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  • Joshua Badgley
    Here s a concept that just came to me and I m thinking of implementing, and would like comments, suggestions, etc. I was thinking it might be neat to have an
    Message 1 of 7 , Dec 31, 2000
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      Here's a concept that just came to me and I'm thinking of implementing,
      and would like comments, suggestions, etc. I was thinking it might be
      neat to have an online 'Japanese History Test' for those who want to see
      what they do and don't know about Japan. I was thinking that maybe there
      should be several levels: Easy, Medium, and Hard, and that each answer
      would give a small talk on that topic. I'm trying to figure out what
      would be the best to use for such a project.

      Here are some sample questions I thought up. I would like to make harder
      ones but I am loathe to do too much without sources handy to make sure I'm
      doing it right. Some questions I have for the list are (you can e-mail
      the replies privately to fsjlb4@...):
      -What kinds of questions would you like to see? If you have
      specific questions you think would be good, send them my way!
      -Would anyone ever use such a site?
      -Am I dreaming and should I try for something more realistic?

      I just thought this would be fun.

      -Ii Saburou

      Japanese Test Questions:

      Who are the 'Three Great Daimyos' of the Sengoku Jidai (Warring States
      Period)?
      a. Tokugawa Ieyasu, Ishida Mitsunari, and Kobayakawa Hideaki
      b. Minamoto Yoritomo, Taira Kiymori, and Minamoto Yorimasa
      c. Hiraizumi Tadanobu, Ogami Ittou, and Ii Katsumori
      d. Oda Nobunaga, Toyotomi Hideyoshi, and Tokugawa Ieyasu
      e. Takeda Shingen, Uesugi Kenshin, and Maeda Toshiie

      The war between the Taira and Minamoto families which saw the creation of
      the first shogun was:
      a. Sengoku Jidai
      b. Gempei Wars
      c. Battle of Sekigahara
      d. Pennsic

      The Heian Period is named for what was then the capital of Japan. Today,
      that city is known as:
      a. Tokyo
      b. Nagoya
      c. Kyoto
      d. Osaka
      e. Hiroshima

      The daimyou of the Warring States period often wore which of the following
      garments beneath their armour:
      a. Hitoe
      b. Hou
      c. Hitatare
      d. Yukata
      e. Sokutai

      The family that controlled the shogunate at the start of the Warring
      States Period was the:
      a. Tokugawa
      b. Hojo
      c. Ashikaga
      d. Fujiwara
      e. Yamakaminari

      'Tokugawa' was a name taken by Ieyasu later in life. His original family
      name was:
      a. Takeda
      b. Minamoto
      c. Matsudaira
      d. Fujiwara
      e. Ishida

      Which noble family was well known as the power behind the imperial throne
      during the Heian Period:
      a. Fujiwara
      b. Minamoto
      c. Taira
      d. Tokugawa
      e. Hiraizumi

      The magical creatures well-known for their martial skills, under which
      many famous swordsmen were said to have trained are called:
      a. Kappa
      b. Tanuki
      c. Tengu
      d. Kitsune
      e. Ryu

      Which of the following provinces were so well-known for their shinobi that
      spies and men of the shadows were known as 'men of' one of these
      provinces?
      a. Awa b. Omi c. Tosa d. Bungo
      e. Owari f. Shinano g. Iseshima h. Echigo
      i. Echizen j. Mikawa k. Yamato l. Surugi
      m. Kaga n. Musashi o. Satsuma p. Iga

      Bushi often had three prominent parts to their names. The second, or
      common name, is occassionally calledy the zokumyo. Another term for this
      is the:
      a. surname
      b. nanori
      c. yobina
      d. clan name
      e. namae

      The samurai have always been famous as horsemen, but their skills with the
      famous katana were a late addition to their repetoire. Originally, the
      samurai were best known for their skills with horse and:
      a. yumi, or bow
      b. yari, or spear
      c. naginata, or polearm
      d. nodachi, or great sword
      e. tachi, or straight sword

      There are many types of hats that the Japanese wore. Bushi would often
      wear which of the following beneath their helmet while fighting:
      a. tate-eboshi
      b. ori-eboshi
      c. kanmuri
      d. jingasa
      e. hiki-tate-eboshi

      Japanese did not often carry shields on their arms as did their European
      counterparts, instead using large, rectangular paldrouns that were often
      laced in special patterns. These shoulder-guards were called:
      a. kote
      b. sode
      c. do
      d. suneate
      e. haidate

