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  • Jedillore
    Onegasu shimasu - Okay, now that I know that Yamamoto is a proper name (yes, base of the mountain is perfect), how is Akimi as a given name? Making it
    Message 1 of 6 , Sep 27, 2001
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      Onegasu shimasu -

      Okay, now that I know that Yamamoto is a proper name (yes, base of the
      mountain is perfect), how is Akimi as a given name? Making it Yamamoto
      Akimi. The imagery is beautiful and very close to my heart so I really like
      it.

      Is that proper for Heian period or should I go back to the drawing board
      again.

      Domo arigato,
      Emily.
    • Barbara Nostrand
      Noble Cousin! Greetings from Solveig! Akime is easier than Akimi for early Heian. The -me naming pattern gets formed using any of about three different kanji
      Message 2 of 6 , Sep 27, 2001
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        Noble Cousin!

        Greetings from Solveig! Akime is easier than Akimi for early Heian.
        The -me naming pattern gets formed using any of about three different
        kanji depending partly upon the exact timeframe. The nameing pattern
        has its roots in the Nara period. Basically, -me is used as a
        deuterotheme to form feminine names during the Nara and early Heian
        periods.

        Your Humble Servant
        Solveig Throndardottir
        Amateur Scholar
        --
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        | Barbara Nostrand, Ph.D. | Solveig Throndardottir, CoM |
        | deMoivre Institute | Carolingia Statis Mentis Est |
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      • Jedillore
        ... Yamamoto Akime ... Hmmmm.... Yes! I like it very much. I am grateful for your assistance. _bows deeply_ Domo Arigato Gozaimashite. Dewa mata*, Akime
        Message 3 of 6 , Sep 28, 2001
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          on 9/27/01 11:23 PM, Barbara Nostrand at nostrand@... wrote:

          > Noble Cousin!
          >
          > Greetings from Solveig! Akime is easier than Akimi for early Heian.
          > The -me naming pattern gets formed using any of about three different
          > kanji depending partly upon the exact timeframe. The nameing pattern
          > has its roots in the Nara period. Basically, -me is used as a
          > deuterotheme to form feminine names during the Nara and early Heian
          > periods.
          >
          > Your Humble Servant
          > Solveig Throndardottir
          > Amateur Scholar


          Yamamoto Akime ... Hmmmm....

          Yes! I like it very much. I am grateful for your assistance.

          _bows deeply_ Domo Arigato Gozaimashite.

          Dewa mata*,
          Akime

          (trying it on for size)


          *Question/request:
          Is "Dewa mata" an appropriate way to close an email? I thought of using
          Itte mairimasu (So long), but I'm not sure it that one only works when
          you're actually physically leaving a place. Sometimes the literal
          translation doesn't necessarily mean it would work in the same context as it
          would in English. I love the phrase "shitsurei shimasu" which is used to
          say goodbye but translates to "I'll be rude" as an example of the importance
          of context.
        • Anthony J. Bryant
          ... I can t see why not. I ve been known, in more flippant moments, to close mata, ne! Rules for correspondence are always different from those for actual
          Message 4 of 6 , Sep 28, 2001
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            Jedillore wrote:

            > on 9/27/01 11:23 PM, Barbara Nostrand at nostrand@... wrote:
            >
            > > Noble Cousin!
            > >
            > > Greetings from Solveig! Akime is easier than Akimi for early Heian.
            > > The -me naming pattern gets formed using any of about three different
            > > kanji depending partly upon the exact timeframe. The nameing pattern
            > > has its roots in the Nara period. Basically, -me is used as a
            > > deuterotheme to form feminine names during the Nara and early Heian
            > > periods.
            > >
            > > Your Humble Servant
            > > Solveig Throndardottir
            > > Amateur Scholar
            >
            > Yamamoto Akime ... Hmmmm....
            >
            > Yes! I like it very much. I am grateful for your assistance.
            >
            > _bows deeply_ Domo Arigato Gozaimashite.
            >
            > Dewa mata*,
            > Akime
            >
            > (trying it on for size)
            >
            > *Question/request:
            > Is "Dewa mata" an appropriate way to close an email?

            I can't see why not. I've been known, in more flippant moments, to close "mata,
            ne!"

            Rules for correspondence are always different from those for actual real
            meat-time conversation, so...

            > I thought of using
            > Itte mairimasu (So long), but I'm not sure it that one only works when
            > you're actually physically leaving a place.

            Indeed. That only works when you're taking your physical leave and plan on
            returning.

            > Sometimes the literal
            > translation doesn't necessarily mean it would work in the same context as it
            > would in English. I love the phrase "shitsurei shimasu" which is used to
            > say goodbye but translates to "I'll be rude" as an example of the importance
            > of context.

            Again: indeed! (I'm feeling quite agreeable today. Must be a Friday thing. <G>)

            Maybe next Pennsic I should teach a class in classical Japanese epistolary
            style (greetings, closings, whatnot).



            Mata, ne! <G>

            Effingham
          • Barbara Nostrand
            Baron Edward! Greetings from Solveig! I should mention that I have an entire book just on how to write Japanese letters writing around here someplace. (I saw
            Message 5 of 6 , Sep 28, 2001
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              Baron Edward!

              Greetings from Solveig! I should mention that I have an entire book just
              on how to write Japanese letters writing around here someplace. (I saw
              it recently. Honest.) I suggest limiting the talk a bit so that it will
              fit in an hour.

              Your Humble Servant
              Solveig Throndardottir
              Amateur Scholar
              --
              +---------------------------------------------------------------------+
              | Barbara Nostrand, Ph.D. | Solveig Throndardottir, CoM |
              | deMoivre Institute | Carolingia Statis Mentis Est |
              | mailto:nostrand@... | mailto:bnostran@... |
              +---------------------------------------------------------------------+
              | Ignored domains: bestbiz.net, pop.net, hotmail.com, aibusiness.com |
              | vdi.net, usa.net, tpnet.pl, myremarq.com |
              | netscape.net, excite.com, bigfoot.com, public.com |
              | com.tw, eranet.net, yahoo.com, success.net |
              | mailcity.com, net.tw, twac.com, netcenter.com |
              | techie.com, msn.com |
              +---------------------------------------------------------------------+
            • Anthony J. Bryant
              ... I think most people who ve studied Japanese have one somewhere. I have several myself, but I m a pathetic case. Heck, I even have a book of wedding
              Message 6 of 6 , Oct 1, 2001
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                Barbara Nostrand wrote:

                > Baron Edward!
                >
                > Greetings from Solveig! I should mention that I have an entire book just
                > on how to write Japanese letters writing around here someplace. (I saw
                > it recently. Honest.) I suggest limiting the talk a bit so that it will
                > fit in an hour.

                I think most people who've studied Japanese have one somewhere. I have
                several myself, but I'm a pathetic case. Heck, I even have a book of wedding
                speeches. Sad, huh? <g>

                I'm talking about historical epistolary style, though, not modern business
                letters.

                BTW, think I gave you a copy of Fra Joao Rodriguez' 16th century treatise
                on epistolary Japanese, no?


                Effingham
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