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Question on "Kazami"

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  • Joyce Brown
    greetings, I was wondering if someone could help me figure out what a yudachi is. I found this costume I m interested in but can t quite figure out from the
    Message 1 of 15 , Sep 14, 2001
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      greetings,

      I was wondering if someone could help me figure out
      what a yudachi is. I found this costume I'm
      interested in but can't quite figure out from the
      picture what a yudachi is. also some help with more
      detail on the kazami would be greatly appreciated.


      http://www.iz2.or.jp/english/fukusyoku/wayou/index.htm

      thank you in advance
      in service
      viola carara


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    • Joyce Brown
      ... for give me for sending this again, but I am still very new at these computer things. I m afraid the address I gave brings up the whole list instead of the
      Message 2 of 15 , Sep 14, 2001
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        > greetings,

        for give me for sending this again, but I am still
        very new at these computer things.

        I'm afraid the address I gave brings up the whole
        list instead of the single photo--- the costume I
        refer to is the second one on the list --young girl in
        everyday wear, called "kazami" --- I'm afraid I do not
        know how to bring up just the one photo.
        >
        > I was wondering if someone could help me figure out
        > what a yudachi is. I found this costume I'm
        > interested in but can't quite figure out from the
        > picture what a yudachi is. also some help with
        > more
        > detail on the kazami would be greatly appreciated.
        >
        >
        >
        http://www.iz2.or.jp/english/fukusyoku/wayou/index.htm
        >
        > thank you in advance (again)
        > in service
        > viola carara
        >
        >
        > __________________________________________________
        > Terrorist Attacks on U.S. - How can you help?
        > Donate cash, emergency relief information
        >
        http://dailynews.yahoo.com/fc/US/Emergency_Information/
        >


        __________________________________________________
        Terrorist Attacks on U.S. - How can you help?
        Donate cash, emergency relief information
        http://dailynews.yahoo.com/fc/US/Emergency_Information/
      • Ii Saburou
        ... That s alright, I think I know what you are talking about. Looking at it, I would tend to think that it is talking about the string at the shoulders. What
        Message 3 of 15 , Sep 14, 2001
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          On Fri, 14 Sep 2001, Joyce Brown wrote:

          > > greetings,
          >
          > for give me for sending this again, but I am still
          > very new at these computer things.
          >
          > I'm afraid the address I gave brings up the whole
          > list instead of the single photo--- the costume I
          > refer to is the second one on the list --young girl in
          > everyday wear, called "kazami" --- I'm afraid I do not
          > know how to bring up just the one photo.

          That's alright, I think I know what you are talking about.

          Looking at it, I would tend to think that it is talking about the string
          at the shoulders. What I'm having trouble distinguishing is whether that
          cord is tied at the shoulders or part of the item the young lady is
          carrying in her hands. Perhaps someone else will know, but it looks like
          a string on the top of the sleeves--not sure if there would be one or two.

          -Ii
        • Barbara Nostrand
          Noble Cousin! Greetings from Solveig! A kazami is a light outer robe made out of silk which could be of either straight or twill weave worn by young women.
          Message 4 of 15 , Sep 15, 2001
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            Noble Cousin!

            Greetings from Solveig! A kazami is a light outer robe made out
            of silk which could be of either straight or twill weave worn by
            young women.

            What is the context for yudachi?

            Your Humble Servant
            Solveig Throndardottir
            Amateur Scholar
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          • Ii Saburou
            ... The web page that was pointed to had a diagram of the garments. What appears to have been a himo at the shoulder (it was white on a white background, so
            Message 5 of 15 , Sep 16, 2001
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              On Sun, 16 Sep 2001, Barbara Nostrand wrote:

              > What is the context for yudachi?

              The web page that was pointed to had a diagram of the garments. What
              appears to have been a himo at the shoulder (it was white on a white
              background, so hard to see in the actual picture) is pointed out in the
              diagram as a 'yudachi' with no kanji given on the Japanese version of the
              page.

              If you check out the link she pointed to (second link down the side) I
              think you will understand what she is asking here.