      The entrance to most Shinto shrines is a special, gate-like structure
      known as a:
      a. mon
      b. torii
      c. genkan
      d. hashi
      e. geito

      Which of the following is not typically found in Japanese armour
      construction:
      a. lacquer
      b. metal
      c. leather
      d. bamboo
      e. silk

      In order to become shogun, a bushi had to be descended from what famous
      clan:
      a. Fujiwara
      b. Taira
      c. Ameterasu
      d. Minamoto
      e. Yamakaminari
    • Joshua Badgley
      Okay, here are my answers. I d like for people to correct me (especially on how to better word the part about the Fujiwara clan. I m not up on my own
      Message 2 of 7 , Dec 31, 2000
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        Okay, here are my answers. I'd like for people to correct me (especially
        on how to better word the part about the Fujiwara clan. I'm not up on my
        own history, which is why I did this)

        Japanese Test Questions:

        1. Who are the 'Three Great Daimyos' of the Sengoku Jidai (Warring States
        Period)?
        d. Oda Nobunaga, Toyotomi Hideyoshi, and Tokugawa Ieyasu
        During the Sengoku Jidai Oda Nobunaga gained control of much of Japan, but
        was assassinated before he could complete his ambition and take the title
        of 'Shogun'. One of his generals, Toyotomi Hideyoshi, punished the
        traitor and finished the conquest of Japan. However, because he had not
        been born into the samurai caste he could not become shogun, and instead
        he took the title of Taikou.


        2. The war between the Taira and Minamoto families which saw the creation
        of the first shogun was:
        b. Gempei Wars
        Minamoto Yorimasa rebelled against the rule of the Taira clan and failed,
        but this prompted his cousin, Minamoto Yoritomo, to take up the fight.
        Yoritomo won the rebellion, but took the title of 'shogun' rather than
        overthrow the emperor, establishing a form of government that would last
        until the Meiji Era.


        3. The Heian Period is named for what was then the capital of Japan.
        Today, that city is known as:
        c. Kyoto
        Japan's capital has moved several times. It has resided in Nara,
        Kamakura, and Edo (later called Tokyo). The most affluent period,
        however, is usually considered to be the Heian Jidai.

        4. The daimyou of the Warring States period often wore which of the
        following garments beneath their armour:
        a. Hitoe
        b. Hou
        c. Hitatare
        d. Yukata
        e. Sokutai
        The hitatare is the garment that most of the bushi would wear under their
        armour. Specifically this would be a yoroi-hitatare. The hitatare and
        hakama are usually a matched set with an--often white--obi. The hitoe is
        a single layer under-kimono, while the hou is a type of jacket. The
        yukata is a modern summer kimono and the sokutai is an official court
        outfit.

        5. The family that controlled the shogunate at the start of the Warring
        States Period was the:
        c. Ashikaga
        The warring states period could be said to have started with the
        assassination of the Ashikaga shogunate. The Ashikaga shoguns were
        briefly reinstated by Oda Nobunaga, but soon lost their hold on the
        position forever.

        6. 'Tokugawa' was a name taken by Ieyasu later in life. His original
        family name was:
        c. Matsudaira
        Matsudaira Takechiyo was held as a hostage while he was young and
        eventually exchanged with Imagawa for the life of another hostage. He
        took up service under Imagawa until Imagawa lost to Oda. Matsudaira, who
        changed his name to Tokugawa Ieyasu, controlled the Mikawa province and
        eventually allied himself with Oda Nobunaga and later Toyotomi Hideyoshi.
        Tokugawa would eventually take all in the Battle of Sekigahara where he
        defeated the supporters of young Toyotomi Hideyori (the son of Hideyoshi)
        and took the title of shogun.

        7. Which noble family was well known as the power behind the imperial
        throne during the Heian Period:
        a. Fujiwara
        For a long period of Japanese history the Fujiwara family ruled as regents
        of the emperors, manipulating the government from behind the throne. They
        did this by marrying the emperor to their daughters and having themselves
        appointed to powerful positions in the court. They never actually
        overthrew the emperor and placed themselves on the throne, however.

