation, even if I do disagree with the phrasing.
      ("Sound of water?" The sound of the water?" No particles like "the"
      or "a" in Japanese, which add to the feel in English...)

      >You've never seen a book called "One hundred frogs" which is nothing
      >more than a collection of translations of That One Haiku.

      Sounds like it might be fun reading. I was about to go into how I
      think the last line should be translated, but I think the book
      probably covers that in far better detail. :)

      >First, that fits the meter -- five mora.

      Actually, I don't agree that a translation should fit the same
      syllable count as the Japanese. The rhythm is different, since
      there's stress on different syllables, no matter how you do it.
      There's a neat discussion about whether an haiku in English needs to
      be 5-7-5 - what makes a good haiku? See
      http://glwarner.narrowgate.net/haiku/8/viii.html The author talks
      about how he taught haiku to schoolchildren.

      Thanks for the other translation suggestions!

      Happy holidays,
      Emma

      --
      Emma Kolstad Antunes
      http://www.rpg.net/emma
      eantunes@...
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.