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Re: yojimbo

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  • roningold@yahoo.com
    I would recomend Bushi as the correct term to use. It was the most common reference to a man-at-arms that had no status as a samurai or samurai s retainer.
    Message 1 of 8 , Sep 8, 2001
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      I would recomend 'Bushi' as the correct term to use. It was the most
      common reference to a 'man-at-arms' that had no status as a samurai
      or samurai's retainer.

      Still dreaming,
      Taro O'bake (sake-man..)
      Goldenrod of Adtenvelt




      --- In sca-jml@y..., mgiard@h... wrote:
      > Konnichi Wah Nippon-knowledgefull-fellows!
      >
      > I would like to know if the term "yojimbo" is period (SCA) I'm
      > searching for a nippon version of the "men at arms" pseudo-
      unofficial-
      > title... Is there another period nippon term that will fit better?
      >
      > Domo arigato gozaimas
      > Ja'mata!
      >
      > Fukushima Masanari Hanzo
      > Havre des Glaces Barony
    • Barbara Nostrand
      Noble Cousin! Greetings from Solveig! Yojinbo does not show up in my larger kogojiten. The movie is set in the mid 19th century. What are you trying to do with
      Message 2 of 8 , Sep 9, 2001
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        Noble Cousin!

        Greetings from Solveig! Yojinbo does not show up in my larger kogojiten.
        The movie is set in the mid 19th century. What are you trying to do with
        the "title" you are working on? Maybe you are looking for "retainer" or
        some similar concept?

        Your Humble Survant
        Solveig Throndardottir
        Amateur Scholar
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      • Anthony J. Bryant
        ... It doesn t show in my kogo jiten... For the record, it has connotations similar to hired gun in the Japanese vernacular, so it s not exactly a term of
        Message 3 of 8 , Sep 9, 2001
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          mgiard@... wrote:

          >
          > I would like to know if the term "yojimbo" is period (SCA) I'm
          > searching for a nippon version of the "men at arms" pseudo-unofficial-
          > title... Is there another period nippon term that will fit better?
          >

          It doesn't show in my kogo jiten...

          For the record, it has connotations similar to "hired gun" in the Japanese
          vernacular, so it's not exactly a term of respect. It's a job description to
          be sure, but not an elite one. <G>

          As to "man at arms" -- it depends. What do *you* mean by "man at arms"?
          Someone who carries a weapon, a guard, a retainer, what? The term is rather
          vague.

          Effingham
        • Anthony J. Bryant
          ... Well, actually, historically speaking, bushi *were* samurai. There are various terms to describe retainers and the like (kinjuu, koshou, etc.) but the
          Message 4 of 8 , Sep 9, 2001
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            roningold@... wrote:

            > I would recomend 'Bushi' as the correct term to use. It was the most
            > common reference to a 'man-at-arms' that had no status as a samurai
            > or samurai's retainer.
            >

            Well, actually, historically speaking, bushi *were* samurai.

            There are various terms to describe retainers and the like (kinjuu, koshou,
            etc.) but the exact term depends on the job description.

            Effingham
          • mgiard@hotmail.com
            Konnichi Wah Effingham -dono! ... arms ? ... is rather ... Ok, I m member of a small sca fighting household(not even official). Our household leader is a
            Message 5 of 8 , Sep 11, 2001
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              Konnichi Wah Effingham -dono!

              > As to "man at arms" -- it depends. What do *you* mean by "man at
              arms"?
              > Someone who carries a weapon, a guard, a retainer, what? The term
              is rather
              > vague.

              Ok, I'm member of a small sca fighting household(not even
              official). Our household leader is a squire for now( Lord Morgan
              MacGowan) and we try to add some roleplaying flavor in our household.
              So everyone in the household try to add a personal/cultural flavor of
              his implication in our household
              The other members, like me, are all but men-at-arms of our leader.
              We help him to set up for combat, we share special combat manoeuvers,
              we train as a small melee unit under command of our leader, etc... We
              help him being someday knighted and, in return he help up someday
              being squired...
              The term "squire" or "retainer" would be better... I know there is
              no such thing as a squire in feudal japan... But may be a
              equivalent "job description"...

              By the way, forgive my english mispellings and mistakes, I'm
              francophone... Trying to write engligh and pretending being
              japanese... ;-)

              Thank you very much for you help!

              Ja'mata!

              Fukushima Masanari Hanzo
            • Barbara Nostrand
              Noble Cousin! Greetings from Solveig! Your solution is really very simple. You are a vassal of this squire. He is a vassal of his knight. You might be
              Message 6 of 8 , Sep 12, 2001
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                Noble Cousin!

                Greetings from Solveig! Your solution is really very simple. You are
                a vassal of this squire. He is a vassal of his knight. You might be
                interested to know that I prefer to call knights "busho" which means
                general. Regardless, you appear to be in a state of vassalage. Which
                is wonderfully appropriate. You are not a "masterless samurai" you
                are employed! Try Hard!

                Your Humble Servant
                Solveig Throndardottir
                Amateur Scholar
                --
                +---------------------------------------------------------------------+
                | Barbara Nostrand, Ph.D. | Solveig Throndardottir, CoM |
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              • Anthony J. Bryant
                ... Then the term you want is kinjou (better, kinjo with a macron on the O ). Effingham
                Message 7 of 8 , Sep 12, 2001
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                  mgiard@... wrote:

                  > Konnichi Wah Effingham -dono!
                  >
                  > > As to "man at arms" -- it depends. What do *you* mean by "man at
                  > arms"?
                  > > Someone who carries a weapon, a guard, a retainer, what? The term
                  > is rather
                  > > vague.
                  >
                  > Ok, I'm member of a small sca fighting household(not even
                  > official). Our household leader is a squire for now( Lord Morgan
                  > MacGowan) and we try to add some roleplaying flavor in our household.
                  > So everyone in the household try to add a personal/cultural flavor of
                  > his implication in our household
                  > The other members, like me, are all but men-at-arms of our leader.
                  > We help him to set up for combat, we share special combat manoeuvers,
                  > we train as a small melee unit under command of our leader, etc... We
                  > help him being someday knighted and, in return he help up someday
                  > being squired...
                  > The term "squire" or "retainer" would be better... I know there is
                  > no such thing as a squire in feudal japan... But may be a
                  > equivalent "job description"...
                  >
                  > By the way, forgive my english mispellings and mistakes, I'm
                  > francophone... Trying to write engligh and pretending being
                  > japanese... ;-)
                  >
                  > Thank you very much for you help!
                  >

                  Then the term you want is "kinjou" (better, "kinjo" with a macron on the
                  "O").


                  Effingham
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