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Layers of Momoyama period men's garments

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  • wildcrimsonsky
    So I bought some white linen and have started working on my Kosode. However, as I research fabrics and designs for my Hakama and Kataginu, I ve run into a
    Message 1 of 3 , Jan 5, 2013
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      So I bought some white linen and have started working on my Kosode. However, as I research fabrics and designs for my Hakama and Kataginu, I've run into a question. In all the reference pictures I can find with men wearing a Kataginu, I see 3 layers of garments. The Kosode, then another garment that looks like a Hitatare with less bulky sleeves than the stand alone version, then the Kataginu on top of it all. In most examples the Hakama and Kataginu match, but the other garment is a different coordinating color.

      Am I seeing things? What is the middle layer garment? Is it a Hitatare?

      Please help untangle my confusion. Thank you.

      Best Regards,
      Sven Larsson
      (Eyler Larson)
    • Ishiyama Gen'tarou Yori'ie
      ... This is what makes it a kataginu kamishimo , when the kataginu and hakama are made from the same fabric. I have seen it written that to have the kataginu
      Message 2 of 3 , Jan 6, 2013
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        wildcrimsonsky wrote:
        > In most examples the Hakama and Kataginu match,

        This is what makes it a "kataginu kamishimo", when the kataginu and
        hakama are made from the same fabric.

        I have seen it written that to have the kataginu different from the
        hakama is often a sign of servitude. (I don't have a good reference
        for this, however.) That is, the kataginu would be of your master's
        livery. I have made special kataginu with the badges of my local
        kingdom and barony that I wear when I am acting in some official
        capacity like retaining, guarding, or processing.

        > Am I seeing things? What is the middle layer garment? Is it a Hitatare?

        In most cases, this is another kosode layer. The base later, often
        referred to as a "juban", is always white as you note. The juban and
        kosode have the same shape, as far as I know. I try to cut my colored
        or patterned kosode a little larger so they fit over the juban
        without binding.

        --
        THL Ishiyama Gen'tarou Yori'ie
        (mka: Elliott C. Evans)
        ishiyama@...
      • wildcrimsonsky
        Excellent, thank you. It is as I suspected and another Kosode layer slightly larger would match the illustrations. I also found that an Eri sugata or fake
        Message 3 of 3 , Jan 6, 2013
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          Excellent, thank you. It is as I suspected and another Kosode layer slightly larger would match the illustrations. I also found that an Eri sugata or fake collar can be used to avoid to many layers. This would be a good idea during the Georgia summer heat.

          Thank you for the info.

          Best Regards,
          Sven Larsson
          (Eyler Larson)

          --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, Ishiyama Gen'tarou Yori'ie wrote:
          >
          >
          > wildcrimsonsky wrote:
          > > In most examples the Hakama and Kataginu match,
          >
          > This is what makes it a "kataginu kamishimo", when the kataginu and
          > hakama are made from the same fabric.
          >
          > I have seen it written that to have the kataginu different from the
          > hakama is often a sign of servitude. (I don't have a good reference
          > for this, however.) That is, the kataginu would be of your master's
          > livery. I have made special kataginu with the badges of my local
          > kingdom and barony that I wear when I am acting in some official
          > capacity like retaining, guarding, or processing.
          >
          > > Am I seeing things? What is the middle layer garment? Is it a Hitatare?
          >
          > In most cases, this is another kosode layer. The base later, often
          > referred to as a "juban", is always white as you note. The juban and
          > kosode have the same shape, as far as I know. I try to cut my colored
          > or patterned kosode a little larger so they fit over the juban
          > without binding.
          >
          > --
          > THL Ishiyama Gen'tarou Yori'ie
          > (mka: Elliott C. Evans)
          > ishiyama@...
          >
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