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Roman Artifacts Found in Fifth Century A.D. Japanese Tomb

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  • FlyingRat
    Interesting new press release from the Nara National Research Institute for Cultural Properties. Glass beads are no surprise in Japan, but these are being held
    Message 1 of 4 , Jun 25, 2012
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      Interesting new press release from the Nara National Research Institute
      for Cultural Properties. Glass beads are no surprise in Japan, but
      these are being held up as explicitly Roman.

      Sent to you by FlyingRat via Google Reader: Roman Artifacts Found in
      Fifth Century A.D. Japanese Tomb via Neatorama by John Farrier on
      6/25/12



      Even with the limited transportation technologies of the time, the
      passage of trade over the world carried glass beads from the Roman
      Empire to the Fifth Century A.D. Utsukushi burial mound in Nagaoka,
      Japan:

      It found that the light yellow beads were made with natron, a chemical
      used to melt glass by craftsmen in the empire, which succeeded the
      Roman Republic in 27 BC and was ultimately ended by the Fall of
      Constantinople in 1453.

      The beads, which have a hole through the middle, were made with a
      multilayering technique — a relatively sophisticated method in which
      craftsmen piled up layers of glass, often sandwiching gold leaf in
      between.

      Link -via The Agitator | Photo: Nara National Research Institute for
      Cultural Properties

      Previously: East Asian Man Found in Roman Empire

      Things you can do from here:
      - Subscribe to Neatorama using Google Reader
      - Get started using Google Reader to easily keep up with all your
      favorite sites


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • KATYA GILLEY
      That is very cool!! My sca brother being Roman Celtic persona opposite of my Nippon based Persona!!! Thanks for sharing!!! RAIN OR SUNSHINE IS OF NO
      Message 2 of 4 , Jun 25, 2012
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        That is very cool!!
        My sca brother being Roman Celtic persona opposite of my Nippon based Persona!!!
        Thanks for sharing!!!

        RAIN OR SUNSHINE IS OF NO MATTER,THEIR HONOR IS GREATER THAN THEIR MOOD.

        WECK UP TO THEES!!!

        To: sca-jml@yahoogroups.com
        From: flyingrat42@...
        Date: Mon, 25 Jun 2012 15:22:15 +0000
        Subject: [SCA-JML] Roman Artifacts Found in Fifth Century A.D. Japanese Tomb


























        Interesting new press release from the Nara National Research Institute


        for Cultural Properties. Glass beads are no surprise in Japan, but


        these are being held up as explicitly Roman.





        Sent to you by FlyingRat via Google Reader: Roman Artifacts Found in


        Fifth Century A.D. Japanese Tomb via Neatorama by John Farrier on


        6/25/12











        Even with the limited transportation technologies of the time, the


        passage of trade over the world carried glass beads from the Roman


        Empire to the Fifth Century A.D. Utsukushi burial mound in Nagaoka,


        Japan:





        It found that the light yellow beads were made with natron, a chemical


        used to melt glass by craftsmen in the empire, which succeeded the


        Roman Republic in 27 BC and was ultimately ended by the Fall of


        Constantinople in 1453.





        The beads, which have a hole through the middle, were made with a


        multilayering technique � a relatively sophisticated method in which


        craftsmen piled up layers of glass, often sandwiching gold leaf in


        between.





        Link -via The Agitator | Photo: Nara National Research Institute for


        Cultural Properties





        Previously: East Asian Man Found in Roman Empire





        Things you can do from here:


        - Subscribe to Neatorama using Google Reader


        - Get started using Google Reader to easily keep up with all your


        favorite sites




        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


















        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • richard johnson
        If the beads are actually Roman, it is not proof of early Roman visits to Japan. More likely, it means that Roman beads were traded to some nation east of the
        Message 3 of 4 , Jun 25, 2012
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          If the beads are actually Roman, it is not proof of early Roman visits to Japan.
          More likely, it means that Roman beads were traded to some nation east
          of the Empire, and the purchasers then sold them to someone in China
          who then sold them to Japan.

          It is very easy for objects to cross entire continents withing a few
          years which really mucks with the historians who are trying to figure
          out if the Vikings made it to Wisconsin or they only reached
          Newfoundland and the junk they left behind got traded and retraded
          across the country.

          On 6/25/12, KATYA GILLEY <fuzzywonder@...> wrote:
          >
          > That is very cool!!
          > My sca brother being Roman Celtic persona opposite of my Nippon based
          > Persona!!!
          > Thanks for sharing!!!
          >
          > RAIN OR SUNSHINE IS OF NO MATTER,THEIR HONOR IS GREATER THAN THEIR MOOD.
          >
          > WECK UP TO THEES!!!
          >
          > To: sca-jml@yahoogroups.com
          > From: flyingrat42@...
          > Date: Mon, 25 Jun 2012 15:22:15 +0000
          > Subject: [SCA-JML] Roman Artifacts Found in Fifth Century A.D. Japanese
          > Tomb
          >
          >
          >
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          >
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          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Interesting new press release from the Nara National Research
          > Institute
          >
          >
          > for Cultural Properties. Glass beads are no surprise in Japan, but
          >
          >
          > these are being held up as explicitly Roman.
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Sent to you by FlyingRat via Google Reader: Roman Artifacts Found in
          >
          >
          > Fifth Century A.D. Japanese Tomb via Neatorama by John Farrier on
          >
          >
          > 6/25/12
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Even with the limited transportation technologies of the time, the
          >
          >
          > passage of trade over the world carried glass beads from the Roman
          >
          >
          > Empire to the Fifth Century A.D. Utsukushi burial mound in Nagaoka,
          >
          >
          > Japan:
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > It found that the light yellow beads were made with natron, a chemical
          >
          >
          > used to melt glass by craftsmen in the empire, which succeeded the
          >
          >
          > Roman Republic in 27 BC and was ultimately ended by the Fall of
          >
          >
          > Constantinople in 1453.
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > The beads, which have a hole through the middle, were made with a
          >
          >
          > multilayering technique — a relatively sophisticated method in which
          >
          >
          > craftsmen piled up layers of glass, often sandwiching gold leaf in
          >
          >
          > between.
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Link -via The Agitator | Photo: Nara National Research Institute for
          >
          >
          > Cultural Properties
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Previously: East Asian Man Found in Roman Empire
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Things you can do from here:
          >
          >
          > - Subscribe to Neatorama using Google Reader
          >
          >
          > - Get started using Google Reader to easily keep up with all your
          >
          >
          > favorite sites
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
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          >
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          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >
          > ------------------------------------
          >
          > UNSUBSCRIBE: E-mail sca-jml-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.comYahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >


          --
          Rick Johnson
          http://Rick-Johnson.webs.com
          "Those who give up a little freedom in return for a little imagined
          security will soon find that they have neither."
        • Ellen Badgley
          Here s a better link, with more details: http://www.thehistoryblog.com/archives/17691 Glass beads are not new finds in ancient East Asia by any means: glass
          Message 4 of 4 , Jun 25, 2012
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            Here's a better link, with more details:
            http://www.thehistoryblog.com/archives/17691

            Glass beads are not new finds in ancient East Asia by any means: glass and
            faience beads believed to have originated in Mesopotamia or Egypt have been
            found in Chinese Warring States and Han period sites (and there are some
            gorgeous "dragonfly" beads both in China and in Silla Korea), and glass
            isn't uncommon at all in Kofun-era tombs. The only real "news" about this
            find is the specific discovery that these beads contain natron, which is so
            strongly linked to the Roman world.

            - Abe

            On Mon, Jun 25, 2012 at 2:07 PM, richard johnson <rikjohnson39@...>wrote:

            > If the beads are actually Roman, it is not proof of early Roman visits to
            > Japan.
            > More likely, it means that Roman beads were traded to some nation east
            > of the Empire, and the purchasers then sold them to someone in China
            > who then sold them to Japan.
            >
            > It is very easy for objects to cross entire continents withing a few
            > years which really mucks with the historians who are trying to figure
            > out if the Vikings made it to Wisconsin or they only reached
            > Newfoundland and the junk they left behind got traded and retraded
            > across the country.
            >
            > On 6/25/12, KATYA GILLEY <fuzzywonder@...> wrote:
            > >
            > > That is very cool!!
            > > My sca brother being Roman Celtic persona opposite of my Nippon based
            > > Persona!!!
            > > Thanks for sharing!!!
            > >
            > > RAIN OR SUNSHINE IS OF NO MATTER,THEIR HONOR IS GREATER THAN THEIR MOOD.
            > >
            > > WECK UP TO THEES!!!
            > >
            > > To: sca-jml@yahoogroups.com
            > > From: flyingrat42@...
            > > Date: Mon, 25 Jun 2012 15:22:15 +0000
            > > Subject: [SCA-JML] Roman Artifacts Found in Fifth Century A.D. Japanese
            > > Tomb
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
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            > >
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            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > Interesting new press release from the Nara National Research
            > > Institute
            > >
            > >
            > > for Cultural Properties. Glass beads are no surprise in Japan, but
            > >
            > >
            > > these are being held up as explicitly Roman.
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > Sent to you by FlyingRat via Google Reader: Roman Artifacts Found in
            > >
            > >
            > > Fifth Century A.D. Japanese Tomb via Neatorama by John Farrier on
            > >
            > >
            > > 6/25/12
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > Even with the limited transportation technologies of the time, the
            > >
            > >
            > > passage of trade over the world carried glass beads from the Roman
            > >
            > >
            > > Empire to the Fifth Century A.D. Utsukushi burial mound in Nagaoka,
            > >
            > >
            > > Japan:
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > It found that the light yellow beads were made with natron, a chemical
            > >
            > >
            > > used to melt glass by craftsmen in the empire, which succeeded the
            > >
            > >
            > > Roman Republic in 27 BC and was ultimately ended by the Fall of
            > >
            > >
            > > Constantinople in 1453.
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > The beads, which have a hole through the middle, were made with a
            > >
            > >
            > > multilayering technique � a relatively sophisticated method in which
            > >
            > >
            > > craftsmen piled up layers of glass, often sandwiching gold leaf in
            > >
            > >
            > > between.
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > Link -via The Agitator | Photo: Nara National Research Institute for
            > >
            > >
            > > Cultural Properties
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > Previously: East Asian Man Found in Roman Empire
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > Things you can do from here:
            > >
            > >
            > > - Subscribe to Neatorama using Google Reader
            > >
            > >
            > > - Get started using Google Reader to easily keep up with all your
            > >
            > >
            > > favorite sites
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > ------------------------------------
            > >
            > > UNSUBSCRIBE: E-mail sca-jml-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.comYahoo! Groups
            > Links
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            >
            >
            > --
            > Rick Johnson
            > http://Rick-Johnson.webs.com
            > "Those who give up a little freedom in return for a little imagined
            > security will soon find that they have neither."
            >
            >
            > ------------------------------------
            >
            > UNSUBSCRIBE: E-mail sca-jml-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.comYahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            >
            >


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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