              -Ii
            • Anthony J. Bryant
              ... I don t know if this has been answered, but in inclement weather a straw cape called a mino is worn to shed rain or snow. It s not particularly warm,
              Message 6 of 15 , Sep 26, 2001
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                cameronslayden@... wrote:

                > Hello,
                >
                > does anybody have any suggestion for cold-weather garb worn with yoroi?
                > for example, what would a samurai wear on a long campaign to keep warm
                > in the field?
                >

                I don't know if this has been answered, but in inclement weather a straw
                cape called a mino is worn to shed rain or snow. It's not particularly warm,
                though. You would have to layer or perhaps line garments. That's what they
                did; and they didn't relish fighting in winter, either. <G>

                Effingham
              • Anthony J. Bryant
                ... Yudachi is a kind of cord tying the sleeve to the body of the garment. I believe the term is also what was used to refer to the complexly-interknotted
                Message 7 of 15 , Sep 26, 2001
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                  Joyce Brown wrote:

                  > greetings,
                  >
                  > I was wondering if someone could help me figure out
                  > what a yudachi is. I found this costume I'm
                  > interested in but can't quite figure out from the
                  > picture what a yudachi is. also some help with more
                  > detail on the kazami would be greatly appreciated.
                  >

                  Yudachi is a kind of cord tying the sleeve to the body of the garment. I
                  believe the term is also what was used to refer to the
                  complexly-interknotted cords that attached the separated sleeves of some
                  late-period dofuku to the body of the garment as well.


                  Effingham
                • Elaine Koogler
                  Pardon my presumption, Master Edward, but didn t they often quit their kimono, etc.? I have read in several places that the Japanese were among the first to
                  Message 8 of 15 , Sep 27, 2001
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                    Pardon my presumption, Master Edward, but didn't they often quit their kimono,
                    etc.? I have read in several places that the Japanese were among the first to
                    quilt their clothing.

                    Kiri

                    "Anthony J. Bryant" wrote:

                    > cameronslayden@... wrote:
                    >
                    > > Hello,
                    > >
                    > > does anybody have any suggestion for cold-weather garb worn with yoroi?
                    > > for example, what would a samurai wear on a long campaign to keep warm
                    > > in the field?
                    > >
                    >
                    > I don't know if this has been answered, but in inclement weather a straw
                    > cape called a mino is worn to shed rain or snow. It's not particularly warm,
                    > though. You would have to layer or perhaps line garments. That's what they
                    > did; and they didn't relish fighting in winter, either. <G>
                    >
                    > Effingham
                    >
                    >
                    > UNSUBSCRIBE: E-mail sca-jml-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                    >
                    > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                  • Anthony J. Bryant
                    ... Hiya!!! I don t think they quilted clothing to wear, not commonly in Period at any rate. They did pad some of the clothing, and did make kimono-shaped
                    Message 9 of 15 , Sep 27, 2001
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                      Elaine Koogler wrote:

                      > Pardon my presumption, Master Edward, but didn't they often quit their kimono,
                      > etc.? I have read in several places that the Japanese were among the first to
                      > quilt their clothing.

                      Hiya!!!

                      I don't think they quilted clothing to wear, not commonly in Period at any rate.

                      They did pad some of the clothing, and did make kimono-shaped quilts (think of a
                      kimono made out of a comforter). Today, you can still buy these to sleep *under*
                      (not in); I don't doubt, though, that in period in the cold at night people might
                      slip into this thing. In some historical films and so on, you can see people in
                      winter wearing what looks like a quilted (i.e., a rather fully padded) kimono as
                      a robe, but this is worn at home and inside. I can't recall seeing people outside
                      wearing them.

                      <shrug> Maybe they were just more rugged than we are... <G>

                      Effingham
                    • Elaine Koogler
                      I guess I may have misspoken...I did mean padded...not quilted, as we think of it. Although...again I have read in one of my books on costuming, that the
                      Message 10 of 15 , Sep 28, 2001
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                        I guess I may have misspoken...I did mean padded...not quilted, as we think of it.
                        Although...again I have read in one of my books on costuming, that the Japanese were
                        among one of the first cultures to do the piecework/patchwork as is seen in modern
                        western quilt tops!

