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Re: [SCA-JML] New essay up -- Shinden-zukuri estates

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  • Anthony J. Bryant
    ... Thank you. ... That s what Izutsu-san said. We both have this fantasy about building and living in a shinden. He laments that he has all the equipment
    Message 1 of 5 , Aug 1 8:40 PM
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      bun-ami wrote:

      > WOW!
      >
      > Excellent job Baron Edward.

      Thank you.

      > Now to find some land to actual build one!
      >

      That's what Izutsu-san said. <G> We both have this fantasy about building and
      living in a shinden. He laments that he has all the equipment and fittings at
      his disposal (his company does that sort of thing) but not the land, whereas
      in America *I* can get the land, but not have the equipment. He said if I ever
      build one to let him know, because he wants in on it. <G>

      Effingham
    • Barbara Nostrand
      Izutsu Dono! Greetings from Solveig! Do you really have access to ALL of the equipment and fittings? I have aspired to live in a shinden for at least a good
      Message 2 of 5 , Aug 2 7:15 AM
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        Izutsu Dono!

        Greetings from Solveig! Do you really have access to ALL of
        the equipment and fittings? I have aspired to live in a shinden
        for at least a good twenty years now. If I ever manage to stop
        moving, maybe I could acquire land for one. However, I have to
        make it cost no more than a house of the same square footage.
        This was also one of the reasons I was interested in living
        in West Virginia where they mostly do not have building codes
        to worry about. They don't have building codes in rural Missouri
        either.

        I believe that there is some modest importation of Japanese
        building materials. The real expense comes in when you import
        Japanese carpenters to put the building together. I think that
        it may be possible to use local help. That was one of the
        attractions about the school in Rhode Island I interviewed at
        this year. They have a school of architecture. Some places have
        departments of construction. For that matter, lots of Junior
        Colleges have carpentry programs. The real problem is to find
        a place that makes a house kit with the pieces precut. Of course
        a lot of modern Japanese construction is actual out of fero-
        concreate.

        The odd thing is that American house kit manufacturers have been
        trying to develop a Japanese market while the Japanese have been
        ignoring the American market. Too bad. I would think that a fair
        number of them could be moved in the back pages of Sunset, Mother
        Jones, &c. The major architectural modification I would like to
        see is provision for central HVAC. I think that this can be
        achieved by using the sub-floor area and the roof area as an
        air plenum for a forced air system. With concrete construction,
        the air system could even be placed in the walls so as to have
        modest wall vents near the floor or ceiling.

        Your Humble Servant
        Solveig Throndardottir
        Amateur Scholar
      • Anthony J. Bryant
        ... I m confused... Why are you asking Izutsu-san about this? He s not here, y know. For the record, he does -- they do shrine and temple architectural
        Message 3 of 5 , Aug 2 2:34 PM
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          Barbara Nostrand wrote:

          > Izutsu Dono!
          >

          ????

          >
          > Greetings from Solveig! Do you really have access to ALL of
          > the equipment and fittings?

          I'm confused... Why are you asking Izutsu-san about this? He's not here,
          y'know. <G>

          For the record, he does -- they do shrine and temple architectural bits.

          > I have aspired to live in a shinden
          > for at least a good twenty years now. If I ever manage to stop
          > moving, maybe I could acquire land for one. However, I have to
          > make it cost no more than a house of the same square footage.

          That would be the challenge.

          >
          > This was also one of the reasons I was interested in living
          > in West Virginia where they mostly do not have building codes
          > to worry about. They don't have building codes in rural Missouri
          > either.

          If I could stand either state.... <G>

          >
          > I believe that there is some modest importation of Japanese
          > building materials. The real expense comes in when you import
          > Japanese carpenters to put the building together.

          That's where "cheating" comes in.

          It would pretty much have to be built to Code, and that might call for some
          severe changes (structural, not cosmetic).

          One thing that might work in terms of dealing with Codes (minimum clearances
          and pathways and access and so on) is that it's a recreation of an
          historical structure -- but I don't think that sort of argument flies with
          bureaucrats.

          Fortunately, there was a time when I was an architecture major (many, many
          moons ago) and still have some of my textbooks, so I can do the research on
          what is and isn't allowed --at least in terms of structural tolerances.

          One of the "differences" would be floor-based radiant heat (the tubes
          conducting heated water) in the main areas -- the moya and hisashi -- of the
          shinden and tai no ya. Another difference would be that, although raised on
          pillars, the part of the buildings directly under these main areas would
          also be closed off (i.e., solid, rising foundations) to secure any heating
          so that cold air flowing under doesn't negate the heating. That's easy
          enough to camouflage, however, as it's set back four feet from the edges of
          the veranda, and when covered underneath with lattice work it shouldn't
          intrude as a "mundanity".

          Oh, yeah. I've been thinking a LOT about this. <G>

          Effingham
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