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Bonito flakes?

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  • Zach Schneider
    Where does bonito flakes come from? Sardines? I d really like to make some dashi but can t figure out how to aquire or produce the bonito. Thanks for the help,
    Message 1 of 10 , Oct 30, 2001
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      Where does bonito flakes come from? Sardines? I'd really like to make some dashi but can't figure out how to aquire or produce the bonito.
      Thanks for the help,
      Takezo Yoshida
    • Nate Ledbetter
      ... No, Bonito. It s a large fish,which is dried then shaved. Bonito Info HERE(with cool pic):
      Message 2 of 10 , Oct 31, 2001
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        Yoshida-dono:

        --- Zach Schneider <shneider@...> wrote:
        > Where does bonito flakes come from? Sardines?

        No, Bonito. It's a large fish,which is dried then
        shaved. Bonito Info HERE(with cool pic):

        http://school.discovery.com/homeworkhelp/worldbook/atozscience/b/069240.html


        I'd
        > really like to make some dashi but can't figure out
        > how to aquire or produce the bonito.

        You should be able to buy bonito flakes (also called
        hanakatsuo) at your local asian foodmart. If you don't
        have one of those, try either Mitsuwa or Uwajimaya
        online...don't have the URL's on me, sorry. Look for
        katsuodashi, hanakatsuo, or bonito, and you should
        find a hit.

        > Thanks for the help,
        > Takezo Yoshida

        No problemo!

        Shonaigawa


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      • Elaine Koogler
        I may be wrong, but I believe that there is an actualy bonito fish, and bonito flakes are dried bonito. The best place to get this would be at a Japanese or
        Message 3 of 10 , Oct 31, 2001
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          I may be wrong, but I believe that there is an actualy bonito fish, and bonito flakes are dried bonito.  The best place to get this would be at a Japanese or other variety of oriental grocery store where they carry Japanese foodstuffs.

          There are several websites where you can locate the stuff for purchase.  I found the following:  http://www.maruwa.com/onlineshop/dry_food/dry_food.html, where it is listed at 5 3gram pkgs for $2.09.

          Hope this helps!

          Kiri

          Zach Schneider wrote:

          Where does bonito flakes come from? Sardines? I'd really like to make some dashi but can't figure out how to aquire or produce the bonito.Thanks for the help,Takezo Yoshida



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        • Taira no Akiyo
          bonito, dried = katsuobushi = katsuo-bushi Notes: Bonito are related to mackerel, and the Japanese dry them and use them in soups. They re often shaved
          Message 4 of 10 , Oct 31, 2001
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            bonito, dried = katsuobushi = katsuo-bushi Notes: Bonito are
            related to mackerel, and the Japanese dry them and use them in
            soups. They're often shaved into thin flakes called bonito flakes or
            hanakatsuo.

            http://www.foodsubs.com/Fishsmok.html#dried%20bonita%20flakes

            On a side note. I recall my great-grandmother actually shaving her
            own (hana)katsuo every couple of weeks. She would buy the dried
            fish, which didn't look very fish like, and shave it with this little
            wooden box she had with a razor blade secured at an angle on the
            cover. The shavings would be caught in the box and I suppose you
            could describe the box as a one setting mandolin (the cooking kind)
            attached to a box to catch the food stuffs. I don't know if this was
            something that my great-grandfather made for her or if it was
            something they purchased. The box may be somewhere at my
            grandmother's house but we just buy our flakes by the pound at
            Shimaya (a very nice store in Hawaii that sells my favorite type of
            tea by the pound) now. I just remember that it made big beautiful
            pieces rather than the little crumpled ones that one can purchase in
            an Asian grocery.