        8. The magical creatures well-known for their martial skills, under which
        many famous swordsmen were said to have trained are called:
        c. Tengu
        The tengu are the bird-spirits that are said to train the legendary
        swordsmen of Japan. The kappa are water spirits, often evil creatures
        that drag men to their watery graves. The tanuki is a raccoon-dog which
        is often personified as a drunkard and slothful, with the power to change
        its shape. Another shapeshifter, the kitsune or fox, is often more
        malignant. Where the tanuki is male and often portrayed as a commoner,
        the fox is many times portrayed as female and evil. The ryu is the
        dragon, which is mainly imported from Chinese mythology. The dragon is
        associated with water and the rains--the lightning was supposed to be the
        dragon as it leapt between heaven and earth.

        9. Which of the following provinces were so well-known for their shinobi
        that spies and men of the shadows were known as 'men of' one of these
        provinces?
        m. Kaga p. Iga
        Shinobi--later called ninja--were often referred to as 'a man from Kaga or
        Iga'. Both of these provinces had a good number of clans that would have
        been considered 'shinobi' during the Warring States period. 'Shinobu' is
        a Japanese word that literally means to steal in and is drawn as a sword
        over a heart.

        10. Bushi often had three prominent parts to their names. The second, or
        common name, is occassionally calledy the zokumyo. Another term for this
        is the:
        c. yobina
        The 'yobina' is the name one is commonly called. It comes after the
        surname and before the nanori, or famous name.

        11. The samurai have always been famous as horsemen, but their skills with
        the famous katana were a late addition to their repetoire. Originally,
        the samurai were best known for their skills with horse and:
        a. yumi, or bow
        'Kyuba' was the original samurai method of fighting: the horse and bow.
        It wasn't until after the Mongol invasion of the 13th Century that the
        sword took on a truly prominent place in the bushi's arsenal.

        12. There are many types of hats that the Japanese wore. Bushi would
        often wear which of the following beneath their helmet while fighting:
        e. hiki-tate-eboshi
        This is a floppy version of the eboshi that lies well beneath a helmet.
        The tate-eboshi is court wear and sticks straight up. The ori-eboshi is
        elaborately folded and the kanmuri has too much to be truly comfortable
        beneath armour. The Jingasa is actually a type of helmet worn by ashigaru
        (foot soldiers).

        13. Japanese did not often carry shields on their arms as did their
        European counterparts, instead using large, rectangular paldrouns that
        were often laced in special patterns. These shoulder-guards were called:
        a. kote
        b. sode
        c. do
        d. suneate
        e. haidate

        The sode were the large, rectangular shoulder plates of Japanese armour.
        The kote were armoured sleeves, while the dou was the main torso. The
        suneate protected a warrior's shins and the haidate protected the thighs
        and upper legs.

        14. The entrance to most Shinto shrines is a special, gate-like structure
        known as a:
        b. torii
        The torii is the name of the typical gate in front of most Japanese
        shrines. It is a religious symbol particular to the native Japanese
        Shinto religion as the cross is a symbol of Christianity. They can be
        found in a variety of places made of many materials, but always holding
        the same shape. Inari harvest shrines are often characterized by a row of
        red-painted torii, often to the side of the main shrine of an area.

        15. Which of the following is not typically found in Japanese armour
        construction:
        d. bamboo
        Bamboo was not typically used in the construction of Japanese armour which
        was usually lacquered metal or leather laced with silk cords.

        16. In order to become shogun, a bushi had to be descended from what
        famous clan:
        d. Minamoto
        The title of shogun is granted only to those of the Minamoto clan. This
        was so important that Toytomi Hideyoshi could not become shogun because he
        rose from the ranks of the common Ashigaru. Tokugawa Ieyasu, in claiming
        the title, had historians research his geneaology to find a Minamoto
        connection. Some people claim that there is some doubt over to the
        accuracy of his claim, however, stating that the historians, after having
        presented their evidence, were not heard from again and the whole affair
        was swept under the table, as it were.


        -Ii
      • Gara of Lions Gate
        Hey now!!! Where s the answer key?!?! LOL I didn t gaman through those questions for the eGroups banner at the bottom you know! ;) Gara Here s a concept
        Message 3 of 7 , Jan 1, 2001
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          Hey now!!!  Where's the answer key?!?!  LOL  I didn't gaman through those questions for the eGroups banner at the bottom you know!  ;)
           
          Gara
           
           
           
           
          Here's a concept that just came to me and I'm thinking of implementing,
          and would like comments, suggestions, etc.  I was thinking it might be
          neat to have an online 'Japanese History Test' for those who want to see
          what they do and don't know about Japan.  I was thinking that maybe there
          should be several levels: Easy, Medium, and Hard, and that each answer
          would give a small talk on that topic.  I'm trying to figure out what
          would be the best to use for such a project.

