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Re: [SCA-JML] Re: blackened teeth

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  • J. Wallace
    ... Ms. Nostrand: I am interested in the daily life of middle class bushi women, the ones that actually knew how to wield a weapon. That noble court stuff
    Message 1 of 45 , Jun 14, 2001
      --- Barbara Nostrand <nostrand@...> wrote:
      > Noble Cousin!
      >
      > I agree that the books by Mass are in the must read
      > category. There
      > is another book originally in French and later
      > translated into English
      > with a title like: Daily Life in the Time of the
      > Samurai which is
      > another book that you should really check out. If
      > you are interested
      > in the bushi, you should read Heavenly Warriors by
      > William Wayne
      > Farris. What sort of things are you specifically
      > interested in. There
      > are now a number of area experts out there.
      >
      > Your Humble Servant
      > Solveig Throndardottir
      > Amateur Scholar

      Ms. Nostrand:

      I am interested in the daily life of middle class
      bushi women, the ones that actually knew how to wield
      a weapon. That noble court stuff just isn't my thing.
      I am also interested in learning how to construct a
      nagatina (is that right?) that can be used at SCA
      events, as well as learning how to use it. As I
      learned during my research, the nagatina and archery
      were the most common combat tools and methods used by
      bushi women during that era (I'm also going to try out
      for combat archery at the pre-Pennsic qualification
      thing).

      I don't know if I will make it to Pennsic this year(I
      have boot camp and stuff), but I will definitely try
      to make it to next year's Pennsic. Hopefully by then,
      I will have a bona fide persona worked out.

      sincerely,
      Kushami gozen
      > --
      >
      +---------------------------------------------------------------------+
      > | Barbara Nostrand, Ph.D. | Solveig
      > Throndardottir, CoM |
      > | deMoivre Institute | Carolingia
      > Statis Mentis Est |
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    • Barbara Nostrand
      Shonaigawa Dono! Greetings from Solveig! If you ignore the rice fields, everything from Tohoku North, plus Kamikochi and a few other central mountain areas
      Message 45 of 45 , Jun 20, 2001
        Shonaigawa Dono!

        Greetings from Solveig! If you ignore the rice fields,
        everything from Tohoku North, plus Kamikochi and a
        few other central mountain areas looks like Washington
        State except miniaturized somewhat.

        As for the Old Norse business. One interesting feature
        of early Japanese architecture is log buildings. Log
        buildings are actually fairly uncommon. The Haida,
        Klinget, &c did not have log buildings. They built
        split plank buildings. The Norse, the Volga Russ (more
        Norse), and the Japanese built log buildings.

        I can see how you are finding similiarities between
        Ainu textile patterns and North Pacific coastal texitle
        patterns, but they are also distinctly different. Totem
        poles are actually quite interesting. Only two Pacific
        Coastal tribes originally did free standing totem poles.
        However, totem pole like lodge poles can be found
        pretty much ubiquitously among North Pacific coastal
        indians and in a variety of Polynesian cultures. The
        Ainu do not appear to be genetically related to this
        group, but they could have acquired this cultural
        artifact from trans-Pacific sources.

        If you are interested in truly radical Archeological
        theory, Thor Hyrdahl (sp) posits extensive trans Pacific
        commerce, &c. by the PNW coastal groups and especially
        the Haida who were the vikings of the Pacific Northwest.

        The Haida are definitely known to have practiced
        celestial navigation out of sight of land. Their
        canoes were definitely seaworthy. Aside from theories
        about their involvement with the Easter Islanders, they
        are definitely known to have undertaken voyages of
        hundreds or even thousands of nautical miles on a
        regular basis.

        Japanese involvement with the three kingdoms on Chosenhanto
        (Korean Penninsula) is pretty well established and involves
        much easier journeys than trans-Pacific journeys. Please
        understand that the national founding legend for Atera
        (New Zealand) involves the voyagers in danger of starvation
        on their canoes at the time they spot a cloud bank on the
        horizon. (Atera basically means long cloud bank and is the
        name for New Zealand. I was friends with a New Zealander
        about a year ago.)

        One thing that you do have to watch out for with touristy
        spots is that they sometimes deliberatly put in things
        intended to look exotic. This may not be the case with
        the village that you visited. But, it is something to
        watch out for.

        As I recall, part of the Japanese version of the Indian
        Wars involved forced resettlement of at least some of
        the conquered groups. Among other things, Japanese are
        notibly hairier than groups across the sea of Japan, and
        some Japanese are notibly hairier than others. This
        hairiness is not normally part of the Amerind phenotype.
        The Ainu on the other hand are noted for being quite
        hairy.

        According to most estimates there are almost no pure-blooded
        Ainu left. However, even the photographs from Batchelor's
        Ainu studies show significantly hairly people. In a recent
        Monumenta Nipponica article, the diary of the Rusian official
        who occupied Shakalin following the Pacific War noted the
        preponderance of curly haired children among the Japanese
        population. Curly hair is also not noted as an Amerind feature.

        Your Humble Servant
        Solveig Throndardottir
        Amateur Scholar
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