            Looking forward to New Years at home,
            Akiyo

            --- In sca-jml@y..., "Zach Schneider" <shneider@b...> wrote:
            > Where does bonito flakes come from? Sardines? I'd really like to
            make some dashi but can't figure out how to aquire or produce the
            bonito.
            > Thanks for the help,
            > Takezo Yoshida
          • Anthony J. Bryant
            ... They come from bonito. The fish is cut into fillets then dried to the consistency of hardwood, and then shaved by what looks like a plane. You can buy
            Message 5 of 10 , Oct 31, 2001
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              Zach Schneider wrote:

              > Where does bonito flakes come from? Sardines? I'd really like to make
              > some dashi but can't figure out how to aquire or produce the
              > bonito.Thanks for the help,

              They come from bonito. The fish is cut into fillets then dried to the
              consistency of hardwood, and then shaved by what looks like a plane.

              You can buy either straight bonito flakes or pre-mixed dashi at any
              Oriental food market (it's one of the standard items).


              Effingham
            • Elsyr
              A woodwright s plane, but for fish! How cool. :-) Actually - it sounds a lot like the kind of mandolin my mom once got on a trip to Germany. It was meant
              Message 6 of 10 , Oct 31, 2001
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                A woodwright's plane, but for fish! How cool. :-) Actually - it sounds a
                lot like the kind of mandolin my mom once got on a trip to Germany. It was
                meant for making spatzel, and had only one setting on the blade. You might
                be able to find something like this in a higher end kitchen store or
                catalog. As another side note, if you cannot find the real dried bonito
                flakes in your area, you might try looking for instant dashi at a supermarket
                with a decent ethnic foods department. I remember buying a jar a few years
                back and using it and it was not bad at all, considering that it was
                essentially dashi bouillon. The brand name was something like "Hon Dashi" -
                rather ironic.

                Sakurakawa

                Taira no Akiyo wrote:

                > bonito, dried = katsuobushi = katsuo-bushi Notes: Bonito are
                > related to mackerel, and the Japanese dry them and use them in
                > soups. They're often shaved into thin flakes called bonito flakes or
                > hanakatsuo.
                >
                > http://www.foodsubs.com/Fishsmok.html#dried%20bonita%20flakes
                >
                > On a side note. I recall my great-grandmother actually shaving her
                > own (hana)katsuo every couple of weeks. She would buy the dried
                > fish, which didn't look very fish like, and shave it with this little
                > wooden box she had with a razor blade secured at an angle on the
                > cover. The shavings would be caught in the box and I suppose you
                > could describe the box as a one setting mandolin (the cooking kind)
                > attached to a box to catch the food stuffs. I don't know if this was
                > something that my great-grandfather made for her or if it was
                > something they purchased. The box may be somewhere at my
                > grandmother's house but we just buy our flakes by the pound at
                > Shimaya (a very nice store in Hawaii that sells my favorite type of
                > tea by the pound) now. I just remember that it made big beautiful
                > pieces rather than the little crumpled ones that one can purchase in
                > an Asian grocery.
                >
                > Looking forward to New Years at home,
                > Akiyo
                >
                > --- In sca-jml@y..., "Zach Schneider" <shneider@b...> wrote:
                > > Where does bonito flakes come from? Sardines? I'd really like to
                > make some dashi but can't figure out how to aquire or produce the
                > bonito.
                > > Thanks for the help,
                > > Takezo Yoshida
                >
                >
                > UNSUBSCRIBE: E-mail sca-jml-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                >
                > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
              • Barbara Nostrand
                Noble Cousins! Greetings from Solveig bonito flakes come from the specially processed flesh of a relative of the tuna called the skipjack if I recall the
                Message 7 of 10 , Oct 31, 2001
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                  Noble Cousins!

                  Greetings from Solveig "bonito" flakes come from the specially processed
                  flesh of a relative of the tuna called the skipjack if I recall the
                  common name and affiliation correctly. In Japanese, the name of
                  the fish is katsuo and this name is modified for use in the linean name.
                  You can find a picture and description of this fish at the U.S. commercial
                  fishery web page. These web pages note that bonito does not taste very
                  good. They are referring to an entirely different fish than the mislabeled
                  katsuo which is quite yummy when eaten raw.

