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Re: [SCA-JML] Introduction: totally new to all of this

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  • Anthony J. Bryant
    ... Minor point (today), major point in Japanese: calling someone by his name without an honorific is considered rude and borders on insult. Just an FYI .
    Message 1 of 43 , Oct 1, 2001
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      Jedillore wrote:

      > I am somewhat late in replying. Gomen nasai.*
      >
      > on 9/20/01 6:53 PM, Ii Saburou at logan@... wrote:
      >
      > > Konnichiwa. Sessha Ii to mosu mono. Yoroshiku tanomi moshi agemasuru!*
      >
      > Hajimemashite Ii. Okagesama de.**
      >

      Minor point (today), major point in Japanese: calling someone by his name
      without an honorific is considered rude and borders on insult. Just an "FYI"
      <G>.

      The generic "safe" honorific is "-dono" so "Ii-dono" is better than "Ii." (or,
      to push a pun, "Ii-dono to wa ii yori ii.")

      Also, "okagesama de" is the response to "how are you," not "pleased to meet
      you." -- But you'll pick up the Japanese bits more and more as we play. <G>

      > I think I may have dated Seven Samurai wrong. I thought it was Edo and that
      > Edo fell outside the time period focused on by the SCA. It must be set
      > earlier than I thought.
      >

      There's a clear date given in the film, but a lot of people fail to pick up on
      it. Mifune's character, "Kikuchiyo," is -- according to his stolen family
      registry -- 13 years of age (12 years in western reckoning) as he was born in
      Tensho 2 (1574). Adding 12 to that, we get 1586.

      > Wow that's tall. I actually had a question about that. I'm about 5'4", 100
      > pounds, hair down to my waist. Perfect for a Japanese lady if a little tall
      > for the period, but uh-oh I'm blonde/blue eyed. Should I wear a dark wig?
      > Or just be a Caucasian in kimono?
      >

      No, but you should call me to.... um... well, you should jsut call me. <G>

      > As it should be. I am the same way. I will always be a beginner, as long
      > as there is more to learn. (which there always is :-)
      >

      I think we can *all* relate to that one... <G>

      > Question about the nagabakama - it looks to me like the women actually
      > walked on the trailing ends of the pants (rather than letting them pile up
      > around their ankles). Is that the case? I've been trying to figure this
      > out.
      >

      Depends on the period as to what they wore and how they walked -- but if it was
      nagabakama, then they walked on them, yes.

      >
      > So that would make me Yamamoto no Akimi? Or simply Yamamoto Akimi? Also,
      > in Baron Effingham's Japanese Miscellany he describes a noble daughter
      > (O-matsu) being called "matsu-hime" rather than by her father's family name.
      > Would that then make it "Akimi-hime"? Or would Yamamoto-hime still be
      > appropriate?
      >

      Well, if you have an AoA you can use "-hime" -- but it's used with given names,
      not surnames. Since "-hime" is only appropriate for younger women anyway, we
      can "get away" with using given names for 'em. <G>



      Effingham
    • Jedillore
      ... Period? I don t think I m quite ready for that. But... Kochira koso. Hai. Wakarimasu. This does mean however, that I ve made this mistake before.
      Message 43 of 43 , Oct 2, 2001
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        on 10/2/01 4:48 PM, Anthony J. Bryant at ajbryant@... wrote:

        >
        >>> Also, "okagesama de" is the response to "how are you," not "pleased to meet
        >>> you." -- But you'll pick up the Japanese bits more and more as we play. <G>
        >>>
        >>
        >> What would have been the proper response? Dozo yoroshiku?
        >
        > Yes, in fact, or perhaps "kochira koso" (hard to translate; if we translate
        > "Yoroshiku onegai shimasu" as "pleased to meet you", "kochira koso" is the
        > equivalent of "the pleasure's all mine").
        >
        > Now, if you want to switch to period Japanese.... <G>
        >

        Period? I don't think I'm quite ready for that.
        But... "Kochira koso." Hai. Wakarimasu.

        This does mean however, that I've made this mistake before. Like I said, I
        was trying to be super polite to Ii-dono. It would follow then that I've
        most likely made the same gaff greeting various sensei. <wince> They
        probably thought it was quaint...

        >
        > You should see my calendar page in the Miscellany <G>.
        > http://www.geocities.com/sengokudaimyo .
        >

        Your site is amazing. I've been slowly sifting through it and digesting it.
        I just haven't gotten to the calendar part yet. (Probably because I'm still
        trying to figure out how people's names worked! :-)

        >
        > Flirting? Ummm... not as... um....
        >
        > Did you see "Fletch"?
        >
        > Juvenile delinquent: "Are you a cop?"
        > Fletch: "As far as you know."
        >

        I didn't see Fletch, but I'm in a terribly good mood and got a huge laugh
        out of that quote. I shall have to see it. I think it will be the first
        movie in English I've seen in like a year...


        >
        > Actually, it's rather easy. You get used to it. Of course, smooth wooden
        > floors
        > help...
        >

        Say - perhaps my kendo ashi-sabaki will actually be useful for something
        besides kendo. We slide around on smooth wooden floors all the time.

        >
        > Actually, no... <G> If you don't *know* an AoA, you probably don't have one.
        > <G>

        You'd be absolutely right about that. :-)

        >
        > They'd probably use your surname plus "-dono."

        Ah. Okay. Too bad really. I was quite taken with the idea of being called
        "princess" even though I'm not one. I will have to earn it I suppose.

        As always, thanks for the info.

        -akime-
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