          Here are some sample questions I thought up.  I would like to make harder
          ones but I am loathe to do too much without sources handy to make sure I'm
          doing it right.  Some questions I have for the list are (you can e-mail
          the replies privately to fsjlb4@...):
                -What kinds of questions would you like to see?  If you have
          specific questions you think would be good, send them my way!
                -Would anyone ever use such a site?
                -Am I dreaming and should I try for something more realistic?

          I just thought this would be fun.

          -Ii Saburou

          Japanese Test Questions:

          Who are the 'Three Great Daimyos' of the Sengoku Jidai (Warring States
          Period)?
                a.  Tokugawa Ieyasu, Ishida Mitsunari, and Kobayakawa Hideaki
                b.  Minamoto Yoritomo, Taira Kiymori, and Minamoto Yorimasa
                c.  Hiraizumi Tadanobu, Ogami Ittou, and Ii Katsumori
                d.  Oda Nobunaga, Toyotomi Hideyoshi, and Tokugawa Ieyasu
                e.  Takeda Shingen, Uesugi Kenshin, and Maeda Toshiie

          The war between the Taira and Minamoto families which saw the creation of
          the first shogun was:
                a.  Sengoku Jidai
                b.  Gempei Wars
                c.  Battle of Sekigahara
                d.  Pennsic

          The Heian Period is named for what was then the capital of Japan.  Today,
          that city is known as:
                a.  Tokyo
                b.  Nagoya
                c.  Kyoto
                d.  Osaka
                e.  Hiroshima

          The daimyou of the Warring States period often wore which of the following
          garments beneath their armour:
                a.  Hitoe
                b.  Hou
                c.  Hitatare
                d.  Yukata
                e.  Sokutai

          The family that controlled the shogunate at the start of the Warring
          States Period was the:
                a.  Tokugawa
                b.  Hojo
                c.  Ashikaga
                d.  Fujiwara
                e.  Yamakaminari

          'Tokugawa' was a name taken by Ieyasu later in life.  His original family
          name was:
                a.  Takeda
                b.  Minamoto
                c.  Matsudaira
                d.  Fujiwara
                e.  Ishida

          Which noble family was well known as the power behind the imperial throne
          during the Heian Period:
                a.  Fujiwara
                b.  Minamoto
                c.  Taira
                d.  Tokugawa
                e.  Hiraizumi

          The magical creatures well-known for their martial skills, under which
          many famous swordsmen were said to have trained are called:
                a.  Kappa
                b.  Tanuki
                c.  Tengu
                d.  Kitsune
                e.  Ryu

          Which of the following provinces were so well-known for their shinobi that
          spies and men of the shadows were known as 'men of' one of these
          provinces?
          a.  Awa            b.  Omi            c.  Tosa      d.  Bungo
          e.  Owari      f.  Shinano      g.  Iseshima      h.  Echigo
          i.  Echizen      j.  Mikawa      k.  Yamato      l.  Surugi
          m.  Kaga      n.  Musashi      o.  Satsuma      p.  Iga

          Bushi often had three prominent parts to their names.  The second, or
          common name, is occassionally calledy the zokumyo.  Another term for this
          is the:
                a. surname
                b. nanori
                c. yobina
                d. clan name
                e. namae

          The samurai have always been famous as horsemen, but their skills with the
          famous katana were a late addition to their repetoire.  Originally, the
          samurai were best known for their skills with horse and:
                a. yumi, or bow
                b. yari, or spear
                c. naginata, or polearm
                d. nodachi, or great sword
                e. tachi, or straight sword

          There are many types of hats that the Japanese wore.  Bushi would often
          wear which of the following beneath their helmet while fighting:
                a. tate-eboshi
                b. ori-eboshi
                c. kanmuri
                d. jingasa
                e. hiki-tate-eboshi

          Japanese did not often carry shields on their arms as did their European
          counterparts, instead using large, rectangular paldrouns that were often
          laced in special patterns.  These shoulder-guards were called:
                a. kote
                b. sode
                c. do
                d. suneate
                e. haidate

          The entrance to most Shinto shrines is a special, gate-like structure
          known as a:
                a. mon
                b. torii
                c. genkan
                d. hashi
                e. geito

