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RE: [SCA-JML] Late Heian Men's Clothing & "Jidai Ishou no Nuikata" Patterns

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  • Barbara Nostrand
    Noble Cousin! Greetings From Solveig! The suikan in question is the middle garment on the second row of the back cover of the Nuikata book. The text pretty
    Message 1 of 10 , Apr 30, 2001
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      Noble Cousin!

      Greetings From Solveig! The suikan in question is the middle
      garment on the second row of the back cover of the Nuikata
      book. The text pretty much says that the suikan was an
      outgrowth of the kariginu and was the day wear of the buke
      during the Kamakura period. The commentary does not suggest
      a reallyi strong distinction between the adult suikan and
      a juvenile suikan. However, I would like to make a few
      suggestions: 1) Increase the dimensions. 2) Try to match
      the fabric selected to that depicted in period illustrations
      of adults, and 3) consider whether or not adult bushi were
      still wearing the pom pom decoration during your period of
      interest.

      Your Humble Servant
      Solveig Throndardottir
      Amateur Scholar
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    • Kass McGann
      Thank you for the advice; I ve actually been considering using the pattern that you mentioned for a while, but due to my lack of knowledge of such garments and
      Message 2 of 10 , May 1, 2001
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        Thank you for the advice; I've actually been considering using the pattern that you mentioned for a while, but due to my lack of knowledge of such garments and substandard sewing skills was a bit intimidated by the absence of directions. I guess I'll have to give it a try soon, using my poor translations of the "Jidai Ishou no Nuikata" pattern as crutch for my ignorance of period clothing.
        >>>>
        Dear, dear Christopher.  Don't hurt yourself thinking about this too much.  Rectangles.  It's rectangles.  It's the simplest thing in the world to sew together.  I have confidence that you can do this!
        >>>>
        What fabric should I use, by the way? I noticed that you recommend habotai on you website (which I enjoyed immensely), but what weight is appropriate, and to what extent is colour restricted?
        >>>>
        You should probably avoid habotai for the suikan itself because it's too soft and flowing, but you can use it for kosode, hitoe, and hakama just fine (use the heaviest weight you can find).  For the suikan, you can use any reeled (not spun) silk.  The stiffer, the better.  You want your fabric to have body and rigidity to make the right forms.  Avoid things like dupioni, shantung (stuff with slubs which would have been considered "flaws" in period) and stay as far away as possible from silk noil ("raw" silk).  For suikan, patterned guaze weaves were often used.  The best modern substitute for this is organza.  It has the right stiffness and look.  The only problem is that you can't get it in those nifty woven patterns in the US.  But hey!  Suikan were often unpatterned too.
         
        I'm not aware that there were colour restrictions on suikan at all.  But it occurs to me that I've never seen them in black or purple or red.  You see a lot of white ones, though (for servants).  If you avoid the top rank colours for sokutai (black, purple, and tomato red), I think you'll be fine.
        >>>>
        Also, what other garments accompany the suikan? I gather that several kosode (of similar or different patterns?) are used, but what about hitoe and under-hakama?
        >>>>
        I don't know if "several" kosode are worn.  Remember that this is not a formal outfit.  I would wear a white kosode, a red or white hitoe (just cut a little larger than the kosode), and sashinuki hakama in a contrasting colour (unless you want to portray a servant, and then it's all white).  You can use the pattern in the files section here for the hakama.
        >>>>
        Thank you for your help & patience.
        >>>>
        Anytime.
         
        Kass
        aka Fujiwara no Aoi
      • C. J. Wallace
        ... Oh, I see. Thank you for clarifying the term; I had thought it might have something to do with the actual design of the garment. Sincerely, Christopher
        Message 3 of 10 , May 2, 2001
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          > Not sure, but 'kuzufu' is grass cloth and 'katsui' is a thin, coarse hemp
          > kimono (katsu being another pronunciation of 'kuzu') so I would think it
          > might be referring to the fabric used in the sashinuki. Anoyone else know
          > better?
          >
          > -Ii

          Oh, I see. Thank you for clarifying the term; I had thought it might have
          something to do with the actual design of the garment.

          Sincerely,

          Christopher Wallace
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