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...may i please have another?

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  • lynnx@enteract.com
    ... Does either of these bows have a shorter bottom end (from the grip down) than top? some more randomness i got who-knows-where (hope it wasn t Osprey) ;-
    Message 1 of 3 , Dec 30, 2000
      > A hankyuu is literally a "half-bow" -- it's a short version of the
      > Japanese yumi, also called "daikyuu" or "big bow."

      Does either of these bows have a shorter bottom end (from
      the grip down) than top? some more randomness i got
      who-knows-where (hope it wasn't Osprey) ;->

      s.e.
    • Joshua Badgley
      ... I m not sure about the hankyuu, but the daikyuu has the grip closer to the bottom. This makes a lot of sense if if remember that it had to be fired from
      Message 2 of 3 , Dec 30, 2000
        On Sat, 30 Dec 2000 lynnx@... wrote:

        > > A hankyuu is literally a "half-bow" -- it's a short version of the
        > > Japanese yumi, also called "daikyuu" or "big bow."
        >
        > Does either of these bows have a shorter bottom end (from
        > the grip down) than top? some more randomness i got
        > who-knows-where (hope it wasn't Osprey) ;->
        >
        I'm not sure about the hankyuu, but the daikyuu has the grip closer to the
        bottom. This makes a lot of sense if if remember that it had to be fired
        from horseback. If the grip were in the center you wouldn't be able to
        fire because your horse would get in the way.

        Also, another little interesting kyuudou fact for those who didn't already
        know: in Japanese archery (kyuudou) the bow actually rotates in your hand
        as you fire the arrow. It was explained to me that this helps the arrow
        to fly in a straight path, since the string is always behind the arrow.
        On a Welsh-style longbow the arrow apparently has to flex, bending
        around the bow as it launches into the air.

        This little rotation in the yumi also helps to prevent a lot of the
        string-burn on your arm I noticed, too.

        -Ii Saburou, who would like to take up the yumi again...
      • Ogami Itto
        ... already ... your hand ... arrow ... arrow. ... IIRC, the rotation of the bow was something that came about after the bow had ceased to be a useful
        Message 3 of 3 , Jan 2, 2001
          > Also, another little interesting kyuudou fact for those who didn't
          already
          > know: in Japanese archery (kyuudou) the bow actually rotates in
          your hand
          > as you fire the arrow. It was explained to me that this helps the
          arrow
          > to fly in a straight path, since the string is always behind the
          arrow.
          > On a Welsh-style longbow the arrow apparently has to flex, bending
          > around the bow as it launches into the air.
          >
          > This little rotation in the yumi also helps to prevent a lot of the
          > string-burn on your arm I noticed, too.
          >
          > -Ii Saburou, who would like to take up the yumi again...

          IIRC, the rotation of the bow was something that came about after the
          bow had ceased to be a useful instrument of war. (Please correct me
          if I am remembering this incorrectly, Hirazumi-tono!) I believe that
          after the battle of Nagashino (sp?), the teppo [musket] pretty well
          supplanted the bow, and archery became an art form rather than a
          useful martial practice. Again, if I am remembering everything
          correctly (someone, anyone, please correct me if I am wrong!), the
          bow didn't turn in the hand in period, largely because that increased
          the time between shots of the bow.

          ~Takewara Yoshinobu
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