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Bamboo or Rattan

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  • echo@imap.pitt.edu
    I was wondering if anyone knew where I can get a hold of bamboo or rattan, either whole or in strips. Either that or if anyone can help direct me to a place
    Message 1 of 5 , Feb 6, 2001
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      I was wondering if anyone knew where I can get a hold of bamboo or
      rattan, either whole or in strips. Either that or if anyone can help
      direct me to a place that sells fiberglass yumi. I'm really not sure
      how to make a kyudo bow, so I'll either need a lot of material or a
      shop to buy one from. The cheapest I found a fiberglass one online
      is about $370.

      Thanks.

      -Luis Torrefranca
      (Pittsburgh, PA)
    • Don Luby
      Hi Luis! ... I assume you ve done moderately good web searches for sameand haven t foudn quite what you re looking for? If you want, I could let you know the
      Message 2 of 5 , Feb 7, 2001
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        Hi Luis!

        On Wed, 7 Feb 2001 echo@... wrote:

        > I was wondering if anyone knew where I can get a hold of bamboo or
        > rattan, either whole or in strips.

        I assume you've done moderately good web searches for sameand
        haven't foudn quite what you're looking for?
        If you want, I could let you know the next time we're doing an order
        (for rattan), which should be some ti later in the spring and could
        include you in it; going rate for "weapons grade" rattan these days
        comes to about $2/ft after shipping, so a 10' staff will run you about
        $20. I could arrange a drop in town somewhere, or you could just drop
        by fighting practice (same time and place).
        Or, you could order from H. H. Perkins (www.hhperkins.com) yourself.

        > Either that or if anyone can help direct me to a place that sells
        > fiberglass yumi. I'm really not sure how to make a kyudo bow, so
        > I'll either need a lot of material or a shop to buy one from.

        It's very arcane, I can tell you that; there's a fairly close
        acquaintance of mine (I don't think I really know him well enough to
        consider him a friend) who makes all sorts of bows, though he
        specializes in yumi, and from what I've gotten in talking with him
        it's much harder than you might expect, especially when you haven't
        fully considered its asymmetry and the different materials used in
        laminate. And, as I understand it, the bamboo should really cure for
        some extended period of time before being made into a bow, though not
        as long as for arrows, which I believe should be left to cure for
        deacdes before being used.

        > The cheapest I found a fiberglass one online is about $370.

        Asahi America (http://www.kyudo.com/asahiam-yumi.html) for $315, and
        the prices go up from there (carbon resin ones are about the same
        price, but bamboo are twice that and more).
        Also, if you're actually planning on doing kyudo, rather than
        western archery with a yumi, there are a few other things which you'll
        need, specifically the gloves (which run $170+) and unusually long
        arrows (approx 1 m for someone your size).

        > Thanks.
        >
        > -Luis Torrefranca
        > (Pittsburgh, PA)


        Koredono
        Knight Marshal, Debatable Lands

        -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Don Luby Magariki Katsuichi no Koredono
        djl@... Yama-kaminari-ryu
        Pittsburgh, PA Debatable Lands, AEthelmearc
      • Anthony J. Bryant
        ... One further note -- you should *not* try to teach yourself kyudo. It was six months before I could even touch a bow. And of more importance than the bow
        Message 3 of 5 , Feb 7, 2001
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          Don Luby wrote:

          >
          > Asahi America (http://www.kyudo.com/asahiam-yumi.html) for $315, and
          > the prices go up from there (carbon resin ones are about the same
          > price, but bamboo are twice that and more).
          > Also, if you're actually planning on doing kyudo, rather than
          > western archery with a yumi, there are a few other things which you'll
          > need, specifically the gloves (which run $170+) and unusually long
          > arrows (approx 1 m for someone your size).

          One further note -- you should *not* try to teach yourself kyudo. It was six
          months before I could even touch a bow.

          And of more importance than the bow itself is a good fitting, well-made yugake.
          That should be your first purchase as you can't shoot without one.

          Effingham
        • Don Luby
          ... Sure. OTOH, since there is (as far as I can tell) no place to really learn kyudo within 250+ miles of Pittsburgh, what would you suggest as a feasible and
          Message 4 of 5 , Feb 7, 2001
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            On Wed, 7 Feb 2001, Anthony J. Bryant wrote:

            > Don Luby wrote:
            >
            >>
            >> Asahi America (http://www.kyudo.com/asahiam-yumi.html) for $315, and
            >> the prices go up from there (carbon resin ones are about the same
            >> price, but bamboo are twice that and more).
            >> Also, if you're actually planning on doing kyudo, rather than
            >> western archery with a yumi, there are a few other things which you'll
            >> need, specifically the gloves (which run $170+) and unusually long
            >> arrows (approx 1 m for someone your size).
            >
            > One further note -- you should *not* try to teach yourself kyudo. It
            > was six months before I could even touch a bow.

            Sure. OTOH, since there is (as far as I can tell) no place to
            really learn kyudo within 250+ miles of Pittsburgh, what would you
            suggest as a feasible and reasonable alternative?

            > And of more importance than the bow itself is a good fitting,
            > well-made yugake. That should be your first purchase as you can't
            > shoot without one.

            Also true; even after taking measurements and whatnot at Pennsic,
            the yugake ordered for me was a little too small and had to be
            exchanged for a larger size.

            > Effingham


            Koredono

            -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
            Don Luby Magariki Katsuichi no Koredono
            djl@... Yama-kaminari-ryu
            Pittsburgh, PA Debatable Lands, AEthelmearc
          • Anthony J. Bryant
            ... Find someone in your area who *does* do kyudo and beg him to teach you. Like all martial arts, this isn t something you can learn from a book. You need to
            Message 5 of 5 , Feb 9, 2001
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              Don Luby wrote:

              >
              > Sure. OTOH, since there is (as far as I can tell) no place to
              > really learn kyudo within 250+ miles of Pittsburgh, what would you
              > suggest as a feasible and reasonable alternative?
              >

              Find someone in your area who *does* do kyudo and beg him to teach you. Like all
              martial arts, this isn't something you can learn from a book. You need to have
              someone show you the proper moves, and practice them a lot. like I said, I think I
              went six months before I touched a real bow.

              I think we had this discussion last year on the list about the same subject, the
              importance of learning the moves properly and so on. (Look through the archives
              for "kyudo" and/or "kata".


              Effingham
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