                  Regardless, the flesh goes through various cooking and curing processes
                  until it resembles a hunk of wood. The flakes are then produced by planing.
                  Many of the terms used to describe the later stages of processing are
                  derived from carpentry and some of the tools used are essentially carpentry
                  tools. You can either use a special planing box or a number of other
                  utensils to produce the flakes. Once my Chaseki class made its own
                  bonito flakes by using a piece of broken light bulb to plane the
                  woody piece of cured katsuo. I asked my sensei about what would have been
                  used before light bulbs, and she suggested that broken crockery might
                  be used for the purpose. You can of course make dashi from commercially
                  processed bonito flakes which comes in bags at Japanese food stores. You
                  may be able to find hunks of processed Bonito in a few Asian markets in
                  big cities, but I doubt that there is much of a commercial demand for
                  the stuff. It does taste better when freshly flaked, but most people are
                  content with vastly inferior soup. You can use sardines to produce dashi.
                  I have done this many times. However, it is not nearly as yummy as dashi
                  made from katsuo.

                  Regardless. If I recall correctly, "bonito" is actually the following
                  fish:

                  http://vm.cfsan.fda.gov/~frf/rfe0sk.html

                  and not:

                  http://vm.cfsan.fda.gov/~frf/rfe0sb.html

                  So I went and looked it up in Nihon Shokusai Hyakkajiten. On page 172,
                  this book claims that katsuo is called skipjack tuna in English and
                  bonite a ventre raye in French. Fresh katsuo has dark red flesh.

                  Your Humble Servant
                  Solveig Throndardottir
                  Amateur Scholar
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                • despairbear@yahoo.com
                  ... From: Zach Schneider To: sca-jml@yahoogroups.com Sent: Tuesday, October 30, 2001 11:35 PM Subject: [SCA-JML] Bonito flakes? Where does bonito flakes come
                  Message 8 of 10 , Oct 31, 2001
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                    ----- Original Message -----
                    Sent: Tuesday, October 30, 2001 11:35 PM
                    Subject: [SCA-JML] Bonito flakes?

                    Where does bonito flakes come from? Sardines? I'd really like to make some dashi but can't figure out how to aquire or produce the bonito.
                    Thanks for the help,
                    Takezo Yoshida
                     
                    Greetings, I believe that it comes from tuna. Dried chipped tuna. You should be able to get it at your grocery store (I get mine from Ralphs, Albertsons, Vons) or at any Asian food store.
                     
                     
                    Godric Of Castlemont
                     
                  • spook23.geo@yahoo.com
                    this should be a picture of a man holding a bonito http://www.fishbustercharters.com/bonito.htm ... make some dashi but can t figure out how to aquire or
                    Message 9 of 10 , Dec 1, 2001
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                      this should be a picture of a man holding a bonito

                      http://www.fishbustercharters.com/bonito.htm


                      --- In sca-jml@y..., "Zach Schneider" <shneider@b...> wrote:
                      > Where does bonito flakes come from? Sardines? I'd really like to
                      make some dashi but can't figure out how to aquire or produce the
                      bonito.
                      > Thanks for the help,
                      > Takezo Yoshida
                    • spook23.geo@yahoo.com
                      this should be a picture of a man holding a bonito http://www.fishbustercharters.com/bonito.htm ... make some dashi but can t figure out how to aquire or
                      Message 10 of 10 , Dec 1, 2001
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                        this should be a picture of a man holding a bonito

                        http://www.fishbustercharters.com/bonito.htm


                        --- In sca-jml@y..., "Zach Schneider" <shneider@b...> wrote:
                        > Where does bonito flakes come from? Sardines? I'd really like to
                        make some dashi but can't figure out how to aquire or produce the
                        bonito.
                        > Thanks for the help,
                        > Takezo Yoshida
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