          Which of the following is not typically found in Japanese armour
          construction:
                a. lacquer
                b. metal
                c. leather
                d. bamboo
                e. silk

          In order to become shogun, a bushi had to be descended from what famous
          clan:
                a. Fujiwara
                b. Taira
                c. Ameterasu
                d. Minamoto
                e. Yamakaminari

        • Kass McGann
          ... implementing, ... be ... to see ... there ... answer ... what ... Brilliant! ... harder ... sure I m ... mail ... I think it will be great fun. But I
          Message 4 of 7 , Jan 2, 2001
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            > Here's a concept that just came to me and I'm thinking of
            implementing,
            > and would like comments, suggestions, etc. I was thinking it might
            be
            > neat to have an online 'Japanese History Test' for those who want
            to see
            > what they do and don't know about Japan. I was thinking that maybe
            there
            > should be several levels: Easy, Medium, and Hard, and that each
            answer
            > would give a small talk on that topic. I'm trying to figure out
            what
            > would be the best to use for such a project.

            Brilliant!

            > Here are some sample questions I thought up. I would like to make
            harder
            > ones but I am loathe to do too much without sources handy to make
            sure I'm
            > doing it right. Some questions I have for the list are (you can e-
            mail
            > the replies privately to fsjlb4@u...):
            > -What kinds of questions would you like to see? If you have
            > specific questions you think would be good, send them my way!
            > -Would anyone ever use such a site?
            > -Am I dreaming and should I try for something more realistic?
            >
            > I just thought this would be fun.

            I think it will be great fun. But I think the questions should be
            both simpler and more varied. For example, asking which hat is worn
            under armour is a bit specific. Why not ask which of these articles
            of clothing is not a hat. And also, why not ask some true/false
            questions which are common misconceptions: like "Japanese women
            bound their feet" and "armour was made out of bamboo".

            Kass
          • Kass McGann
            ... One could argue that Japan s capital was NEVER in Kamakura. The Emperor didn t live there. Only the bakufu (tent government) did. It was the government
            Message 5 of 7 , Jan 2, 2001
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              > Japan's capital has moved several times. It has resided in Nara,
              > Kamakura, and Edo (later called Tokyo). The most affluent period,
              > however, is usually considered to be the Heian Jidai.

              One could argue that Japan's capital was NEVER in Kamakura. The
              Emperor didn't live there. Only the bakufu (tent government) did.
              It was the government city, but it was not "a capital". The Capital
              of Japan was Heian-kyo from 794 until 1868. Then it moved to Edo
              during the Meiji Restoration. Kyoto-ites have never truly forgiven
              the Emperor this mistake... ;)

              > 7. Which noble family was well known as the power behind the
              imperial
              > throne during the Heian Period:
              > a. Fujiwara
              > For a long period of Japanese history the Fujiwara family ruled as
              regents
              > of the emperors, manipulating the government from behind the
              throne. They
              > did this by marrying the emperor to their daughters and having
              themselves
              > appointed to powerful positions in the court. They never actually
              > overthrew the emperor and placed themselves on the throne, however.

              Sometimes they weren't even regents but just "grandfathers". From
              the beginning of Japanese history (and before, if you believe the
              legends) the same family has ruled. I mean, if you ignore
              that "southern court/northern court" thing... ;)

              Fujiwara no Aoi
              not Imperial
            • wcbooth@hotmail.com
              ... ~points, and makes funny breathing noises~ then.. you are part of the Rebel Aliance, and a traitor..~motions to a couple of guy s in white armor~ Take her
              Message 6 of 7 , Jan 2, 2001
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                > Fujiwara no Aoi
                > not Imperial

                ~points, and makes funny breathing noises~ then.. you are part of the
                Rebel Aliance, and a traitor..~motions to a couple of guy's in white
                armor~ Take her away!

                (many apologies, Fujiwara Dono, but i had to, or i'd have hurt
                myself...;) )

                Nobum
              • Kass McGann
                ... Can t have you hurting yourself, Nobumitsu-dono... ;) Now if only I could figure out how to program a secret message into this palm pilot... Fujiwara no
                Message 7 of 7 , Jan 2, 2001
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                  > (many apologies, Fujiwara Dono, but i had to, or i'd have hurt
                  > myself...;) )

                  Can't have you hurting yourself, Nobumitsu-dono... ;)

                  Now if only I could figure out how to program a secret message into
                  this palm pilot...

                  Fujiwara no Aoi
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