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Horseback-riding cups?

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  • Kihō
    Greetings, I seem to recall that, years ago, I was in a class at Pennsic where I learned that samurai in late period had had a type of vessel called a
    Message 1 of 3 , Jun 23, 2013
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      Greetings,

      I seem to recall that, years ago, I was in a class at Pennsic where I
      learned that samurai in late period had had a type of vessel called a
      "horseback-riding cup", formed from a half coconut shell or turtle
      shell, lacquered on the inside, with a cord attached for hanging from
      the obi. Recently coming into the possession of a coconut shell, I
      was going to make one. However, I've been unable to dig up any
      information about them beyond a single example,
      http://www.horniman.ac.uk/collections/browse-our-collections/object/68431
      , from the late Edo period, and I've been unable to figure out what
      they're actually called in Japanese. Does anyone happen to have any
      references or further information about this sort of thing?

      Thanks a bunch,
      ~Kihou
    • JL Badgley
      I hadn t heard of this before. It seems like a great project. I did find Bajo-hai or Bajyo hai (Horse rider cup) as a shape of teacup. You might start
      Message 2 of 3 , Jun 24, 2013
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        I hadn't heard of this before. It seems like a great project.

        I did find "Bajo-hai" or "Bajyo hai" (Horse rider cup) as a shape of
        teacup. You might start there. It may be that what you found was more of
        a description of a cup shape than its actual use.

        Making coconut bowls shouldn't be too difficult nor too far from period
        practice, you just need to make sure to use materials that are food safe if
        you can plan on using it (and if it isn't food safe, label I as such,
        somehow).

        Ii
        On Jun 24, 2013 9:04 AM, "Kihō" <kihou@...> wrote:

        > Greetings,
        >
        > I seem to recall that, years ago, I was in a class at Pennsic where I
        > learned that samurai in late period had had a type of vessel called a
        > "horseback-riding cup", formed from a half coconut shell or turtle
        > shell, lacquered on the inside, with a cord attached for hanging from
        > the obi. Recently coming into the possession of a coconut shell, I
        > was going to make one. However, I've been unable to dig up any
        > information about them beyond a single example,
        > http://www.horniman.ac.uk/collections/browse-our-collections/object/68431
        > , from the late Edo period, and I've been unable to figure out what
        > they're actually called in Japanese. Does anyone happen to have any
        > references or further information about this sort of thing?
        >
        > Thanks a bunch,
        > ~Kihou
        >
        >
        > ------------------------------------
        >
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      • Solveig Throndardottir
        Noble Cousin! Greetings from Solveig! I very much doubt that you would find a lot of coconuts in Japan. They are not generally speaking cultivated in Japan.
        Message 3 of 3 , Jun 25, 2013
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          Noble Cousin!

          Greetings from Solveig! I very much doubt that you would find a lot of coconuts in Japan. They are not generally speaking cultivated in Japan. The artifact that you found in the museum looks interesting. It is hard to know just how common they were.

          Your Humble Servant
          Solveig Throndardottir
          Amateur Scholar



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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