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Re: Kasutera/Castela - a Portuguese sweet bread from 16th c. Japan

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  • LJonthebay
    Looks like nobody s looked at my original thread on the Tousando about this, so I m posting it again. (It includes description of modern kasutera, etc.)
    Message 1 of 10 , Apr 2, 2012
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      Looks like nobody's looked at my original thread on the Tousando about this, so I'm posting it again. (It includes description of modern kasutera, etc.)

      http://tousando.proboards.com/index.cgi?action=display&board=food&thread=4023&page=1

      Batches 2(made with 7 eggs) and 3 (6 eggs) were cheerfully consumed at Estrella War this week. In a discussion with one of my victims, we conjectured that the consistency would have worked well for a ship bread, which makes a great deal of sense when one thinks about how many months a voyage from Portugal to the Far East took. After a couple of days in a zip-lock bag in the Arizona desert (a climate FAR drier than Japan ever gets), the texture somewhat resembled biscotti.

      Saionji Shonagon, sugaring up the Known World for at least a week.
      West Kingdom
    • Solveig Throndardottir
      Noble Cousin! Greetings from Solveig! ... The fancy whisking could be in the oral instructions. Given a culture of knife ceremonies, fancy whisking would not
      Message 2 of 10 , Apr 2, 2012
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        Noble Cousin!

        Greetings from Solveig!
        > Modern kasutera yes. The recipe cited above is in a document dated 1641 CE. No milk, no honey, no fancy shmancy whisking. ;-D Both batches vanished mysteriously into hungry faces at Estrella War with no complaints.
        The fancy whisking could be in the oral instructions. Given a culture of knife ceremonies, fancy whisking would not be surprising.

        Your Humble Servant
        Solveig Throndardottir
        Amateur Scholar



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • LJonthebay
        ... Rath describes this as a flat, pancake-like bread. Whisking aerates the eggs and to my mind, makes sense for a cake batter, less for a bread dough. I fully
        Message 3 of 10 , Apr 2, 2012
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          --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, Solveig Throndardottir <nostrand@...> wrote:

          > The fancy whisking could be in the oral instructions. Given a culture of knife ceremonies, fancy whisking would not be surprising.

          Rath describes this as a flat, pancake-like bread. Whisking aerates the eggs and to my mind, makes sense for a cake batter, less for a bread dough.

          I fully intend to pester one of our cooking Laurels if I see her this weekend because I would LOVE to find a Portuguese or Spanish source for comparison.

          Saionji Shonagon
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