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Re: [SCA-JML] Re: tooth blacking again...

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  • Anthony J. Bryant
    ... When speaking of Japanese history, Nara and Heian were classified by the Japanese as ancient (but typically not so by westerners). It s all relative. But
    Message 1 of 8 , Oct 31, 2001
      stephen higa wrote:

      >
      > Effingham wrote:
      > > It's irrelevant. Only the kuge were doing the tooth-blacking in the early
      > > years, and definitely NO ONE was doing it in the Kofun period.
      >
      > Oh; Lady Fujiwara told me this was a quite ancient practice, and that it
      > occurs amongst some Polynesian cultures as well. I was thinking that it was
      > a ritualistic thing (anti-death) that had deep roots in indigenous Japanese
      > religion which at least since the Wei Chih has viewed death as unclean.
      >

      When speaking of Japanese history, Nara and Heian were classified by the
      Japanese as ancient (but typically not so by westerners). It's all relative.
      But there's no evidence for it being done in the protohistoric period and
      certainly I can't recall it being mentioned by the Chinese in the Wajinden.

      >
      > Incidentally, they have unearthed MANY skulls with the front teeth knocked
      > out (i.e., too many to attribute it to natural happenstance); archaeologists
      > have begun to speculate that this was cosmetic or ritualistic or something.
      > Does anybody know about this? However, I'm not about to do that to myself.
      > ;)

      *Where* have they done this? From what period?

      Effingham
    • Stephen Higa
      ... the ... relative. hmm...well, I asked her about my period, and she said it was more ancient than that. Oh well, though, i don t NEED to do it. ;) ...
      Message 2 of 8 , Nov 2, 2001
        --- In sca-jml@y..., "Anthony J. Bryant" <ajbryant@i...> wrote:
        > When speaking of Japanese history, Nara and Heian were classified by
        the
        > Japanese as ancient (but typically not so by westerners). It's all
        relative.

        hmm...well, I asked her about my period, and she said it was more
        ancient than that. Oh well, though, i don't NEED to do it. ;)

        > But there's no evidence for it being done in the protohistoric
        period and
        > certainly I can't recall it being mentioned by the Chinese in the
        Wajinden.

        hmm, that's true. They mention all sorts of other bodily adornments,
        so you'd think they'd especially mention the teeth. Point taken.

        > *Where* have they done this? From what period?

        I don't remember exactly what regions of Japan. They were Jomon and
        perhaps even Yayoi period.
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