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Re: [SCA-JML] Tachi, katana and wakizashi (additonal info)

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  • Anthony J. Bryant
    ... Yup. That s why it s there. Effingham
    Message 1 of 22 , Mar 26, 2001
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      "Hart, Steve" wrote:

      > > Aristocratic military official, full court dress:
      > > http://www.iz2.or.jp/fukusyoku/wayou/5.htm
      >
      > So was the bow and arrow quiver actually a part of the court dress? I would
      > think that would be...awkward...to say the least. :D
      >

      Yup. That's why it's there.


      Effingham
    • Blkrose@aol.com
      In a message dated 3/25/2001 9:02:03 PM Eastern Standard Time, SyrTheo writes: Hello Listka, I have kept my thoughts in red because of to many tracks to
      Message 2 of 22 , Mar 26, 2001
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        In a message dated 3/25/2001 9:02:03 PM Eastern Standard Time, SyrTheo writes:

        Hello Listka,

        I have kept my thoughts in red because of to many tracks to follow. I hope
        this does not upset anyone.
        Theo

        Greetings Edward-sama,

        Where these doohickies a permanent part of the saya?, or add ons of some
        type for just that occasion?

        Proper way?, presumably by the nobility?!?





        In fact, there were little doohikies made to allow one to sling the katana
        at the
        side like a tachi, as that was considered the proper way to wear a sword.
        It
        wasn't until really the end of our period that katana predominated on the
        battlefield so much.




        Sure because the way battlefield tactics had developed with the use of more
        ashigaru, especially using the yari, and matchlock, [can't quite remember
        the Japanese name] the more easily controlled [and held in place] obi
        mounted katana became an important secondary weapon, and yet well out of
        the way when using the primary infantry weapons of the day.


        <<<<On the field generals and those of rank still wore tachi,



        while those who didn't have tachi-fitted swords just stuck the sword
        through the
        sash.


        Effingham>>>


        It seems to me that the Tachi became more and more a symbol of rank, then
        actually the std weapon for wear, by guards and other warriors who might
        be put to task at a moments notice. Being an Iaidoka, I can attest to the
        much simpler case of wearing the kat in the obi, instead of on a
        longer-double hung- flop around if you don't hold onto it, tachi mounted
        sword. :0)  This is speculation though, what is the fact in this matter?



        Sincerely,

        Theo [who is still working on a Japanese name] Thanks for the site. Very
        helpful.  You know me some Edward, Any recommendations on a Name!? :0)



      • Anthony J. Bryant
        ... Permanent. The entire set of sword furniture would be changeable (scabbard, guard, hilt...) ... Unfortunately, I can t recall the context for proper
        Message 3 of 22 , Mar 30, 2001
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          Theo wrote:

          >>
          >> Greetings Edward-sama,
          >>
          >> Where these doohickies a permanent part of the saya?, or add ons of
          >> some
          >> type for just that occasion?
          >>
          >
          Permanent. The entire set of sword furniture would be changeable
          (scabbard, guard, hilt...)

          >>
          >> Proper way?, presumably by the nobility?!?
          >
          Unfortunately, I can't recall the context for "proper way."...

          >>
          >>
          >> Sure because the way battlefield tactics had developed with the use
          >> of more
          >> ashigaru, especially using the yari, and matchlock, [can't quite
          >> remember
          >> the Japanese name]
          >
          which one? <G> Teppo, tanegashima, hinawajuu, take your pick. <G>

          >> the more easily controlled [and held in place] obi
          >> mounted katana became an important secondary weapon, and yet well
          >> out of
          >> the way when using the primary infantry weapons of the day.
          >
          Makes sense!

          >> It seems to me that the Tachi became more and more a symbol of rank,
          >> then
          >
          I think that would probably be a safe observation.

          >>
          >>
          >> > actually the std weapon for wear, by guards and other warriors who
          >> > might
          >> > be put to task at a moments notice. Being an Iaidoka, I can attest
          >> > to the
          >> > much simpler case of wearing the kat in the obi, instead of on a
          >> > longer-double hung- flop around if you don't hold onto it, tachi
          >> > mounted
          >> > sword. :0) This is speculation though, what is the fact in this
          >> > matter?
          >>

          What fact? <G> Seriously, I think you're pretty much on with the
          situation.

          >>
          >>
          >> Theo [who is still working on a Japanese name] Thanks for the site.
          >> Very
          >> helpful. You know me some Edward, Any recommendations on a Name!?
          >> :0)
          >

          Well, I'm trying to think of something that comes across as "studly
          fighter guy" but nothing springs to mind at the moment <wink>.

          A "strong-sounding" surname might be "Yamagata" (mountain-form) or
          "Motoyama" (first/original/basic-mountain).

          Effingham
        • Chris Gregory
          My aunt Seiko is Japanese (well, she married into my Mother s side, which makes her my aunt.) Suppose I wanted to use her (documentably very old) family name
          Message 4 of 22 , Mar 31, 2001
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            My aunt Seiko is Japanese (well, she married into my Mother's side, which
            makes her my aunt.) Suppose I wanted to use her (documentably very old)
            family name in my name for my persona; is that Kosher? I would of course
            check with her regarding the ability to use it. I'm just wondering if we
            can use a family that is documented as existing for our name.