                        Kiri

                        "Anthony J. Bryant" wrote:

                        > Elaine Koogler wrote:
                        >
                        > > Pardon my presumption, Master Edward, but didn't they often quit their kimono,
                        > > etc.? I have read in several places that the Japanese were among the first to
                        > > quilt their clothing.
                        >
                        > Hiya!!!
                        >
                        > I don't think they quilted clothing to wear, not commonly in Period at any rate.
                        >
                        > They did pad some of the clothing, and did make kimono-shaped quilts (think of a
                        > kimono made out of a comforter). Today, you can still buy these to sleep *under*
                        > (not in); I don't doubt, though, that in period in the cold at night people might
                        > slip into this thing. In some historical films and so on, you can see people in
                        > winter wearing what looks like a quilted (i.e., a rather fully padded) kimono as
                        > a robe, but this is worn at home and inside. I can't recall seeing people outside
                        > wearing them.
                        >
                        > <shrug> Maybe they were just more rugged than we are... <G>
                        >
                        > Effingham
                        >
                        >
                        > UNSUBSCRIBE: E-mail sca-jml-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                        >
                        > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                      • mneumark@hotmail.com
                        ... their kimono, ... the first to ... Quilting...I have a book on Sashiko that mentions sashiko was used originally on firemen s clothing in a quilting like
                        Message 11 of 15 , Sep 28, 2001
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                          --- In sca-jml@y..., Elaine Koogler <ekoogler@c...> wrote:
                          > Pardon my presumption, Master Edward, but didn't they often quit
                          their kimono,
                          > etc.? I have read in several places that the Japanese were among
                          the first to
                          > quilt their clothing.
                          >
                          > Kiri

                          Quilting...I have a book on Sashiko that mentions sashiko was used
                          originally on firemen's clothing in a quilting like manner.
                          SUPPOSEDLY that is period, but sashiko itself isn't period. So,
                          thinking about this line of thought, then the Japanese probably
                          didn't quilt.

                          I'm hoping that someone can confirm if I am correct or not. I'm
                          actually starting to research Japanese quilting, and would REALLY
                          love help on this stuff.

                          --Raku
                        • mneumark@hotmail.com
                          ... we think of it. ... the Japanese were ... seen in modern ... You know, I was on Steffan s Florgium looking over quilt stuff, and I think that europe was
                          Message 12 of 15 , Sep 28, 2001
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                            --- In sca-jml@y..., Elaine Koogler <ekoogler@c...> wrote:
                            > I guess I may have misspoken...I did mean padded...not quilted, as
                            we think of it.
                            > Although...again I have read in one of my books on costuming, that
                            the Japanese were
                            > among one of the first cultures to do the piecework/patchwork as is
                            seen in modern
                            > western quilt tops!
                            >

                            You know, I was on Steffan's Florgium looking over quilt stuff, and I
                            think that europe was first with "crazy quilts". It said in there
                            that crazy quilts were period, but I've NEVER seen any books or
                            anything else ever referrence quilting was period either. Of course,
                            I only started to look at the stuff and not all that deeply (yet).

                            I have a book called "Omiyage" (I think) which is patchwork like
                            little bags. It's mentioned that in period, the peasant class used
                            to make little bags (the size of marble bags) and give them as gifts
                            to their shogun/royality. I'm not sure if this is the case or not
                            (Edward?) but the book is SO cool and has little bags that are in the
                            shape of flowers, birds, fish and all sorts of other sewing
                            projects. I'm thinking of making some anyhow for gifts. What the
                            heq, huh? If they were period, it would be a PLUS for sure.

                            Sashiko, (yeah, I like sashiko) isn't period, but blackwork IS, and I
                            guess they both use the same sort of stitches. It's very frustrating
                            to me that sashiko isn't period...I was hoping to make a sashiko
                            table setting with a traditional ceramic tea set for Caid's
                            Pentathlon in two years, but it isn't period. WAH!!!!

                            --Raku
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