            If not, I'd need a family name all the way from 1200 (and no, NOT Minamoto!)

            Domo Arigato,
            Richard until further notice
            --
            "A monk in all seriousness asked Joshu 'Has a dog Buddha-nature or not?'
            Joshu retorted 'Mu!'"
            Koan 1, Mumonkan, Wu-men
          • J. Badgley
            ... People do that all the time in the SCA. What is the family name? How old is very old ? How documentable? Those are the only truly necessary questions,
            Message 5 of 22 , Mar 31, 2001
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              On Sat, 31 Mar 2001, Chris Gregory wrote:

              > My aunt Seiko is Japanese (well, she married into my Mother's side, which
              > makes her my aunt.) Suppose I wanted to use her (documentably very old)
              > family name in my name for my persona; is that Kosher? I would of course
              > check with her regarding the ability to use it. I'm just wondering if we
              > can use a family that is documented as existing for our name.

              People do that all the time in the SCA. What is the family name? How old
              is 'very old'? How documentable?

              Those are the only truly necessary questions, I would think. Well, and
              is the name presumptuous would be another.

              -Ii
            • Anthony J. Bryant
              ... When I was in college in Florida, there was a student I met briefly (an exchange student or something like that) from Japan whose surname was Tokugawa. For
              Message 6 of 22 , Mar 31, 2001
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                "J. Badgley" wrote:

                >
                > Those are the only truly necessary questions, I would think. Well, and
                > is the name presumptuous would be another.

                When I was in college in Florida, there was a student I met briefly (an
                exchange student or something like that) from Japan whose surname was
                Tokugawa.

                For some odd reason, I envied the hell out him for just that little fact.


                Effingham
              • Barbara Nostrand
                Noble Cousin! There is no problem with using your Aunt s maden name provided that it is documentably pre-1601. As for Minamoto, why not Minamoto? It is a
                Message 7 of 22 , Apr 1 5:58 PM
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                  Noble Cousin!

                  There is no problem with using your Aunt's maden name provided that it
                  is documentably pre-1601. As for Minamoto, why not Minamoto? It is
                  a perfectly fine family name. About the only pre-1601 family name that
                  you need avoid is Toyotomi.

                  Your Humble Servant
                  Solveig Throndardottir
                  Amateur Scholar
                  --
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                • Blkrose@aol.com
                  LOL :0D If I knew how to say it in Japanese I would........ You da Man!! ... I was once told that I should translate thunder-stick and take that as a
                  Message 8 of 22 , Apr 2 4:57 PM
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                    LOL   :0D

                    If I knew how to say it in Japanese I would........" You da Man!!"




                    Well, I'm trying to think of something that comes across as "studly
                    fighter guy" but nothing springs to mind at the moment <wink>.

                    A "strong-sounding" surname might be "Yamagata" (mountain-form) or
                    "Motoyama" (first/original/basic-mountain).

                    Effingham


                    I was once told that I should translate "thunder-stick" and take that as a
                    name. :0)    Any suggestions?

                    Thanks My Friend.

                    Theo

                  • Anthony J. Bryant
                    ... ... Not as such, I m afraid.... Gotta think about this one. Effingham
                    Message 9 of 22 , Apr 3 3:29 PM
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                      Blkrose@... wrote:

                      > LOL :0D
                      >
                      > If I knew how to say it in Japanese I would........" You da Man!!"
                      >
                      >

                      <G>

                      > I was once told that I should translate "thunder-stick" and take that
                      > as a
                      > name. :0) Any suggestions?

                      Not as such, I'm afraid....

                      Gotta think about this one.


                      Effingham
                    • Blkrose@aol.com
                      In a message dated 4/3/2001 6:28:52 PM Eastern Daylight Time, ... OK, Thanks! Theo
                      Message 10 of 22 , Apr 3 4:49 PM
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                        In a message dated 4/3/2001 6:28:52 PM Eastern Daylight Time,
                        ajbryant@... writes:


                        Gotta think about this one.



                        OK, Thanks!
                        Theo
                      • Anthony J. Bryant
                        ... Nope, not a bit. Very common name pattern, and not very upper class. Effingham
                        Message 11 of 22 , Jul 13, 2001
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                          Nate Ledbetter wrote:

                          > Hiraizumi-dono e moushi agemasu* (or anybody else who
                          > knows):
                          >
                          > I was re-reading through your miscellany section on
                          > naming practices and I had a question. You cover the
                          > "don'ts" of naming like not using titles such as
                          > Naninaniemon and Naninanisuke and Naninaninokami.
                          > Gotcha. However, you didn't say anything about
                          > Naninanibei....for instance, Takenaka Hanbei, or
                          > Kuroda Kanbei, for example. I know that these men had
                          > other nanori that aren't typically given as their
                          > popularly known names. Does the --bei fall in the same
                          > category as the above no-no's?
                          >

                          Nope, not a bit. Very common name pattern, and not very upper class.



                          Effingham
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